Billion-dollar B2B: cloud-first enterprise tech behemoths have massive potential

More than half a decade ago, my Battery Ventures partner Neeraj Agrawal penned a widely read post offering advice for enterprise-software companies hoping to reach $100 million in annual recurring revenue.

His playbook, dubbed “T2D3” — for “triple, triple, double, double, double,” referring to the stages at which a software company’s revenue should multiply — helped many high-growth startups index their growth. It also highlighted the broader explosion in industry value creation stemming from the transition of on-premise software to the cloud.

Fast forward to today, and many of T2D3’s insights are still relevant. But now it’s time to update T2D3 to account for some of the tectonic changes shaping a broader universe of B2B tech — and pushing companies to grow at rates we’ve never seen before.

One of the biggest factors driving billion-dollar B2Bs is a simple but important shift in how organizations buy enterprise technology today.

I call this new paradigm “billion-dollar B2B.” It refers to the forces shaping a new class of cloud-first, enterprise-tech behemoths with the potential to reach $1 billion in ARR — and achieve market capitalizations in excess of $50 billion or even $100 billion.

In the past several years, we’ve seen a pioneering group of B2B standouts — Twilio, Shopify, Atlassian, Okta, Coupa*, MongoDB and Zscaler, for example — approach or exceed the $1 billion revenue mark and see their market capitalizations surge 10 times or more from their IPOs to the present day (as of March 31), according to CapIQ data.

More recently, iconic companies like data giant Snowflake and video-conferencing mainstay Zoom came out of the IPO gate at even higher valuations. Zoom, with 2020 revenue of just under $883 million, is now worth close to $100 billion, per CapIQ data.

Graphic showing market cap at IPO and market cap today of various companies.

Image Credits: Battery Ventures via FactSet. Note that market data is current as of April 3, 2021.

In the wings are other B2B super-unicorns like Databricks* and UiPath, which have each raised private financing rounds at valuations of more than $20 billion, per public reports, which is unprecedented in the software industry.

#b2b, #battery-ventures, #cloud-applications, #column, #ec-cloud-and-enterprise-infrastructure, #ec-column, #ec-market-map, #enterprise-software, #startups, #tc, #venture-capital

0

Altman brothers lead B2B payment startup Routable’s $30M Series B

We all know the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated digital adoption in a number of areas, particularly in the financial services space. Within financial services, there are few spaces hotter than B2B payments.

With a $120 trillion market size, it’s no surprise that an increasing number of fintechs focused on digitizing payments have been attracting investor interest. The latest is Routable, which has nabbed $30 million in a Series B raise that included participation from a slew of high-profile angel investors.

Unlike most raises, Routable didn’t raise the capital from a bunch of VC firms. Sam Altman, CEO of OpenAI and former president of Y Combinator, and Jack Altman, CEO of Lattice, led the round. (The pair are brothers, in case you didn’t know.)

SoftBank-backed unicorn Flexport also participated, along with a number of angel investors, including Instacart co-founder Max Mullen, Airbnb co-founder Joe Gebbia, Box co-founder and CEO Aaron Levie, Salesforce founder and CEO Marc Benioff (who also started TIME Ventures),  DoorDash’s Gokul Rajaram, early Stripe employee turned angel Lachy Groom and Behance founder Scott Belsky.

The Series B comes just over eight months after Routable came out of stealth with a $12 million Series A.

CEO Omri Mor and CTO Tom Harel founded Routable in 2017 after previously working at marketplaces and recognizing the need for better internal tools for scaling business payments. They went through a Y Combinator batch and embarked on a process of interviewing hundreds of CFOs and finance leaders.

The pair found that the majority of the business payment tools that were out there were built for large companies with a low volume of business payments. 

After running enough customer development we identified a huge scramble to solve high-volume business payments, and that’s what we double down on,” Mor told TechCrunch. 

Routable’s mission is simple: to automate bill payment and invoicing processes (also known as accounts payables and accounts receivables), so that businesses can focus on scaling their core product offerings without worrying about payments.

“A business payment is more like moving a bill through Congress, where a consumer payment is more like a tweet,” Mor said. “We automate every step from purchase order to reconciliation and by extending an API, companies don’t have to build their own inner integration. We handle it, while helping them move their money faster.”

Since its August 2020 raise, Routable has seen its revenue grow by 380%, according to Mor. And last month alone, the company tripled its amount of new customers compared to the month prior. Customers include Snackpass, Ticketmaster and Re-Max, among others.

“We’ve been beating every quarter expectation for the past 18 months,” he told TechCrunch.

The company started out focused on the startup and SMB customer, but based on demand and feedback, is expanding into the enterprise space as well.

It has established integrations with QuickBooks, NetSuite and Xero and is looking to invest moving forward in integrating with Oracle, Microsoft Dynamics Workday and SAP. 

“A lot of our investment moving forward is to be able to bring that same level of automation and ease of use that we do for SMB and mid-market customers to the enterprise world,” Mor told TechCrunch.

Lead investor Sam Altman is in favor of that approach, noting that the recent booms in the gig and creator economies are leading to a big spike in the volume of both payments and payees.

“With the addition of enterprise capabilities, we think this can lead to an enormous business,” he said. 

The round brings Routable’s total raised to $46 million. The company has headquarters in San Francisco and Seattle with primarily a remote team. 

Sam Altman also told me that he was drawn to Routable after having experienced the pain of high-volume business payments himself and working with many startup founders who had experienced the same problem.

He was also impressed with the company’s engineering-forward approach.

“They can offer the best service by being embedded in a company’s flow of funds instead of the usual approach of just being an interface for moving money,” Altman said. 

With regard to the other investors, Mor said the decision to partner with founders of a number of prominent tech companies was intentional so that Routable could benefit from their “deep enterprise and high-growth experience.”

As mentioned above, the B2B payments space is white-hot. Earlier this year, Melio, which provides a platform for SMBs to pay other companies electronically using bank transfers, debit cards or credit — along with the option of cutting paper checks for recipients if that is what the recipients request — closed on $110 million in funding at a $1.3 billion valuation.

#aaron-levie, #airbnb, #altman, #b2b, #behance, #doordash, #finance, #financial-services, #flexport, #funding, #fundings-exits, #gokul-rajaram, #instacart, #jack-altman, #joe-gebbia, #lachy-groom, #lattice, #marc-benioff, #netsuite, #open-ai, #oracle, #payments, #president, #recent-funding, #routable, #salesforce, #sam-altman, #san-francisco, #scott-belsky, #seattle, #startups, #venture-capital, #y-combinator

0

#Brandneu – 9 richtig spannende neue Startups aus München


deutsche-startups.de präsentiert heute wieder einmal einige junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind, sowie Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind. Übrigens: Noch mehr neue Startups gibt es jede Woche in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter Startup-Radar.

hydesk
hydesk aus München entwickelt “nachhaltiges Möbeldesign für mobil und flexible arbeitende Kunden”. Das erste Produkt der Jungfirma, die von Finian Carey und Daniel Brunsteiner gegründet wurde, ist ein faltbarer, tragbarer und recycelbarer Stehtisch und passt somit gut in die derzeitigen HomeOffice-Zeiten.

Pina
Das Münchner Startup Pina setzt mit Hilfe künstlicher Intelligenz auf die Digitalisierung des Zertifizierungsprozesses. So sollen Waldbesitzern die Möglichkeit haben, am freiwilligen Emissionsmarkt teilzunehmen. ”So wird lokaler Klimaschutz im Wald Realität: digital, messbar, und transparent”, schreibt das Team.

exfinity
exfinity positioniert sich als B2B2C-Plattform für Aktivitäten. “We offer the world’s biggest diversified portfolio of attractions and experiences”, teilt das junge Münchner Startup mit. Das Startup wurde unter anderem von Christina Borensky und Georg Schiffmann gegründet, die vorher mit hip trips unterwegs waren.

Optiwiser
Das Münchner Startup Optiwiser kümmert sich um Operations- und Supply Chain-Management. Die Bajuwaren schreiben zu ihrem Konzept: “We help our clients to boost their supply chain performance through the power of Artificial Intelligence – optimize your data wiser”.

PetLeo
PetLeo aus München bringt sich als “digitale Plattform für moderne Tierbesitzer, innovative Tierärzte und glückliche Haustiere” in Stellung. Die App des Startups bietet Tierbesitzern Gassirouten und Giftköder-Alerts vor allem aber eine digitale Gesundheitsakte und Videosprechstunden mit Tierärzten.

Zenmieter
Das Team von Zenmieter möchte sich als die “Zukunft des Vermietens” einen Namen machen. Vermieter können ihre Wohnungen direkt an Zenmieter vermieten. Das Startup des Venture Builders Stryber übernimmt dann alle Aufgaben des Vermieters. Zum Team gehört unter anderem Maximilian Möhring (Keyp).

Melon
Mit Melon hievte Gründerin Cornelia Weinzierl einen Marktplatz für veganes Essen ins Netz. Die Münchnerin nennt es “das eBay und AirBnB für veganes Essen”. Über Melon kann jeder selbst gekochtes, veganes Essen mit Menschen aus der Umgebung teilen bzw. kaufen.

Organic Labs
Bei Organic Labs können Onliner Super Hafer, einen Haferdrink in Pulverform zum Selbermachen, bestellen. “Die Vorteile: Wir vermeiden CO2-Emissionen durch den überflüssig gewordenen Transport von Wasser und können auch noch Verpackungsmüll einsparen”, schreibt das Startup. 

Audicle
Das Münchner Unternehmen Audicle setzt auf das erfolgreiche Curio-Konzept. Das Startup, das von Wolf Weimer vorangetrieben wird, bietet somit quasi die Zeitung zum Hören. Alles gebündelt in einer kostenpflichtigen App. Im Angebot sind derzeit “hunderte Audio-Artikel deutscher Zeitungen und Magazine”.

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über neue Startups. Alle Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der Startup-Szene. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #audicle, #audio, #b2b, #brandneu, #climatetech, #d2c, #e-health, #exfinity, #food, #hydesk, #medien, #melon, #munchen, #optiwiser, #organic-labs, #petleo, #pina, #proptech, #startup-radar, #stryber, #telemedizin, #travel, #zenmieter

0

Revolution Ventures backs Casted in B2B-focused podcast play

Historically, podcasts have been aimed at consumers. The value to be gained in the B2B world is something that has been largely untapped.

For Lindsay Tjepkema — who has been entrenched in the world of B2B marketing for more than 15 years — the opportunity was massive. So in 2019, she founded Casted, an audio and video podcast product aimed at B2B marketers.

And now Casted has raised $7 million in Series A funding led by Revolution Ventures

Existing backers High Alpha Capital, Elevate Ventures and Tappan Hill Ventures also participated in the financing, which brings Indianapolis-based Casted’s total raised to about $9.3 million since its inception.

2020 was a good year for Casted. The startup quadrupled its revenue, tripled its customer base and doubled the size of its team during the course of the 12-month period. It has an impressive list of customers, including PayPal, HubSpot, Drift and ZoomInfo. Casted’s platform is also “the system of record” for Salesforce’s 25+ podcasting shows.

And to make things even more impressive, that revenue growth looks more like 8x year over year, according to Tjepkema.

She believes the company’s value prop goes beyond just giving companies a way to get their podcasts out there. Its ability to analyze data and turn that into intelligence for sales and marketing is what really sets it apart, she said.

“If you’re a podcaster, and you’re doing it to grow a large audience, monetize and sell advertising, the number of downloads is important,” Tjepkema told TechCrunch. “But when you’re a B2B company or an enterprise company, the number of downloads doesn’t help. You need to know who’s engaged, how are people interacting with the content and then how is that going to impact revenue and pipeline, and customer loyalty and lifetime value.”

For starters, Casted’s SaaS platform gives marketing teams a way to publish content. Once published, Casted provides access to a “fully searchable content archive” with transcription services and tagging. It then also helps the company amplify that content via cross-channel distribution. And finally — largely by integrating with digital marketing platforms such as HubSpot, WordPress and Marketo — Casted’s software provides analytics on what a specific user is paying attention to. Those data-driven analytics becomes valuable information for sales and marketing teams in terms of who to target and why.

“Because everything that’s in the platform is transcribed, there are ways to clip it up and share it across other channels and get that into the hands of your sales team so they can use it to make their conversations with their customers even easier,” Tjepkema said. 

Revolution Ventures Managing Partner David Golden said that marketing technology has been a difficult sector for his firm to invest in, considering the volume of companies providing a variety of services such as email optimization and sales automation and business intelligence.

“But what Lindsay and her team was building out was clearly a new category in this space and the sort of slap-your-forehead category. Of course, podcasting for B2B marketing makes all the sense in the world when you look at the evolution of tools that have been available to business marketers, such as blogs, white papers and webinars,” Golden told TechCrunch. “It was just going to be a matter of time before audio and video would be important pieces of that toolbox, and there was nobody doing it.”

Revolution estimates that B2B content makes up roughly just 15% of the podcasting content out there today.

“Given the growth on the consumer side, we think this could be up to a $20 billion market by five years from now,” Golden said.

The company, he added, is just one of a growing number of martech companies based in Indianapolis, including ExactTarget (which was acquired by Salesforce for $2.5 billion).

Looking ahead, Casted said the new capital will go toward expanding its 25-person team and scaling the platform with new integrations and partnerships. 

#b2b, #casted, #david-golden, #funding, #fundings-exits, #marketing, #podcasts, #recent-funding, #revolution-ventures, #saas, #sales, #startups, #tc

0

#Brandneu – 6 neue Startups, die definitiv einen Klick wert sind


deutsche-startups.de präsentiert heute wieder einmal einige junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind, sowie Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind. Übrigens: Noch mehr neue Startups gibt es in unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar.

Bird Eats Bug
Das Berliner Startup Bird Eats Bug möchte Unternehmen helfen, Zeit bei der Behebung von technischen Problemen zu sparen. “Dank einer No-Code-Lösung kann mit Bird Eats Bug jeder Mitarbeiter Fehlerberichte erstellen, mit denen Entwickler bessere Software bereitstellen können”, teilt das Startup mit.

Claire & Blake
Das Berliner Startup Claire & Blake, ein Projekt von Liberty Ventures (Felix und Florian Swoboda), verkauft nachhaltige Luxus-Bettwäsche. Auf der Website heißt es: “Unser Vertrauen für die Verarbeitung unserer kuschelweichen Stoffe haben wir einem traditionellen portugiesischen Familienunternehmen gegeben”.

Cathago
Cathago aus Berlin positioniert sich als “digitale Beschaffungsplattform für die Baubranche”. Dazu teilt das Unternehmen mit: “Ziel ist es die Infobeschaffung rund um nachhaltige Baustoffe zu vereinfachen und einen transparenten, sicheren und effizienten Beschaffungsprozess zu ermöglichen”.

ahead
Das Berliner Startup ahead, das von Kai Koch und John Roggan gegründet wurde, kümmert sich um “self-improvement”. In eigener Sache teilt das Unternehmen mit: “At aHead our goal is to make self-improvement fun and lasting Most of us continuously set goals for our life – for our career, our relationships, our health”.

LifeLive
Bei LifeLive handelt es sich um eine interaktive Streaming-Plattform. Diese erlaubt seinen Nutzer:innen “nicht nur an einem Live-Event – wie einem Konzert, Club-Gig oder Festival-Stage – teilzunehmen, sondern auch mit anderen Nutzern individuell via Live-Video-Übertragung zu kommunizieren”.

Bring
Hinter der Berliner Jungfirma Bring verbirgt sich ein weiterer sogenannter Flash-Supermarkt. Das Startup, das von Orhan Mertyüz gegründet wurde, beliefert seine Kunden – wie die vielen Vorbilder – sehr schnell, in diesem Fall in 30 Minuten, mit frischen Lebensmitteln.

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über neue Startups. Alle Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der Startup-Szene. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#ahead, #aktuell, #b2b, #berlin, #bird-eats-bug, #brandneu, #bring, #cathago, #claire-blake, #food, #lifelive, #startup-radar

0

#Brandneu – Unser Startup des Tages: Optiwiser


Jeden Tag entstehen in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz neue Startups. Im März präsentiert deutsche-startups.de jeden Werktag – garniert mit einem Einhorn – ein junges Startups, das zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind.

Optiwiser
Das Münchner Startup Optiwiser kümmert sich um Operations- und Supply Chain-Management. Die Bajuwaren schreiben zu ihrem Konzept: “We help our clients to boost their supply chain performance through the power of Artificial Intelligence – optimize your data wiser”. Gegründet wurde das Startup von Ediz Erkmen, Enrico Miranda und Maximilian Köhler.

Social Media-Profile von Optiwiser: Instagram, Linkedin

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über neue Startups. Alle Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der Startup-Szene. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar abonnieren und 30 Tage kostenlos testen!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #b2b, #brandneu, #munchen, #optiwiser

0

#DealMonitor – Branded sammelt 150 Millionen ein – Rocket Internet plant Spac-IPO – Blacklane übernimmt Havn


Im aktuellen #DealMonitor für den 9. Februar werfen wir wieder einen Blick auf die wichtigsten, spannendsten und interessantesten Investments und Exits des Tages in der DACH-Region. Alle Deals der Vortage gibt es im großen und übersichtlichen #DealMonitor-Archiv.

INVESTMENTS

Branded
+++ Target Global, Declaration Partners, Tiger Global, Kreos Capital, Lurra Capital, Regah Ventures, Kima Ventures und Vine Ventures investieren 150 Millionen US-Dollar in den Berliner Thasio-Klon Branded. Kreos Capital dürfte in dieser Konstellation für die notwendigen (millionenschweren) Kreditfinanzierungen sorgen. Im Insider-Podcast und in unseren Thrasio-Klon-Übersichten haben wir in den vergangenen Monaten bereits mehrmals ganz kurz über Branded, das maßgeblich von Target Global vorangetrieben und sogar mitgegründet wurde, gesprochen und geschrieben. Der Berliner Amazon-Shop-Aufkäufer wird von Pierre Poignant, früher Lazada, und Michael Ronen, zuletzt SoftBank, geführt. Nach eigenen Angaben übernahm Branded in den vergangenen sechs Monaten bereits 20 verschiedene Shops, die zusammen auf einen Bruttoumsatz in Höhe von 150 Millionen Dollar kommen. Rund 100 Mitarbeiter wirken bereits für Branded. In Deutschland setzen unter anderem die Razor Group, SellerX und The Stryze Group auf das Thrasio-Konzept. The Stryze Group aka ManuCo sammelte zuletzt rund 100 Millionen Dollar ein

AutLay
+++ Venture Creator investiert eine siebenstellige Summe in AutLay. Mit AutLay bekommen Onliner eine Software as a Service-Anwendung für automatisches Dokumenten-Layout an die Hand. “Wir überführen Ihre Inhalte vollautomatisch in ein druckfertiges Dokument”, versprechen David Schölgens und Sven Müller, die Macher hinter AutLay.com. Crew Ventures investierte 2019 bereits einen mittleren sechsstelligen Betrag in die Kölner Jungfirma, das 2017 gegründet wurde. Das Investment soll “vor allem in die weitere Produkt- und KI-Entwicklung sowie in Marketingaktivitäten” fließen.

Famedly
+++ aQua, ein Institut für angewandte Qualitätsförderung und Forschung im Gesundheitswesen, investiert eine hohe sechsstellige Summe in Famedly. Das Berliner Startup, das von Phillipp Kurtz und Niklas Zender gegründet wurde, entwickelt eine Kommunikations-App für Ärzte und Krankenhäuser. Zum Konzept schreiben die Jungunternehmer: “Für einen reibungslosen Einsatz im medizinischen Alltag ist die Software wie ein klassisches Chatprogramm gestaltet”.

ReAct
+++ Die MBG Mittelständische Beteiligungsgesellschaft Schleswig-Holstein und “Privatinvestoren” investieren in das junge Hamburger Software-Unternehmen ReAct. Mit der IoT-Kommunikationsplattform “Call to Action” unterstützt ReAct den Einzelhandel dabei, “eine effiziente, prozessorientierte Kommunikation zwischen Menschen und Maschinen zu etablieren”. Das frische Kapital soll in das “weitere Wachstum, insbesondere die Internationalisierung des Vertriebs und die Erschließung neuer Marktsegmente” fließen. ReAct wurde 2015 gegründet.

Werbezeichen
+++ Donatus Albrecht, Mitinitiator der Aurelius Gruppe, investiert in Münchner B2B-Startup Werbezeichen. Das Unternehmen bietet Kunden “auf seiner digitalen Werbemittel-Plattform die gesamte Palette an Produkten und Merchandise für Unternehmen jeglicher Größe” an. Mehr als 1.200 Unternehmen zählen nach eigenen Angaben zu den Kunden von Werbezeichen. Werbezeichen wird von Florian Ganss, Felix Bumm und Julian Mayer geführt.

IPO

Rocket Internet
+++ Der Berliner Startup-Investor Rocket Internet bereitet den Börsengang einer sogenannten Special Purpose Acquisition Company, kurz Spac, in New York vor. Dabei plant das Unternehmen bei dem IPO einen dreistelligen Millionen-Betrag einzusammeln- siehe FinanceFWD. Die Citibank soll damit beauftragt sein, den Spac-Prozess zu begleiten. Das Thema Spacs ist gerade insbesondere in den USA ein Mega-Thema. Bei einem Spac-Prozess geht es darum, eine Firmenhülle an die Börse zu bringen und dann Unternehmen aufzukaufen und mit dieser Firmenhülle zu verschmelzen. Auch der bekannte Investor Klaus Hommels arbeitet mit seinem Kapitalgeber Lakestar an einem Spac-IPO – allerdings in Frankfurt am Main.

EXITS

Havn
+++ Der Berliner Limousinendienst Blacklane übernimmt die Mehrheit am Londoner Unternehmen Havn, einem elektrischen Taxiservice. “Havn and Blacklane will continue operating separately, learning from one another, and cooperating on sustainability. Your top-quality Havn experience, in-app, online and on the ground, stays the same”, heißt es in der Presseaussendung. InMotion Ventures – also Jaguar Land Rover – bleibt weiter als Anteilseigner an Bord. InMotion Ventures investierte 2019 in Havn. Seit dem Start im Jahre 2011 sammelte der Limousinenservice Blacklane Verluste in Höhe von 60 Millionen Euro ein. 2018 etwa lag der Jahresfehlbetrag bei üppigen 15,4 Millionen.

KptnCook
+++ Miele übernimmt die Mehrheit an der Berliner Rezepte-App KptnCook. Der Hausgerätehersteller war bereits seit 2018 an KptnCook beteiligt, jetzt weitet das Unternehmen seine Beteiligung auf über 50 % aus. “Gemeinsames Ziel ist die Forcierung des Wachstumskurses der mehrfach preisgekrönten App in Deutschland, Österreich, der Schweiz und auch darüber hinaus. Außerdem ist ein stärker personalisiertes Angebot geplant”, teilt das Unternehmen mit. KptnCook wurde 2014 von Eva Hoefer und Alex Reeg gegründet. Das Unternehmen beschäftigt 37 Mitarbeiter:innen.

PODCAST

Insider
+++ Schon die neue Insider-Ausgabe mit Sven Schmidt gehört? in der aktuellen Folge geht es um 10x Group, Glore/Fure, Vytal, Outfittery, Dental21, Gorillas, Bring und Adjust.

Abonnieren: Die Podcasts von deutsche-startups.de könnt ihr bei Amazon Music – Apple Podcasts – Castbox – Deezer – Google Podcasts – iHeartRadio – Overcast – PlayerFM – Podimo – Spotify – SoundCloud oder per RSS-Feed abonnieren.

Achtung! Wir freuen uns über Tipps, Infos und Hinweise, was wir in unserem #DealMonitor alles so aufgreifen sollten. Schreibt uns eure Vorschläge entweder ganz klassisch per E-Mail oder nutzt unsere “Stille Post“, unseren Briefkasten für Insider-Infos.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): azrael74

#aktuell, #autlay, #b2b, #berlin, #blacklane, #branded, #declaration-partners, #hamburg, #havn, #kima-ventures, #koln, #kptncook, #kreos-capital, #london, #lurra-capital, #miele, #mobility, #munchen, #react, #regah-ventures, #rocket-internet, #spac, #special-purpose-acquisition-company, #target-global, #thrasio, #tiger-global, #venture-capital, #venture-creator, #vine-ventures, #werbezeichen

0

ClassDojo’s second act comes with first profits

ClassDojo’s first eight years as an edtech consumer startup could look like failure: zero revenue; no paid users; and a team that hasn’t aggressively grown in years. But the company, which helps parents and teachers communicate about students, has raised tens of millions in venture capital from elite Silicon Valley investors including Y Combinator, GSV, SignalFire and General Catalyst over its life.

If you ask co-founder Sam Chaudhary to explain how the startup survived so long without bringing in money, he responds simply: “When you have something that you think will be for the long term you can put [in] a lot of energy. So, we always kind of maintained the belief that like bringing people together and helping them be connected, especially last year when they needed to be apart, physically apart, was going to be really important.”

In layman’s terms: ClassDojo has been playing the long-game in edtech since 2011, quietly aggregating free users-turned-fans across the world’s public schools, which are notoriously hard to sell due to tight budgets. Every engineer on the team serves a population that is the size of the city of San Francisco. The company has been intentionally frugal throughout the process. Its core service, which is an interface that allows parents and teachers to communicate updates and stay involved in the classroom, is free for anyone to download.

“Our view from the start was actually that the idea of districts isn’t the customer of education, [that’s] kind of backwards,” he said. “It’s like Airbnb saying we’re going to transform travel by selling to hotels.” The route has helped ClassDojo gain traction with 51 million users across 180 countries.

Two years ago, ClassDojo tested this customer love. It launched its first monetization attempt in 2019: Beyond School, a service that complements in-school learning with at-home tutorials. Within four months of launching the paid service, ClassDojo hit profitability. In 2020, the added dimension of COVID-19 helped ClassDojo triple its revenue and grow to have hundreds of thousands of paying subscribers.

It’s a lesson in how a venture-backed startup can successfully live for years without any plans to monetize, grow a super-fan user base, and eventually turn those users into paying customers if the fit is right.

The acceleration of ClassDojo’s business got noticed by Josh Buckley, the new CEO of Product Hunt and a solo capitalist.

“For years, they’ve quietly been building the most adored brand in the industry; kids, teachers and families they serve love it. Their business model follows that vision; they’re focused on serving the consumers, not the ‘system’” Buckley said.

Buckley led a new $30 million financing round for ClassDojo, he tells TechCrunch. The round also includes Superhuman CEO Rahul Vohra, Coda CEO and former Youtube head of product and engineering Shishir Mehrotra, former product lead of growth for Airbnb Lenny Rachitsky, and others.

The financing comes nearly two years after ClassDojo raised a $35 million Series C round led by GSV. When new capital is less than the preceding round it usually signals a downround, but Chaudhary says that ClassDojo had a “significant markup on valuation” with the extension round. The trend of opportunistic extension rounds has grown for edtech startups recently as the pandemic underscores the need for remote learning innovation.

ClassDojo’s next act

With new financing and massive scale, ClassDojo is now trying to evolve from a communication app into a platform that can help students get better learning experiences beyond the one they get from schools.

Chaudhary says that they plan to double ClassDojo’s 55-person team, invest in product, and enter new markets.

“For me, I’d always thought ClassDojo could enable a better future, specifically one where kids’ outcomes aren’t entirely determined by what their ZIP code can offer them,” Chaudhary said. “That’s the kind of future we’ve been building toward.” He likened ClassDojo’s goal as similar to Netflix: provide a broad scope of material for a broad scope of people, not just on-demand political dramas.

ClassDojo is already creating content around topics not discussed in school such as how to fail and how to become an empathetic person, as part of its Big Idea series. The Beyond School offering helps students set goals and track activities, as well as find activities such as dinner table discussion starters or bedtime meditations.

Image Credits: ClassDojo

ClassDojo charges $7.99 a month, or $59.99 annually, for its premium content. The platform is finding small ways to add personalization and spice to its content, such as customized avatars, but further innovation will be key in making its next phase work.

While ClassDojo certainly has a strong user engine to monetize off of, the content game is difficult to win at. Content, to an extent, is commoditized. If you can find a free tutorial on YouTube or Khan Academy, why buy a subscription to an edtech platform that offers the same solution? The commodification of education is good for end-users and is often why startups have a freemium model as a customer acquisition strategy. To convert free users into paying subscribers, edtech startups need to offer differentiated and targeted content.

The United States continues to be a dominant market for ClassDojo, which also has users in the United Kingdom, Ireland, United Arab Emirates and more. While some in edtech express concern that United States consistently lags in consumer spending in education, Chaudhary thinks it’s an unfair assessment.

“To believe that, you have to believe that families don’t care all that much about their kids. And I just don’t think that’s true,” he said. “All the ways that American people express their care for children, there’s such a range, from extracurricular to sports camp to moving to the right zip code.”

And with that mindset, ClassDojo thinks that it can become the brand that families turn to when they think about a child’s education.

“I think there’s just like a missing brand in the world right now,” Chaudhary said. “There’s a blank, a lot of fear, uncertainty, and doubt.”

 

#b2b, #classdojo, #edtech, #education-technology, #sam-chaudhary, #signalfire, #tc

0

How to convert customers with subscription pricing

The lure of subscription pricing is the guarantee of recurring revenue for your business. Once a customer flips the switch to turn on your subscription, it’s easy money:

  • Easy to recognize your revenue.
  • Easy to determine your margins and profits.
  • Easy to enhance your product and extend that revenue out for months, even years.

While that’s true, converting a subscription customer isn’t as simple as flipping a switch. You can build a platform, launch with fanfare, offer all sorts of incentives and trials to attract potential customers — and watch as they disengage and lapse into limbo.

Contrary to popular belief, subscription pricing doesn’t work because of the lower price point that a monthly installment allows.

That’s the actual guarantee that comes with subscription pricing, which will happen unless you cultivate a funnel that catches potential subscribers as soon as they learn about your product and follows them until their very last sign-in.

I built my first subscription-model product in 1999. I’m currently in early-access on my latest, and I’ve launched a bunch more along the way.

While the customer dynamic has changed over the last 20 years, the conversion process has not. In fact, it’s actually gotten easier to convert and retain customers through the subscription funnel.

Here’s what I’ve learned.

Why subscription pricing works

Subscription pricing is a hot trend in just about every business in every industry. Pay-as-you-go is the new normal from software to retail to service.

In my mind, the major shift occurred when mobile phones started pricing unlimited usage per period instead of fixed or cost per minute. Once usage limits were removed, use cases exploded and the promise of a truly mobile computer was finally realized.

Makers of all stripes learned that lesson: From razors to video streaming to accounting software, pricing models have emerged that focus on time periods instead of units.

But contrary to popular belief, subscription pricing doesn’t work because of the lower price point that a monthly installment allows. It’s effective because a subscription reorients each customer’s mind from product function to value proposition.

I don’t care what kind of German engineering went into my razor blades, as long as I have working blades when I need them.

As an entrepreneur, you probably use at least one digital subscription service to build your own product and company, if not several. In fact, just to get to the MVP of my new project, I subscribed to AWS, MailChimp, Zapier and Bubble. I’m still on the free tier of a few more services for some lower-priority features. There’s a few more I quit or never tried.

Thus, you know that value prop plays a big part of whether the customer will pay and stay. So reinforcing your value proposition should play a big part in every level of your customer funnel.

You must catch and track customers to be effective

A subscription-pricing model without an ability to track the steps in the conversion funnel will result in all the headaches of subscription pricing without any of the benefits.

#b2b, #column, #ec-entrepreneurship, #ecommerce, #entrepreneur, #marketing, #saas, #startups

0

Extra Crunch’s Top 10 stories of 2020

I edited hundreds of stories in 2020, so choosing my favorites would be an exercise in futility.

Instead, I’ve tried to gather a sample of Extra Crunch stories that taught me something new. (Which means this top 10 list betrays my ignorance, a humbling admission for a know-it-all like myself.)

While narrowing down the field of candidates, I realized that we’re covering each of the topics on this list in greater depth next year. We already have stories in the works about no-code software, the emergence of edtech, proptech and B2B marketplaces, to name just a few.

Some readers are skeptical about paywalls, but without being boastful, Extra Crunch is a premium product, just like Netflix or Disney+. I know: We’re not as entertaining as a historical drama about the reign of Queen Elizabeth II or a space western about a bounty hunter.

But, speaking as someone who’s worked at several startups, Extra Crunch stories contain actionable information you can use to build a company and/or look smart in meetings — and that’s worth something. Thanks for reading, and I hope you have a very happy new year.


Full Extra Crunch articles are only available to members
Use discount code ECFriday to save 20% off a one- or two-year subscription


1. The VCs who founders love the most

Image Credits: Bryce Durbin/TechCrunch

Managing Editor Danny Crichton spearheaded the development of The TechCrunch List earlier this year to help seed-stage founders connect with VCs who write first checks.

The TechCrunch List has no paywall and contains details and recommendations about more than 400 investors across 22 verticals. Once it launched, Danny crunched the data to pick out 11 investors for which “founders were particularly effusive in their praise.”

2. API startups are so hot right now

Conceptual photo of a cup with clouds. It seems to say, take a break and dream

Image Credits: Juana Mari Moya(opens in a new window)/Getty Images (Image has been modified)

Alex Wilhelm uses his weekday column The Exchange to keep a close eye on “private companies, public markets and the gray space in between,” but one effort stood out: An overview of six API-based startups that were “raising capital in rapid-fire fashion” when many companies were trying to find their COVID-19 footing.

For me, this was particularly interesting because it helped me better understand that an optimal pricing structure can be key to a SaaS company’s initial success.

3. ‘No code’ will define the next generation of software
4. Tracking the growth of low-code/no-code startups

A green sphere stands on top of a pedestal surrounded by a crowd of multicoloured spheres

Image Credits: Richard Drury(opens in a new window)/Getty Images

Two stories about the advent of no-code/low-code software that we ran in July take the third and fourth position on this list.

I have been a no-code user for some time: Using Zapier to send automated invitations via Slack for group lunches was a real time-saver in the pre-pandemic days.

“Enterprise expenditure on custom software is on track to double from $250 billion in 2015 to $500 billion in 2020,” so we’ll definitely be diving deeper into this topic in the coming months.

5. ‘Edtech is no longer optional’: Investors’ deep dive into the future of the market

Point of view, looking up ladder sticking through hole in ceiling revealing blue sky

Image Credits: PM Images(opens in a new window)/Getty Images

Natasha Mascarenhas picked up TechCrunch’s edtech beat when she joined us just before the pandemic. Twelve months later, she’s an expert on the topic.

In July, she surveyed six edtech investors to “get into the macro-impact of rapid change on edtech as a whole.”

  • Ian Chiu, Owl Ventures
  • Shauntel Garvey and Jennifer Carolan, Reach Capital
  • Jan Lynn-Matern, Emerge Education
  • David Eichler, TCV
  • Jomayra Hererra, Cowboy Ventures

6. B2B marketplaces will be the next billion-dollar e-commerce startups

High angle view of Male warehouse worker pulling a pallet truck at distribution warehouse.

Image Credits: Kmatta(opens in a new window)/Getty Images

In 2018, B2B marketplaces saw an estimated $680 billion in sales, but that figure is expected to reach $3.6 trillion by 2024.

As companies shifted their purchasing online, these platforms are adding a range of complementary services like payment management, targeted advertising and logistics while also hardening their infrastructure.

7. Facebook’s former PR chief explains why no one is paying attention to your startup

Caryn Marooney, right, vice president of technology communications at Facebook, poses for a picture on the red carpet for the 6th annual 2018 Breakthrough Prizes at Moffett Federal Airfield, Hangar One in Mountain View, Calif., on Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017. (N

Caryn Marooney, right, vice president of technology communications at Facebook, poses for a picture on the red carpet for the 6th annual 2018 Breakthrough Prizes at Moffett Federal Airfield, Hangar One in Mountain View, Calif., on Sunday, Dec. 3, 2017. Image Credits: Nhat V. Meyer/Bay Area News Group

Reporter Lucas Matney spoke to Caryn Marooney in August at TechCrunch Early Stage about how startup founders who hope to expand their reach need to do a better job of connecting with journalists.

“People just fundamentally aren’t walking around caring about this new startup,” she said. “Actually, nobody does.”

Speaking as someone who’s been on both sides of this equation, I most appreciated her advice about focusing on “simplicity and staying consistent” when it comes to messaging.

“Don’t let the complexity of your intellect cloud what needs to be simple,” she said.

8. You need a minimum viable company, not a minimum viable product

Team of engineers working on a new mechanical model. Multi-ethnic group of young people building an new technology in office.

Image Credits: alvarez(opens in a new window)/Getty Images

In a guest post for Extra Crunch, seed-stage VC Ann Miura-Ko shared some of what she’s learned about “the magic of product-market fit,” which she termed “the defining quality of an early-stage startup.”

According to Miura-Ko, a co-founding partner at Floodgate, startups can only reach this stage when their business model, value propositions and ecosystem are in balance.

Using lessons learned from her portfolio companies like Lyft, Refinery29 and Twitch, this article should be required reading for every founder. As one commenter posted, “I read this thinking, ‘I need to add some slides to my deck!’

9. 6 investment trends that could emerge from the COVID-19 pandemic

10 January 2020, Berlin: Doctor Olaf Göing, chief physician of the clinic for internal medicine at the Sana Klinikum Lichtenberg, tests mixed-reality 3D glasses for use in cardiology. They can thus access their patients’ medical data and visualize the finest structures for diagnostics and operation planning by hand and speech. The Sana Clinic is, according to its own statements, the first hospital in the world to use this novel technology in cardiology. Image Credits: Jens Kalaene/picture alliance via Getty Images

During “the early innings of this period of uncertainty,” an article we published offered several predictions about investor behavior in the U.S.

Although we posted this in April, each of these forecasts seem spot-on:

  1. Future of work: promoting intimacy and trust.
  2. Healthcare IT: telemedicine and remote patient monitoring.
  3. Robotics and supply chain.
  4. Cybersecurity.
  5. Education = knowledge transfer + social + signaling.
  6. Fintech.

10. Construction tech startups are poised to shake up a $1.3-trillion-dollar industry

Rebar is laid before poring a cement slab for an apartment in San Francisco CA.

Image Credits: Steve Proehl(opens in a new window)/Getty Images

I’ve always found the concept of total addressable market (TAM) hard to embrace fully — the arrival of a single disruptive company could change an industry’s TAM in a week.

However, several factors are combining to transform the construction industry: high fragmentation, poor communication, a skilled labor shortage and a lack of data transparency.

Startups that help builders manage aspects like pre-construction, workflow and site visualization are making huge strides, but because “construction firms spend less than 2% of annual sales volume on IT,” the size of this TAM is not at all speculative.

11. Don’t let VCs be the gatekeepers of your success

One blue ball on one right side of red line, many blue balls on left side

Image Credits: PM Images(opens in a new window)/Getty Images

As a bonus, I’m including a TechCrunch op-ed written by insurtech founder Kevin Henderson that describes the myriad challenges he has faced as a Black entrepreneur in Silicon Valley.

Some of the discussions about the lack of diversity in tech can feel abstract, but his post describes its concrete consequences. For starters: he’s never had an opportunity to pitch at a VC firm where there was another Black person in the room.

“Black founders have a better chance playing pro sports than they do landing venture investments,” says Henderson.

#ann-miura-ko, #b2b, #caryn-marooney, #cloud, #covid-19, #diversity, #entrepreneurship, #extra-crunch, #fintech, #no-code-software, #saas, #startups, #venture-capital

0

#Brandneu – 7 neue Startups, von denen man bald mehr hören wird


Jeden Tag entstehen überall in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz neue Startups. deutsche-startups.de präsentiert an dieser Stelle wieder einmal einige ganz junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Tagen, Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind sowie einige junge Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind und erstmals für Schlagzeilen gesorgt haben.

Fleetspark
Beim Berliner Startup Fleetspark geht es um das Einsparen von Benzin. Zielgruppe der mobilen Anwendung sind Logistikunternehmen. In der Selbstbeschreibung heißt es: “FleetSpark is developing a set of technologies to help truck operator reduce their fuel consumption by over 10 %”.

Plan A
Das Berliner Startup Plan A möchte Unternehmen und Mitarbeiter beim Thema Nachhaltigkeit unterstützen. “Our software allows your company to measure, monitor, reduce and offset its environmental impact seemlessly. Create change with your business and improve from it!”, teilt das Startup mit.

DermaDigital
Das Berliner E-Health-Startup DermaDigital entwickelt eine “individuelle Ratgeber-App” rund um das Thema Haut. “Nach kurzer Zeit haben sich spielend einfach und ganz individuell die besten Produkte für deine Haut herauskristallisiert”, verspricht das junge Unternehmen aus Berlin.

Blindside
Hinter Blindside verbirgt sich eine digitale Trainingsplanung. Zielgruppe sind vor allem ambitionierte Amateursportler (Individual- und Mannschaftssport). Blindside eignet sich dabei vor allem für die langfristige Planung und Zielsetzung, den Wissenstransfer zwischen Trainern und die Auswertung der Trainingsplane.

Growify
Beim Berliner Startup Growify dreht sich alles ums Trendthema Lernen. “Growify ist eine Lernplattform, die Menschen zum Lernen motiviert, Jobprofile und Lerninhalte strukturiert und verschiedene (HR-)Systeme miteinander verbindet”, teilt das junge Unternehmen in eigener Sache mit.

AkiCheck
Das junge Berliner Unternehmen Nephrolytix entwickelt mit AkiCheck eine Plattform rund um das Management von Nierenfunktionen. Darüber sollen akute, mittel- und langfristige Veränderungen der Nierenfunktion erkannt, vorhergesagt und verhindert werden können.

Alenti
Die Jungfirma Alenti positioniert sich als B2B-Plattform für das Einholen von Vergleichsangeboten – sowohl für Einkäufer als auch Lieferanten. Zum Konzept teilt das Startup mit: ”Dabei nutzt Alenti das Potenzial künstlicher Intelligenz, um beide Nutzergruppen branchen- und produktabhängig zu unterstützen”.

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über junge, frische und brandneue Startups, die noch nicht jeder kennt. Alle diese Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der bundesweiten Startup-Szene und im besten Fall auf die Agenda von Investoren, Unternehmen und potenziellen Kooperationspartnern. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#akicheck, #aktuell, #alenti, #b2b, #berlin, #blindside, #brandneu, #climatetech, #dermadigital, #e-health, #e-learning, #fleetspark, #growify, #plan-a, #rosenheim, #startup-radar

0

3 ways the pandemic is transforming tech spending

Ever since the pandemic hit the U.S. in full force last March, the B2B tech community keeps asking the same questions: Are businesses spending more on technology? What’s the money getting spent on? Is the sales cycle faster? What trends will likely carry into 2021?

Recently we decided to join forces to answer these questions. We analyzed data from the just-released Q4 2020 Outlook of the Coupa Business Spend Index (BSI), a leading indicator of economic growth, in light of hundreds of conversations we have had with business-tech buyers this year.

A former Battery Ventures portfolio company, Coupa* is a business spend-management company that has cumulatively processed more than $2 trillion in business spending. This perspective gives Coupa unique, real-time insights into tech spending trends across multiple industries.

Tech spending is continuing despite the economic recession — which helps explain why many startups are raising large rounds and even tapping public markets for capital.

Broadly speaking, tech spending is continuing despite the economic recession — which helps explain why many tech startups are raising large financing rounds and even tapping the public markets for capital. Here are our three specific takeaways on current tech spending:

Spending is shifting away from remote collaboration to SaaS and cloud computing

Tech spending ranks among the hottest boardroom topics today. Decisions that used to be confined to the CIO’s organization are now operationally and strategically critical to the CEO. Multiple reasons drive this shift, but the pandemic has forced businesses to operate and engage with customers differently, almost overnight. Boards recognize that companies must change their business models and operations if they don’t want to become obsolete. The question on everyone’s mind is no longer “what are our technology investments?” but rather, “how fast can they happen?”

Spending on WFH/remote collaboration tools has largely run its course in the first wave of adaptation forced by the pandemic. Now we’re seeing a second wave of tech spending, in which enterprises adopt technology to make operations easier and simply keep their doors open.

SaaS solutions are replacing unsustainable manual processes. Consider Rhode Island’s decision to shift from in-person citizen surveying to using SurveyMonkey. Many companies are shifting their vendor payments to digital payments, ditching paper checks entirely. Utility provider PG&E is accelerating its digital transformation roadmap from five years to two years.

The second wave of adaptation has also pushed many companies to embrace the cloud, as this chart makes clear:

Similarly, the difficulty of maintaining a traditional data center during a pandemic has pushed many companies to finally shift to cloud infrastructure under COVID. As they migrate that workload to the cloud, the pie is still expanding. Goldman Sachs and Battery Ventures data suggest $600 billion worth of disruption potential will bleed into 2021 and beyond.

In addition to SaaS and cloud adoption, companies across sectors are spending on technologies to reduce their reliance on humans. For instance, Tyson Foods is investing in and accelerating the adoption of automated technology to process poultry, pork and beef.

All companies are digital product companies now

Mention “digital product company” in the past, and we’d all think of Netflix. But now every company has to reimagine itself as offering digital products in a meaningful way.

#b2b, #battery-ventures, #cloud, #cloud-computing, #column, #coupa, #digital-transformation, #e-commerce, #ecommerce, #enterprise, #labor, #remote-work, #saas

0

B2B marketplaces will be the next billion-dollar e-commerce startups

Startups involved in B2B e-commerce such as Faire and Mirakl have burst out of the gates in 2020. Almost overnight, these startups transformed into consequential platforms, earning billion-dollar valuations along the way. The B2B e-commerce industry has broad reach, encompassing everything from commerce infrastructure and payments technology to procurement and supply-chain solutions. But one area of the B2B e-commerce sector holds outsized promise: marketplaces.

These venues for buyers and sellers of business-related products are exploding in popularity, fueled by better infrastructure, payments and security on the back-end and companies’ increased need to conduct business online during the pandemic.

Even before the pandemic, B2B marketplaces were expected to generate $3.6 trillion in sales by 2024, up from an estimated $680 billion in 2018, according to payments research firm iBe TSD. They were already growing more quickly than most B2C marketplaces that predated them, and when COVID shutdowns hit, many companies scrambled to shift all purchasing online. A survey of business buyers conducted by Digital Commerce 360 found that 20% of purchasing managers spent more on marketplaces, and 22% spent significantly more, during the pandemic.

For many entrepreneurs running B2B marketplaces, the pandemic created new demand for their platforms. Yet to convince businesses to make a permanent shift to online purchasing, B2B marketplaces cannot simply remain stagnant, serving as simple transactional platforms. Those that innovate now to introduce adjacent services will emerge as winners in the next few years, with some inevitably becoming billion-dollar companies.

As a venture capital investor in B2B e-commerce companies, I’m carefully watching the industry and have seen several forward-thinking business models emerge for B2B marketplaces. The predominant revenue model of B2C marketplaces, the gross merchandise value (GMV) take rate, or percentage of each transaction, doesn’t always translate well in the B2B world. Instead, B2B marketplaces are discovering creative new ways to monetize their networks, ensuring their approach is tailored to the complex and nuanced world of B2B e-commerce. I’ll delve into each of these models below, providing examples of marketplaces that have successfully begun implementing them.

What makes B2B transactions unique? Before discussing how B2B marketplaces can deploy new business models, it’s important to think about how B2B transactions typically work.

Payment methods: There are four main ways to make a B2B payment: paper check, ACH transfer, electronic fund transfer (wires), and credit/debit cards. Nearly half of B2B payments are still made by paper check, but digital payment solutions are quickly gaining.

Financing: It is customary in B2B transactions to pay “with terms,” such as net 30 or net 60, effectively giving a line of credit to the business buyer that enables them to send payment after delivery of the good or service. Supply-chain financing and dynamic discounting are two mechanisms business buyers use to settle invoices with suppliers on preferred timelines.

Bulk discounts: Business buyers often expect and receive discounts in return for placing high-volume orders. While not a concept unique to B2B, negotiated or custom volume discounts can complicate the checkout process.

Contractual pricing: Businesses often enter into enterprise-level pricing agreements with their suppliers. In some B2B verticals, such as the veterinary supplies market, there is little consistency and transparency regarding the market price of any given item; instead, each buyer pays a bespoke price tied to contractual agreements. This dynamic typically benefits suppliers, which can price discriminate based on buyers’ ability and willingness to pay.

Delivery method and timing: Unlike consumers, businesses may place orders for goods but delay delivery for weeks or months. This is particularly common in the commodities market, where futures contracts specify a commodity to be delivered on a certain date in the future. B2B transactions typically include a negotiation on delivery method and timing.

Insurance: Business buyers frequently purchase insurance as part of their transactions, particularly in high-value verticals such as jewelry. Insurance is designed to protect against damage to the goods in transit or theft.

Compliance: In some verticals, particularly those related to healthcare and chemicals, there is a heavy compliance burden to ensure goods are properly sourced and transported. Is the seller legally registered to sell and transport sensitive goods such as medical equipment or pharmaceuticals?

With all of these considerations, it’s no wonder B2B e-commerce has been slower to digitize than B2C. From product discovery through the checkout process, a consumer buying a bag of licorice looks nothing like a retailer buying 100,000 bags of licorice from a distributor. The good news for B2B marketplace founders is that, based on the parameters above, there are many creative ways to extract value from transactions that go beyond the GMV take rate. Let’s explore some of the creative ways to monetize a B2B marketplace.

#advertising-tech, #apps, #b2b, #column, #crm, #e-commerce, #ecommerce, #finance, #marketing, #online-marketplace, #retail-stores, #software-platform, #startups, #tc

0

#Interview – “Wir haben schon einige schwierige Zeiten durchlebt”


Das Berliner Startup InstaFreight, das 2016 von Philipp Ortwein und Gion-Otto Presser-Velder gegründet wurde, positioniert sich als digitale Spedition. “Wir machen Straßentransporte effizienter und transparenter. Bei InstaFreight bündeln wir die Transportkapazitäten von mehr als 25.000 Fuhrunternehmern auf unserer Plattform und stellen sie dort Verladern zur Verfügung”, erklärt Mitgründer Ortwein das Konzept der Jungfirma.

Zuletzt investierte Shell Ventures, der Corporate-Venture-Capital-Ableger von Royal Dutch Shell, in das Startup. Zuvor hatte der New Yorker Hedge Fund 683 Capital gemeinsam mit den Altinvestoren eine zweistellige Millionensumme in Instafreight investiert. “Unser Team besteht mittlerweile aus rund. 130 Mitarbeitern und mehr als 20 Nationalitäten. Zu unseren über 2.000 Kunden zählen wir Hidden Champions und DAX-30-Firmen. Ermöglicht wurde das schnelle Wachstum durch unsere Investoren”, sagt Ortwein.

Im Interview mit deutsche-startups.de spricht Ortwein außerdem über Transportkapazitäten, Forderungsmanagement und Technologien.

Wie würdest Du Deiner Großmutter InstaFreight erklären?
Wir machen Straßentransporte effizienter und transparenter. Bei InstaFreight bündeln wir die Transportkapazitäten von mehr als 25.000 Fuhrunternehmern auf unserer Plattform und stellen sie dort Verladern zur Verfügung. Durch digitale Technologien schaffen wir Transparenz entlang der Transportkette und automatisieren Prozesse. Verlader sparen damit Zeit und Geld. Für Fuhrunternehmen finden wir die passenden Ladungen und vermeiden Leerfahrten. Wir sind dabei weder bloßer Vermittler noch reiner Softwareanbieter, sondern für die vertragsgerechte Durchführung der Transporte verantwortlich.

Hat sich das Konzept seit dem Start irgendwie verändert?
Mit InstaFreight ermöglichen wir Verladern und Fuhrunternehmen, direkt miteinander zusammenzuarbeiten und damit Ineffizienzen zu beseitigen und sowohl Transparenz als auch Kapazitätsauslastung zu erhöhen. An diesem Konzept hat sich seit dem Start nichts verändert. Wir sind zunächst mit einem Produkt gestartet, das es Verladern ermöglicht, mittels eines Algorithmus binnen Millisekunden verbindliche Preise für Transporte innerhalb der gesamten EU zu erhalten. Dies hat schnell die Aufmerksamkeit nicht nur von kleinen, sondern auch von großen Verladern und Fortune 500 Unternehmen geweckt. Schnell folgten Einladungen zu Tendern, mit denen sich große Verlader regelmäßige Transportkapazitäten bei uns sichern wollten. Mittlerweile fahren wir für zahlreiche Unternehmen vom Großkonzern bis zum Mittelständler durch ganz Europa.

Die Corona-Krise traf die Startup-Szene zuletzt hart. Wie habt ihr die Auswirkungen gespürt?
Wir haben vor allem schnell und entschlossen gehandelt und so Schlimmeres verhindert. Bereits im Februar haben wir alle Prozesse auf “remote readiness” getestet und geprobt, wie die Teams von zu Hause aus unsere Dienstleistung weiter garantieren können. Als wir dann im März das Team tatsächlich ins Home Office geschickt haben, waren wir positiv überrascht, wie reibungslos alles abgelaufen ist. Außerdem haben wir uns natürlich sehr stark mit dem Thema “Cash Management” auseinandergesetzt und rechtzeitig eine Kreditausfallversicherung und Factoring Lösung für unsere Forderungen abgeschlossen. Damit waren wir dann sogar so gut aufgestellt, dass wir für unsere wichtigsten Partner bzw. Auftragnehmer Zahlungsziele heruntergesetzt haben, um sie durch die Krise zu tragen. Der Markt hat zu der Zeit absolut verrückt gespielt, d.h. Grenzen waren plötzlich zu, Fabriken wurden geschlossen, Toilettenpapier gehortet und der Onlinehandel hat sich verdoppelt. Unter unseren Kunden haben sich Transportvolumen stark verschoben, was wir jedoch Dank der Flexibilität unserer Plattformlösung zuverlässig abdecken konnten. Insgesamt sind wir über die Krise hinweg sogar gewachsen. Mit dem Team haben wir während der gesamten Zeit eng Kontakt gehalten und viel kommuniziert. Neben unserem wöchentlichen “All Hands” haben wir ein zweites wöchentliches “Fireside Chat” mit uns Gründern abgehalten, um offene Fragen zu besprechen und eng in Kontakt zu bleiben. Insgesamt sind wir definitiv gestärkt aus der Krise hervor gegangen.

Wie ist überhaupt die Idee zu InstaFreight entstanden?
Wir sind fasziniert vom Logistikmarkt für Straßenfracht, der mit einem Volumen von 350 Milliarden Euro unglaublich großes Potential hat. Noch immer fahren rund 30 Prozent der Lkw auf europäischen Straßen leer. Der Markt ist von hohen Ineffizienzen geprägt, die unter anderem auf manuelle Prozesse und starke Fragmentierung zurückzuführen sind. Telefon, Fax und Email sind heute noch der Standard in der Logistik – und aus unserer Sicht schon lange nicht mehr zeitgemäß. Mit InstaFreight nehmen wir uns der Herausforderung an, die digitale Revolution der Logistikindustrie maßgeblich voranzutreiben und zum führenden Logistikanbieter für Straßenfracht in Europa zu werden!

Wie genau funktioniert eigentlich euer Geschäftsmodell?
Auf der einen Seite der Plattform sind die Verlader, auf der anderen Seite befinden sich die Fuhrunternehmer. So hat der Verlader Zugriff auf die Transportkapazitäten unserer mehr als 25.000 Fuhrunternehmer und zugleich nur InstaFreight als einzigen Kontakt und Vertragspartei. Den ganzen Prozess von Quotierung über Transportverfolgung bis hin zum Dokumentenmanagement haben wir digitalisiert. Den Fuhrunternehmern bieten wir passende Ladungen, mit denen sie ihre Auslastung optimieren und profitabel wachsen können. Gleichzeitig werden sie über uns den wachsenden digitalen Anforderungen der Verlader gerecht, ohne selber in umfassende IT investieren zu müssen. Insgesamt reduzieren wir also Komplexität, sorgen für effizientere Prozesse und schaffen volle Transparenz entlang der Transportkette. Die Nutzung von InstaFreight ist sowohl für Verlader als auch für Fuhrunternehmer kostenfrei. Wir verdienen an der Arbitrage zwischen dem Verkauf der Transporte und dem Kauf von Transportkapazitäten.

Wie hat sich InstaFreight seit der Gründung entwickelt?
Schon von Beginn an war unser Service europaweit verfügbar. Jetzt haben wir die Internationalisierung unseres Geschäfts noch weiter vorangetrieben und weitere Büros im Ausland eröffnet. Wir sind also viel internationaler geworden und auch deutlich gewachsen: Unseren Umsatz haben wir von Jahr zu Jahr vervielfacht. Man merkt auch, dass unser Produkt wirklich etwas ist, das der Markt braucht. Während wir am Anfang natürlich kräftig die Werbetrommel rühren mussten, kommen jetzt viele Unternehmen auf uns zu, weil unser digitaler Ansatz sie begeistert.

Nun aber einmal Butter bei die Fische: Wie groß ist InstaFreight inzwischen?
Unser Team besteht mittlerweile aus rund. 130 Mitarbeitern und mehr als 20 Nationalitäten. Zu unseren über 2.000 Kunden zählen wir Hidden Champions und DAX-30-Firmen. Über unseren Umsatz sprechen wir für gewöhnlich nicht öffentlich, wir machen aber rund 10.000 Transporte im Monat und sind ausschließlich organisch gewachsen. Besonders stolz sind wir darauf, dass wir trotz deutlichem Wachstum die Anzahl Mitarbeiter in den operativen Bereichen über die letzten 12 Monate konstant gehalten haben. Damit skalieren wir durch Technologie und nicht durch das Hiring von zusätzlichen Mitarbeitern. Ermöglicht wurde das schnelle Wachstum durch unsere Investoren, zu denen neben Rocket der CVC Capital-Gründer Steve Koltes zählt. Wir haben darüber hinaus mit 683 Capital Management einen amerikanischen Hedge Fund an Bord, der sich auf Technologieunternehmen fokussiert. Anfang dieses Jahres ist noch Shell Ventures als strategischer Partner und Investor mit dazu gekommen.

Blicke bitte einmal zurück: Was ist in den vergangenen Jahren so richtig schief gegangen?
Wir haben schon einige schwierige Zeiten durchlebt. Wie viele andere B2B-Startups mussten wir lernen, wie wichtig ein gutes Forderungsmanagement gegenüber den Kunden ist. Gerade wenn man große Konzerne als Kunden hat, ist dies nicht immer einfach. Das mit Abstand Schlimmste war jedoch der Todesfall im Gründerteam ganz zu Anfang von InstaFreight. Das hat uns alle damals sehr mitgenommen und uns als Team noch mehr zusammengeschweißt – aufgeben war nie eine Option. Alle diese Krisen haben uns aber immer wieder das Gleiche gelehrt: Selber nie den Glauben verlieren, sich mit voller Entschlossenheit den Herausforderungen stellen und vor allem sehr offen und ehrlich mit dem Team darüber sprechen, was gerade passiert.

Und wo habt ihr bisher alles richtig gemacht?
Wir haben eine super Kombination aus Produkt und Team aufgebaut. Für uns als Dienstleistungsunternehmen ist das auch extrem wichtig, denn wir befähigen unsere Mitarbeiter einen besseren Service für unsere Kunden zu bieten als unsere analogen Wettbewerber und dabei auch noch produktiver zu sein. Wir sind gut darin, nicht nur vorausschauend in die richtigen Partnerschaften und Produkt Features zu investieren, sondern auch in unser Team. Wir denken auch, dass wir eine gute Kultur aufgebaut haben. Unsere Fluktuation ist sehr gering und wir bekommen viel Lob in unseren anonymen Mitarbeiterumfragen besonders zu Learning & Development. Allgemein geben wir uns nie mit dem Status Quo zufrieden. Dafür haben wir auch einfach noch zu viele Ideen. Aber schon jetzt sind wir auf einem Stand, bei dem wir auf jeden Fall zu den technisch führenden Logistikunternehmen in Europa zählen. An dieser Stelle ein großes Shout-out an das Team!

Wo steht InstaFreight in einem Jahr?
Wir arbeiten gerade mit Hochdruck daran, ein neues Produkt auf den Markt zu bringen. Dieses testen wir seit geraumer Zeit mit einigen Kunden und haben bereits mit geringer Vertriebsaktivität eine super Traction aufgebaut. Unser Geschäftsmodell bleibt dabei gleich, wir werden lediglich die Monetarisierung etwas ändern. Aktuell sind wir mit dieser Weiterentwicklung noch alleine auf dem Europäischen Frachtmarkt tätig. Wir planen unseren offiziellen Launch im vierten Quartal 2020, also stay tuned! Parallel dazu internationalisieren wir unser Geschäft weiter. Neben aktiven Vertriebsteams in Italien, Polen und den Niederlanden eröffnen wir gerade Büros in Spanien und Frankreich. Dabei wird unser Fokus weiter auf internationalem Geschäft liegen. Insgesamt ist es uns bisher in jedem Jahr gelungen, unseren Umsatz zu vervielfachen und damit planen wir auch in diesem und im nächsten Jahr. Natürlich geht das nur mit dem entsprechenden Team dahinter, welches dieses Geschäftswachstum auch bedienen und weiter vorantreiben kann. Wir sind deshalb stets auf der Suche nach klugen Köpfen, die dafür brennen, gemeinsam mit uns die Zukunft der Logistik zu gestalten.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): InstaFreight

#aktuell, #b2b, #instafreight, #interview, #logistik

0

#Brandneu – 7 junge Startups, die wir ganz genau beobachten


Jeden Tag entstehen überall in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz neue Startups. deutsche-startups.de präsentiert an dieser Stelle wieder einmal einige ganz junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Tagen, Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind sowie einige junge Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind und erstmals für Schlagzeilen gesorgt haben.

emocean
Das Münchner Startup emocean entwickelt mit indigo eine Software, die Maschinen und Anwendungen miteinander kommunizieren lässt – und das in Echtzeit. “Gleichzeitig ist sie herstellerunabhängig einsetzbar und bis auf die kleinsten Ebenen im Fertigungsprozess skalierbar”, teilt die Jungfirma mit. Gründer sind Philipp Karl Kirschenhofer und Michael Maximilian Schwarz.

PeopleFlow
Das Berliner Startup PeopleFlow unterstützt Unternehmen beim HR-Management von Auslandsmitarbeitern. PeopleFlow managt dabei Dinge wie Gehaltsabrechnung, Sozialleistungen und Steuern. “Mit PeopleFlow sind Sie immer zu 100% rechtskonform”, verspricht die Jungfirma, die von Carsten Lebtig geführt wird.

asvin
Das Stuttgarter Startup asvin kümmert sich um das ganz große Thema Cyber Security – und zwar im Zusammenhang mit den beiden Trends Internet of Things und Smart Cities. Das Motto dabei lautet: “Distribute and track IoT Updates on product lifecycles”. Gründer sind Sven Rahlfs und Mirko Ross.

Beyond Saving
Beyond Saving aus Frankfurt am Main tritt an, um die Finanzbildung im Lande zu verbessern. “Wir verstehen uns als Informations- und Bildungsplattform für finanzielle Selbstentscheider und diejenigen, die es noch werden möchten”, versprechen die Gründer (Carlos Link-Arad und Martin Klatt) dabei.

Sidequest?
Das Münchner Startup Sidequest ermöglicht Teams den Betrieb von sogenannten Helpdesks direkt im gewohnten Slack-Interface. So will die Jungfirma aus dem Hause mantro “die große Lücke zwischen klassischen Ticketsystemen und modernen Aufgabenverwaltungen” schließen. Gegründet wurde die Jungfirma von Benjamin Schüdzig und Manfred Tropper.

ChefsList
Bei ChefsList handelt es sich um “eine App für alle Großhändler”. Zielgruppe sind Gastronomen. Das Unternehmen aus Frankfurt am Main verspricht dabei: “Mit ChefsList behalten Sie auf Knopfdruck alles im Überblick. Und das komplett kostenlos”. Gründer sind Andre Klein, William Harris und Michel Seguin.

Lumiform
Das Startup Lumiform, bisher unter dem Namen Zyp.One bekannt, digitalisiert Sicherheitsprüfungen. Auf der Website heißt es: “Mit der Lumiform App führst du Prüfungen kinderleicht durch, löst Vorfälle schnell im Team und steigerst damit die Qualität und Sicherheit”. Gründer sind Lukas Roelen-Blasberg und Philip Roelen-Blasberg.

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über junge, frische und brandneue Startups, die noch nicht jeder kennt. Alle diese Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der bundesweiten Startup-Szene und im besten Fall auf die Agenda von Investoren, Unternehmen und potenziellen Kooperationspartnern. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #asvin, #b2b, #berlin, #beyond-saving, #brandneu, #chefslist, #cyber-security, #emocean, #fintech, #frankfurt-am-main, #hr, #industrialtech, #lumiform, #munchen, #peopleflow, #sidequest, #startup-radar, #stuttgart, #zyp-one

0

DataFleets keeps private data useful, and useful data private, with federated learning and $4.5M seed

As you may already know, there’s a lot of data out there, and some of it could actually be pretty useful. But privacy and security considerations often put strict limitations on how it can be used or analyzed. DataFleets promises a new approach by which databases can be safely accessed and analyzed without the possibility of privacy breaches or abuse — and has raised a $4.5 million seed round to scale it up.

To work with data, you need to have access to it. If you’re a bank, that means transactions and accounts; if you’re a retailer, that means inventories and supply chains, and so on. There are lots of insights and actionable patterns buried in all that data, and it’s the job of data scientists and their ilk to draw them out.

But what if you can’t access the data? After all, there are many industries where it is not advised or even illegal to do so, such as in health care. You can’t exactly take a whole hospital’s medical records, give them to a data analysis firm, and say “sift through that and tell me if there’s anything good.” These, like many other data sets, are too private or sensitive to allow anyone unfettered access. The slightest mistake — let alone abuse — could have serious repercussions.

In recent years a few technologies have emerged that allow for something better, though: analyzing data without ever actually exposing it. It sounds impossible, but there are computational techniques for allowing data to be manipulated without the user ever actually having access to any of it. The most widely used one is called homomorphic encryption, which unfortunately produces an enormous, orders-of-magnitude reduction in efficiency — and big data is all about efficiency.

This is where DataFleets steps in. It hasn’t reinvented homomorphic encryption, but has sort of sidestepped it. It uses an approach called federated learning, where instead of bringing the data to the model, they bring the model to the data.

DataFleets integrates with both sides of a secure gap between a private database and people who want to access that data, acting as a trusted agent to shuttle information between them without ever disclosing a single byte of actual raw data.

Illustration showing how a model can be created without exposing data.

Image Credits: DataFleets

Here’s an example. Say a pharmaceutical company wants to develop a machine learning model that looks at a patient’s history and predicts whether they’ll have side effects with a new drug. A medical research facility’s private database of patient data is the perfect thing to train it. But access is highly restricted.

The pharma company’s analyst creates a machine learning training program and drops it into DataFleets, which contracts with both them and the facility. DataFleets translates the model to its own proprietary runtime and distributes it to the servers where the medical data resides; within that sandboxed environment, it runs grows into a strapping young ML agent, which when finished is translated back into the analyst’s preferred format or platform. The analyst never sees the actual data, but has all the benefits of it.

Screenshot of the DataFleets interface. Look, it’s the applications that are meant to be exciting.

It’s simple enough, right? DataFleets acts as a sort of trusted messenger between the platforms, undertaking the analysis on behalf of others and never retaining or transferring any sensitive data.

Plenty of folks are looking into federated learning; the hard part is building out the infrastructure for a wide-ranging enterprise-level service. You need to cover a huge amount of use cases and accept an enormous variety of languages, platforms, and techniques, and of course do it all totally securely.

“We pride ourselves on enterprise readiness, with policy management, identity access management, and our pending SOC 2 certification,” said DataFleets COO and co-founder Nick Elledge. “You can build anything on top of DataFleets and plug in your own tools, which banks and hospitals will tell you was not true of prior privacy software.”

But once federated learning is set up, all of a sudden the benefits are enormous. For instance, one of the big issues today in combating COVID-19 is that hospitals, health authorities, and other organizations around the world are having difficulty, despite their willingness, in securely sharing data relating to the virus.

Everyone wants to share, but who sends whom what, where is it kept, and under whose authority and liability? With old methods, it’s a confusing mess. With homomorphic encryption it’s useful but slow. With federated learning, theoretically, it’s as easy as toggling someone’s access.

Because the data never leaves its “home,” this approach is essentially anonoymous and thus highly compliant with regulations like HIPAA and GDPR, another big advantage. Elledge notes: “We’re being used by leading healthcare institutions who recognize that HIPAA doesn’t give them enough protection when they are making a data set available for third parties.”

Of course there are less noble, but no less viable, examples in other industries: wireless carriers could make subscriber metadata available without selling out individuals; banks could sell consumer data without violating anyone in particular’s privacy; bulky datasets like video can sit where they are instead of being duplicated and maintained at great expense.

The company’s $4.5M seed round is seemingly evidence of confidence from a variety of investors (as summarized by Elledge): AME Cloud Ventures (Jerry Yang of Yahoo!) and Morado Ventures, Lightspeed Venture Partners, Peterson Ventures, Mark Cuban, LG, Marty Chavez (President of the Board of Overseers of Harvard), Stanford-StartX fund, and three unicorn founders (Rappi, Quora, and Lucid).

With only 11 full time employees DataFleets appears to be doing a lot with very little, and the seed round should enable rapid scaling and maturation of its flagship product. “We’ve had to turn away or postpone new customer demand to focus on our work with our lighthouse customers,” Elledge said. They’ll be hiring engineers in the U.S. and Europe to help launch the planned self-service product next year.

“We’re moving from a data ownership to a data access economy, where information can be useful without transferring ownership,” said Elledge. If his company’s bet is on target, federated learning is likely to be a big part of that going forward.

#artificial-intelligence, #b2b, #b2b-saas, #datafleets, #encryption, #enterprise, #enterprise-saas, #federated-learning, #homomorphic-encryption, #machine-learning, #privacy, #saas, #security, #tc

0

#Interview – “Homebell hat turbulente Zeiten hinter sich, in denen das Unternehmen schnell gewachsen ist”


Das Kölner Unternehmen Portal United, zu dem unter anderem die Handwerker-Plattform blauarbeit.de gehört, übernimmt die Überreste von Homebell. In das gescheiterte Berliner Startup, einem Handwerker-Dienstleister, das die Leistungen von Handwerksbetrieben vermittelte, flossen in den vergangenen Jahren rund 20 Millionen Euro – unter anderem von Rocket Internet, Lakestar, SevenVentures, Kärcher New Venture, Index Ventures, Helvetia Venture und Axa.

Anfangs war Homeball, das 2016 von Felix Swoboda und Sascha Weiler gegründet wurde, im B2C-Segment unterwegs, später folgte der Fokus auf B2B. Angedacht war zuletzt ein größerer Ausbau des Geschäftskundenbereiches, insbesondere für die Bearbeitung von Versicherungs-Schadenfällen. Weswegen wohl auch AXA Deutschland und Helvetia Versicherungen immer weiter in das Unternehmen investierten. Vor wenigen Monaten verschwand Homebell dann ohne große Ankündigungen aus dem Netz.

“Homebell hat turbulente Zeiten hinter sich, in denen das Unternehmen schnell sehr stark gewachsen ist. Der Wunsch der Gründer, Felix Swoboda und Sascha Weiler, die Handwerksplattform international zu betreiben, hat neben anderen Faktoren dazu geführt, dass das Unternehmen nicht die geplanten Umsätze verbuchen konnte. Aus den Herausforderungen und Learnings der letzten Jahre möchten wir nun einen Neustart in Angriff nehmen”, sagt Alexander Oberst, Geschäftsführer von Portal United.

Die Rheinländern wollen sich mit Homebell nun auch im B2B-Segment etablieren. “Wir glauben fest daran, dass das Prinzip funktioniert. Anders als in den vergangenen Jahren, sollen Homebell und die entstehenden Geschäftsmodelle im Bereich B2B unter dem Dach der Portal United GmbH langfristig aufgebaut werden. Wir werden den Fokus und die Investments ganz klar auf die Geschäftsfelder setzen, die sich nach einer ersten Anlaufphase auch als langfristig erfolgversprechende Modelle herausstellen”, führt Oberst aus.

Im Interview mit deutsche-startups.de spricht der Portal United-Macher außerdem über organisches Wachstum, kundenorientierte Lösungen und finale Entscheidungen.

Homebell ist vor einigen Monaten sang- und klanglos aus dem Netz verschwunden. Nun wandert die Plattform unter das Dach von Portal United. Was sind die Gründe für die Übernahme?
Wir, die Portal United GmbH, die ja mit blauarbeit.de auch das älteste Handwerksportal in Deutschland betreibt, sehen mit der Übernahme von Homebell eine große Chance für die strategische Neupositionierung am Markt. Bisher waren wir ausschließlich im B2C-Geschäft tätig und über viele Jahre erfolgreich. Nun gilt es, vor allem den Handwerksbetrieben, die gemeinsam mit Blauarbeit gewachsen sind, weitere spannende Optionen an die Hand zu geben. Diese sehen wir vor allem im B2B-Geschäft. Homebell hat, auch wenn es noch keinen durchdringenden Markterfolg gab, vor allem systemseitig enorm gute Voraussetzungen dafür geschaffen. Daran gilt es anzuknüpfen und die Fesseln, die es zu Beginn der Homebell-B2B-Phase gab, schnell abzulegen. Vor dem Hintergrund der langfristigen strategischen Denkweise, die uns bei Portal United auszeichnet, sollen nach und nach neue Mehrwerte für Handwerksbetriebe entstehen, sowohl im Bereich B2C, aber vor allem auch im B2B Geschäft.

Seit der Gründung im Jahre 2015 investierten diverse Geldgeber knapp 20 Millionen Euro in Homebell. Die Verluste von Homebell waren fast genauso hoch. Kann das Homebell-Prinzip überhaupt langfristig funktionieren?
Wir glauben fest daran, dass das Prinzip funktioniert. Anders als in den vergangenen Jahren, sollen Homebell und die entstehenden Geschäftsmodelle im Bereich B2B unter dem Dach der Portal United GmbH langfristig aufgebaut werden. Wir werden den Fokus und die Investments ganz klar auf die Geschäftsfelder setzen, die sich nach einer ersten Anlaufphase auch als langfristig erfolgversprechende Modelle herausstellen. Rund um Philipp Hamm, der 2019 schon bei Homebell für das B2B-Geschäft verantwortlich war, soll in Berlin perspektivisch ein neues Team aus motivierten MitarbeiterInnen aufgebaut werden, um mit voller Überzeugung die Potenziale im Bereich B2B auszuschöpfen. Homebell hat turbulente Zeiten hinter sich, in denen das Unternehmen schnell sehr stark gewachsen ist.

Was lief dabei schief?
Der Wunsch der Gründer, Felix Swoboda und Sascha Weiler, die Handwerksplattform international zu betreiben, hat neben anderen Faktoren dazu geführt, dass das Unternehmen nicht die geplanten Umsätze verbuchen konnte. Aus den Herausforderungen und Learnings der letzten Jahre möchten wir nun einen Neustart in Angriff nehmen. Zu Beginn werden wir daher verschiedene Geschäftsmodelle im Bereich B2B im Markt validieren, bevor wir eine finale Entscheidung treffen.

Wie viel vom alten Homebell steckt überhaupt noch im neuen Homebell?
Grundsätzlich gilt die Devise: Wir möchten das, was bei Homebell schon gut angelaufen ist, in die neue Struktur übernehmen. Allerdings werden wir das, was wir durch unsere vorhandene Struktur und unsere langjährige Erfahrung am Markt glauben besser zu können, auch umsetzen. Die Kombination dieser beiden Punkte soll Homebell zum Erfolg führen. Während Homebell zwischenzeitlich in mehreren Ländern aktiv war, konzentriert sich Portal United nach dem Relaunch zunächst auf deutschlandweite Aktivitäten. Daher werden wir Homebell mit Sitz in Berlin unter der Leitung von Philipp Hamm neu aufbauen. Dabei gibt es auf unserer Seite eine große Offenheit, über das ehemalige Homebell-B2B-Geschäft hinaus auch neue Ansätze zu prüfen. Falls Bedarf und Potenzial am Markt besteht, werden wir diese auch angehen. Wir sind sehr stolz darauf, dass uns grundsätzlich trotz der Übernahme nahezu alle bisherigen Handwerksbetriebe weiter ihr Vertrauen schenken. Das möchten wir durch die Bereitstellung von Mehrwert bringenden Lösungen auch zurückgeben.

Homebell war zwischenzeitlich in mehreren Ländern aktiv. Ist dies auch künftig eine Option?
In absehbarer Zeit ist dies nicht geplant, da der Geschäftsaufbau zunächst Schritt für Schritt in Deutschland durchgeführt werden soll und wir organisches Wachstum erzielen möchten.

Zu Portal United gehören auch blauarbeit.de und meister.de. Wie sollen diese Plattformen und Homebell zusammenarbeiten?
Mit der Portal United GmbH schaffen wir Plattformen, über die AuftraggeberInnen zu professionellen HandwerkerInnen und DienstleisterInnen rund um Haus und Grund finden. Eine kontinuierliche Weiterentwicklung ist hierbei unser oberstes Gebot, um den Endkunden und AnbieterInnen der Dienstleistungen den bestmöglichen Service zu liefern. Unser Ziel ist es, durch die Integration kundenorientierter Lösungen, einen Mehrwert für beide Seiten zu schaffen und ein möglichst breites Angebot im Bereich Dienstleistungen abzudecken. Zur möglichen Zusammenarbeit: Jeder Plattform liegt ein eigenes Geschäftsmodell und eine eigenständige Organisation zugrunde, aber natürlich liegt es auf der Hand, dass die einzelnen Portale auch eng zusammenarbeiten. Ein konkretes Beispiel ist, dass wir an einer übergeordneten Kundendaten-Struktur arbeiten, um für jede/n KundIn, egal ob VerbraucherIn oder HandwerkerIn, am Ende ein passendes Angebot für den jeweiligen Bedarf zu haben. Durch die deutliche Erweiterung unseres Portfolios ist das nun ganz gezielt möglich.

Wo steht Homebell in einem Jahr?
Das mit den Homebell Assets ausgestaltete B2B-Geschäft wird ein sehr gut integrierter und wichtiger Teil der Portal United sein und wird im ersten Jahr “unter neuem Dach” schon enorm von der vorhandenen Expertise profitiert haben. Darauf aufbauend hat sich das Geschäft im Laufe des Jahres 2020 für viele Unternehmen, die im B2B-Bereich Bedarf an Handwerkerleistungen haben, bereits als ein/e wertvolle/r PartnerIn auf Augenhöhe entwickelt.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #b2b, #berlin, #blauarbeit-de, #homebell, #interview, #koln, #portal-united

0

#Brandneu – 6 neue Startups, die ihr euch anschauen solltet


Jeden Tag entstehen überall in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz neue Startups. deutsche-startups.de präsentiert an dieser Stelle wieder einmal einige ganz junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Tagen, Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind sowie einige junge Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind und erstmals für Schlagzeilen gesorgt haben.

Flexcavo
Bei Flexcavo aus Rosenheim, das von Picus Capital angeschoben wurde, dreht sich alles um das MIeten von Baumaschinen. “Wir kombinieren unsere Mietflotte mit innovativer Technologie, um gemeinsam mit Ihnen den Einsatz von Baumaschinen zu optimieren”, teilen die Jungunternehmer mit.

URL: www.flexcavo.de
Hashtags: #eCommerce #B2B
Ort: Rosenheim
Gründer: Leonhard Fricke, Benedict Aicher

wirbauen.digital
Die Kölner Jungfirma wirbauen.digital positioniert sich als “praxisnahe Online-Plattform, um Architekten, Handwerkern und Bauherren lästige Verwaltungsarbeit abzunehmen”. Dafür bildet das Unternehmen, das von Daniel Grube geführt wird, die Bauprozesse digital ab.

URL: www.wirbauendigital.de
Hashtags: #PropTech #ConTech
Ort: #Köln
Gründer: Daniel Grube

Foodiary
Bei Foodiary dreht sich alles um gesunde Ernährung. “Mit dem Ernährungsplan von Foodiary erhältst du einen auf dich persönlich abgestimmten Ernährungsplan mit Rezepten, der dich unterstützt, dein Ziel zu erreichen”, heißt es auf der Website. Die kostet dabei ab 4,99 Euro pro Monat.

URL: www.foodiary.app
Hashtags: #Food #Wellness
Ort: Waiblingen
Gründer: Felix Mergenthaler

flair
Mit flair drängt eine “HR-Lösung für Salesforce” auf den Markt. Das System des Münchner Startup ist nach eigenen Angaben in der Lage “ jeden Prozess der HR-Abteilung von der Lohnabrechnung über Recruiting bis zum Spesenmanagement und DocuSign zu automatisieren”

URL: www.flair.hr
Hashtags: #HR #Software
Ort: München
Gründer: Evgenii Pavlov, Thiago Rodrigues de Paula

Audiopedia
Das Startup Audiopedia positioniert sich als “offenes, kollaboratives Projekt, um hörbares Wissen zur Verfügung zu stellen”. Zielgruppe sind Menschen, die nicht lesen können und keinen Zugang zu vielen Informationen haben. Das Projekt wird bereits vom Wikimedia Accelerator gefördert.

URL: www.audiopedia.org
Hashtags: #Audio
Ort: Gräfenhausen
Gründer: Felicitas Heyne, Marcel Heyne

jesango
Das junge Münchner Startup jesango versucht sich als “Fairfashion Shopping Community” zu etablieren. Die Bajuwaren wollen dabei vor allem “coole, stylische und aufstrebende Brands” in ihrem Shop versammlen. Auch eine “Fair Fashion Shopping App” ist bereits geplant.

URL: www.jesango.de
Hashtags: #eCommerce #Nachhaltigkeit
Ort: München
Gründer: Catja Günther, Sophia Wittrock und Larissa Schmid

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über junge, frische und brandneue Startups, die noch nicht jeder kennt. Alle diese Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der bundesweiten Startup-Szene und im besten Fall auf die Agenda von Investoren, Unternehmen und potenziellen Kooperationspartnern. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #audiopedia, #brandneu, #flair, #flexcavo, #foodiary, #jesango, #startup-radar, #wirbauen-digital

0

How to get the most branding bang out of your B2B IPO

There’s definitely a lot of talk about SPACs these days. But the tried-and-true IPO is still the long-term liquidity goal for most tech startups. CEOs dream of ringing the bell on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, or seeing their face splashed across Nasdaq’s giant video screen in Times Square. Late last month, five high-profile tech companies filed on the same day to go public through traditional IPOs, presumably gunning to get out before the November election.

There is obviously a ton of operational, financial and regulatory preparation that goes into a successful initial public offering. But one aspect of IPO planning that often gets short shrift, particularly at B2B-focused companies chasing relatively niche buyer audiences, is branding and communications. As the head of marketing and communications for a big investment firm, I see this all the time. I believe companies who skimp here are throwing away significant equity value.

Simply put, a highly public financing event like an IPO is an enormous branding opportunity for most companies. It’s a free pass for companies to tell their stories to a huge, global audience and rack up high-level press coverage — both at the time of the IPO and in the future, since many publications (like my former employer, the Wall Street Journal) often focus on coverage of larger, publicly traded companies.

Why do so many companies fall down in this area? I think a lot of it has to do with the broader shift toward data-driven, online marketing and away from branding at many companies. Because highly technical companies in areas like hybrid-cloud computing or DevSecOps (yes, that’s a thing) often struggle in their early days to get journalists interested in their stories, they never make communications a priority inside the company. This comes back to haunt them when, all of the sudden, they’ve filed an S-1 and their exec team has zero experience explaining the company’s story in clear, persuasive terms to a general audience.

But smart companies can avoid this trap. Here are five ways you can get the most branding bang out of your tech IPO, no matter how arcane your company’s business is.

Don’t procrastinate

This is honestly the most important point to take away here. Successful PR and communications around an IPO are a result of long-term planning that starts at least 12 to 18 months before you file your offering document with the SEC. Once you think an IPO is in the offing, take a hard look at both your (1) marketing/communications staffing and (2) your existing digital footprint.

#b2b, #business, #column, #entrepreneurship, #growth-marketing, #initial-public-offering, #marketing, #startups, #tc, #verified-experts

0

#Hintergrund – Ein Startup, das akustische Probleme erkennt


Zu den vielen Startups, die man unbedingt im Blick behalten sollte, gehört das junge Unternehmen Seven Bel. Das Linzer Startup, das bereits 2018 von Thomas Rittenschober gegründet wurde, entwickelt eine Technologie zur Visualisierung von Schall. Lärmfotografie lautet hier das Schlagwort. Nach Abschluss der Pilotprojekte plant Seven Bel den Markteintritt im Sommer 2020. eQventure, AWS, FFG und der Startup-Inkubator tech2b investierten bereits in die Jungfirma.

Das Seven Bel-Team ist sich sicher, dass ihr System “das Potential hat, als Standard-Messinstrument flächendeckend in der Industrie zum Einsatz zu kommen”. Gründer Rittenschober: “In der Entwicklung unseres Messsystems wurde speziell darauf Wert gelegt, dass man schnell zu Ergebnissen gelangt. Bis akustische Messergebnisse vorliegen, dauert es mit unseren Instrumenten inklusive Aufbauzeit für das Messsystem weniger als fünf Minuten. Weitere Alleinstellungsmerkmale sind die hohe Bildqualität sowie die Einfachheit, mit der das System zu bedienen ist. Zusätzlich sprechen Mobilität und die hohe Kostenattraktivität im Vergleich zu Konkurrenzprodukten für Seven Bel”.

Die Schallscanner von Seven Bel stehen dabei in zwei Größen zur Verfügung: “Die längere Variante liefert Messergebnisse besonders für tieffrequenten Schall von industriell relevanten Applikationen, während die kürzere Variante sich auch in räumlich beengten Verhältnissen, wie zum Beispiel in Fahrzeugkabinen, einsetzen lässt”. Schon jetzt, also vor dem Markteintritt verfügt die Jungfirma über Kundenaufträge – etwa aus den Bereichen Automotive, Maschinen- und Anlagenbau sowie Haushaltsgeräte. Die Einsatzmöglichkeiten von Seven Bel dürften aber über die Branchen hinaus gehen. Wenn Unternehmen frühzeitig wissen, wo die Geräuschquelle bei einem Produkt liegt, kann dies eine Menge Geld sparen.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Seven Bel

#aktuell, #b2b, #industrialtech, #reloaded, #seven-bel

0

Dawn Capital closes another $400M fund to focus on B2B software

Dawn Capital, the London-based VC that focuses on B2B software, has closed its fourth and largest fund: $400 million that it plans to use to continue investing in early stage startups. Oversubscribed and closed (all remotely) within six months of launching in the midst of a global health pandemic, the news underscores how VCs — and their investors — continue to see opportunity in the region, despite the many uncertainties that hang over us right now.

“European founders are doing really well, with lots of good stories in our portfolio already, and they’re just getting better,” said Haakon Overli, Dawn’s co-founder and a general partner, in an interview.

Overli believes we’re in the beginning of a big wave in Europe, where we will see not just more promising B2B startups emerge, but more of them scale within Europe rather than decamp to the US, or sell early to a bigger rival.

Dawn’s focus is currently on four main areas: data and analytics, security, fintech and “the future of work” — all categories that have seen a significant fillip in recent months as companies are forced to rethink how they operate — with significantly more employees working remotely — and are investing in updated systems to do so. Dawn estimates that the B2B software market in Europe is currently worth some $1 trillion.

To date, Dawn has invested in some 40 companies, and some of the notable names in its portfolio include data analytics startup Collibra, IZettle (which was acquired by PayPal) and machine learning company Dataiku. Last year, it closed a $125 million “opportunities” fund to make growth-stage, later investments but this current fund will bring it back to focus on smaller investments of between $5 million and $20 million. Considering that this a $400 million fund, that likely means a sizeable volume of startups entering Dawn’s portfolio, setting the VC up to remain a steady and strong player in Europe for years to come.

“Innovation thrives on instability. System-wide shocks drive change that startups can exploit ruthlessly, while incumbents are incapable of adjusting,” said Dawn cofounder and GP Norman Fiore, in a statement. “Historically, these shocks were either financial, technological or societal. In 2020, we’ve had all three at once: technology shock as the cloud came into its own, financial shock which will force society to do more with less, and a fundamental change to the way our working society is organised. We can’t wait to see where our entrepreneurs take us as we invest Dawn IV and greatly appreciate the support of all our investors in making this a successful fundraise.”

#b2b, #dawn-capital, #europe, #european-vcs, #tc, #venture-capital

0

Edtech startups find demand from an unlikely customer: Public schools

School district technology budgets are tight. But Kami CEO and founder Hengjie Wang wanted to make his company’s digital classroom product a go-to tool anyway.

He landed on trying to disrupt the printers.

Wang found that school districts spend an average of $150,000 every year on printed materials. Kami helps teachers digitize worksheets so students can digitally annotate them. Doing the math, Wang says Kami can save districts an estimated $80,000 by getting rid of the need to print handouts every day.

“Districts are apprehensive on paying for tools unless you can also save them money at the same time,” Wang said. With this tactic, the number of school districts using Kami doubled between March and July, going from from 9,987 districts to 17,915 districts. Sales for the startup, which was founded in 2013, grew over 2,000%. Today, Kami is a cash-flow positive business that sells to schools and parents.

When it comes to wide-scale and equitable adoption for edtech startups, success can often hinge on landing contracts that extend to an entire school network. However, budget cuts and red tape have often limited a company’s ability to grow. During the pandemic, consumer edtech startups such as live tutoring or question and answer services have soared now that more kids are learning from home.

However, a second surge in edtech might be upon us. As schools seek to reopen with a hybrid learning solution, Kami and other startups are finding opportunity in one of the hardest institutions to sell to: K-12 school districts.

#b2b, #bradley-tusk, #caribu, #edtech, #education, #education-technology, #kami, #reach-capital, #shauntel-garvey, #startups, #tc, #tusk-ventures

0

#DealMonitor – Travel-Startup Omio sammelt 100 Millionen ein


Im aktuellen #DealMonitor für den 19. August werfen wir wieder einen Blick auf die wichtigsten, spannendsten und interessantesten Investments und Exits des Tages. Alle Deals der Vortage gibt es im großen und übersichtlichen #DealMonitor-Archiv.

INVESTMENTS

Omio
+++ Temasek, Kinnevik, Goldman Sachs, NEA und Kleiner Perkins investieren 100 Millionen US-Dollar in das Berliner Travel-Startup Omio. “Mit dem zusätzlichen Kapital kann sich Omio weiter auf seine Vision fokussieren, das globales Reisen für den Kunden so einfach wie möglich zu gestalten. Die Mittel sollen für das fortgesetzte organische Wachstum sowie opportunistische M&A-Aktivitäten verwendet werden, um so das einzigartige Produkt- und Dienstleistungsangebot des Unternehmens weiter zu stärken”, teilt das Startup mit. Omio gehört damit weiter zu den ganz großen Wetten in der Berliner Startup-Szene. In den vergangenen Jahren pumpten Investoren schon fast 300 Millionen Dollar in das Unternehmen, das früher als GoEuro bekannt war. Derzeit wirken 350 Mitarbeter für die Reiseplattform über die Nutzer Bahn-, Bus- sowie Flugtickets vergleichen und auch buchen können. Während der Corona-Krise dürfte die Jungfirma arg gelitten haben. Inzwischen sieht aber wieder gut aus bei Omio: “Insbesondere in Deutschland und Frankreich liegen wir trotz geringer Marketingausgaben bereits wieder bei über 50 Prozent verglichen mit unseren Buchungen vor Covid-19”.

Element 
+++ Sony Financial Ventures und der japanische Geldgeber Global Brain sowie Finleap, das Versorgungswerk der Zahnärztekammer Berlin und SBI Investment investieren 10 Millionen Euro in Element – siehe FinanceFWD. Signal Iduna, Finleap, Engel & Völkers Capital, SBI Investment und Alma Mundi Ventures investierten zuletzt 23 Millionen in Element, einen Zulieferer von digitalen Versicherungsprodukten. Zielgruppe der Jungfirma, die 2017 von Finleap angeschoben wurde, sind andere Startups, etablierte Unternehmen, Händler und auch bestehende Versicherer.

Siegfried Gin
+++ Der Spirituosenhersteller Diageo investiert über den unabhängigen Accelerator Distill Ventures in Rheinland Distillers, dem Unternehmen hinter Siegfried Rheinland Dry Gin. “Wie bei allen Unternehmen, die mit Distill Ventures zusammenarbeiten, bleiben die Gründer von Rheinland Distillers Mehrheitseigentümer, während Diageo eine Minderheitsbeteiligung hält”, teilt das Unternehmen mit. Rheinland Distillers wurde 2014 gegründet.

EXITS

BSI
Die Schweizer Beteiligungsgesellschaft Capvis übernimmt die Mehrheit an der Badener Firma BSI Business Systems Integration, einem Anbieter von Softwarelösungen für Customer Relationship Management (CRM). “Das BSI Team um Jens Thuesen, Christian Rusche und Markus Brunold bleibt investiert und setzt seine erfolgreiche Arbeit zusammen mit Capvis fort”, teilt das Unternehmen mit. BSI wurde 1996 in der Schweiz gegründet und beschäftigt über 320 Mitarbeiter an Standorten in Baar, Baden, Bern, Darmstadt, Düsseldorf, Hamburg, München und Zürich.

Achtung! Wir freuen uns über Tipps, Infos und Hinweise, was wir in unserem #DealMonitor alles so aufgreifen sollten. Schreibt uns eure Vorschläge entweder ganz klassisch per E-Mail oder nutzt unsere “Stille Post“, unseren Briefkasten für Insider-Infos.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): azrael74

#aktuell, #b2b, #berlin, #bsi, #capvis, #diageo, #distill-ventures, #element, #emasek, #finleap, #goldman-sachs, #insurtech, #kinnevik, #kleiner-perkins, #nea, #omio, #rheinland-distillers, #siegfried-gin, #travel, #venture-capital

0

#Interview – “Die Krise hat für uns als Wachstumsbooster hergehalten”


Beim Hamburger Startup Utry.me, das 2018 an den Start ging, können Onliner wie in einem ganz normalem Supermarkt einkaufen gehen. Mit einem Unterschied: Es gibt bei Utry.me keine Preise. Ein kleiner Ladebalken, der sich füllt, wenn man etwas in den Warenkorb packt, bestimmt, wie viele Produkte jeder Nutzer kaufen kann. “Wenn der Ladebalken voll ist, gehst du zur Kasse und bezahlst nur die Service und Versandgebühr von 24,90 Euro”, heißt es dazu auf der Website.

“Jeder FMCG-Hersteller hat bei uns die Möglichkeit, seine Produkte zu präsentieren. Die Community darf sich diese dann auswählen. Wir packen die Boxen zusammen und senden den Probanden ihre Probierboxen. Zudem verfolgen wir den Ansatz des FMCG-Entertainments. Für Endkunden soll Spaßmachen Teil von Utry.me zu sein. Und für Hersteller soll der entstehende Mehrwert aus Bekanntheit und präziser Markforschung ohne Streuverluste möglichst hoch sein”, erklärt Gründer André Moll das Konzept von Utry.me.

Im Interview mit deutsche-startups.de spricht der Utry.me-Macher außerdem über Glückstreffer, Weltreisen und festgefahrene Denkweisen.

Wie würdest Du Deiner Großmutter utry.me erklären?
Wir machen neue Produkte aus dem Supermarkt bekannt.

Hat sich das Konzept seit dem Start irgendwie verändert?
Das Grundkonzept hat sich nach nun zwei Jahren als “Glückstreffer” bewiesen, jedoch sind insbesondere auf B2B-Seite viele neue Features im Bereich der Marktforschung und Performance-Möglichkeiten hinzugekommen. Das heißt, dass das Modell in der jetzigen Form perspektivisch mehr und besser Chancen auf Wachstum hat.

Die Corona-Krise traf die Startup-Szene zuletzt hart. Wie habt ihr die Auswirkungen gespürt?
Wir hatten seit Beginn der Corona-Krise circa 100 % Wachstum. Man könnte sagen, dass die Krise für uns als Wachstumsbooster hergehalten hat. Das bedeutet, dass wir neue Mitarbeiter einstellen mussten bzw. konnten, unser Produktportfolio größer und breiter geworden ist, viele neue Partner u. Brands hinzukamen. Natürlich stieg damit aber auch der Druck. Um den Bedarf zu decken, musste nicht zuletzt auch ein deutlich größeres Lager beschafft werden. So traurig die Gesamtsituation für die Startup-Szene ist, sind wir so etwas wie ein “Gewinner” der Krise.

Wie ist überhaupt die Idee zu utry.me entstanden?
In meinen 20ern war ich mit einer Überraschungsbox unterwegs. Die fehlende Möglichkeit zur Skalierung sowie der fehlende Mehrwert für die Hersteller haben mich dazu bewogen den nächsten logischen Schritt im FMCG-Sampling zu gehen. Digital statt analog. Pull statt Push und vor allem: Community statt Abo. Zudem habe ich mich irgendwann gefragt, wieso die Menschen, mich miteingeschlossen, fast immer dasselbe aus dem Supermarkt kaufen. Ich stellte mir die Frage, wie man diese festgefahrene Denkweise ändern könnte. Kurzerhand entschloss ich mich, den Markt noch genauer zu untersuchen, konnte aber kein entsprechendes Angebot finden. Und so führte am Ende eins zum anderen.

Wie genau funktioniert eigentlich euer Geschäftsmodell?
Jeder FMCG-Hersteller hat bei uns die Möglichkeit, seine Produkte zu präsentieren. Die Community darf sich diese dann auswählen. Wir packen die Boxen zusammen und senden den Probanden ihre Probierboxen. Zudem verfolgen wir den Ansatz des FMCG-Entertainments. Für Endkunden soll Spaßmachen Teil von Utry.me zu sein. Und für Hersteller soll der entstehende Mehrwert aus Bekanntheit und präziser Markforschung ohne Streuverluste möglichst hoch sein.

Wie hat sich utry.me seit der Gründung entwickelt?
Wir sind sehr zufrieden mit der Entwicklung, nachdem das Konzept von Beginn an aufging. Sowohl Endkunden als auch Hersteller waren von Anfang an begeistert. Nun sind es mehr als 30.000 registrierte User und über 200 Hersteller, die wir zueinander führen. Auf beiden Seiten kommen täglich neue hinzu.

Nun aber einmal Butter bei die Fische: Wie groß ist utry.me inzwischen?
Als wir 2018 live gingen, sind wir mit 5.000 Euro gestartet, eigenfinanziert wohlgemerkt. Nun sind wir 10 Teammitglieder und vergrößern uns stetig. Daher sind wir auf der Suche nach neuen Mitarbeitern. Für 2021 haben wir uns vorgenommen, weiterhin ohne Fremdfinanzierung zu bleiben und die 2 Millionen Euro Umsatz im dritten Geschäftsjahr zu knacken.

Blicke bitte einmal zurück: Was ist in den vergangenen Jahren so richtig schief gegangen?
Meine erste Company, mit der ich Ende 20 vor dem Aus stand. Danach bin ich auf eine Weltreise gegangen und habe die Idee zu Utry.me konzipiert.

Und wo habt Ihr bisher alles richtig gemacht?
Bei der Auswahl der Partner und unserer Mitarbeiter. Wir pflegen bei uns ein sehr enges und familiäres Verhältnis. Erwähnenswert ist auch, dass wir bislang – trotz zahlreicher Anfragen – auf Inverstoren und Venture Capital Unternehmen, die bei Utry.me einsteigen wollten, verzichtet haben. Wir wachsen gesund und organisch, haben Kontrolle über alle Vorgänge und entwickeln uns noch besser als gedacht.

Wo steht utry.me in einem Jahr?
In einem stehen wir bei 100 000 Community-Mitgliedern und arbeiten mit mehr als 400 Herstellern zusammen, haben zwei- bis dreimal Mal so viele Mitarbeiter und können bestenfalls auch internationale Märkte bedienen.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): utry.me

#aktuell, #b2b, #hamburg, #interview, #reloaded, #utry-me

0

#Brandneu – 5 neue Startups, die jeder auf dem Schirm haben sollte


Jeden Tag entstehen überall in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz neue Startups. deutsche-startups.de präsentiert an dieser Stelle wieder einmal einige ganz junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Tagen, Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind sowie einige junge Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind und erstmals für Schlagzeilen gesorgt haben.

voize
Mit der App von voize können Pflegekräfte die Dokumentation ihrer täglichen Arbeit am Smartphone einsprechen. Das Startup generiert daraus “automatisch strukturierte Dokumenationseinträge” für die Pflegedokumentation. Das System wurde in Zusammenarbeit mit Pflegeeinrichtungen entwickelt.

URL: www.voize.de
Hashtags: #App #Pflege
Ort: Kornwestheim
Gründer: Fabio Schmidberger, Erik Ziegler, Marcel Schmidberger

artificial connect
Das Unternehmen artificial connect versorgt Redaktionen mit “automatisierten Textzusammenfassungen”. Die Zusammenfassungen werden dabei sogar “auf die Spezifika einzelner Medienkanäle optimiert, um eine größtmögliche Nähe zur Zielgruppe aufzubauen”.

URL: www.artificial-connect.com
Hashtags: #Tool #KI
Ort: Hannover
Gründer: Felix Rolf, Alex Divivi

Herodikos
Das Startup Herodikos bietet “Individuelle medizinische Bewegungstherapie” per App an. Konkret geht es um die Behandlung von Volkskrankheiten wie Rücken- oder Knieschmerz. Ärzte und Therapeuten solle ihre Patienten so “individuell und somit wirksam versorgen” können.

URL: www.herodikos.de
Hashtags:#eHealth #App
Ort: Varel
Gründer: Lasse Schulte-Güstenberg, Eva Schobert, Jan Penning

Edgeless Systems
Das Bochumer Unternehmen Edgeless Systems entwickelt eine “hochsichere relationale Datenbank für die Cloud”. Durch eine Kombination aus “sicherer Hardware und innovativem Software-Engineering” verspricht das Startup dabei “echte Ende-zu-Ende Verschlüsselung und Verifizierbarkeit”.

URL: www.edgeless.systems
Hashtags: #Software
Ort: Bochum
Gründer: Felix Schuster, Thomas Tendyck

Wunder Industries
Das junge Startup Wunder Industries kümmert sich um das Thema “Angebotserstellung für Auftragsfertiger”. Das Gründer-Trio entwickelt ganz konkret eine intelligente Angebotssoftware für mittelständische Auftragsfertiger. Individuelle Angebote sollen so in ganz kurzer Zeit möglich sein.

URL: www.wunder.industries
Hashtags: #Tool #B2B
Ort: Hamburg
Gründer: Tim Dethlefsen, Viktor Kessler und Alex Sandau

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über junge, frische und brandneue Startups, die noch nicht jeder kennt. Alle diese Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der bundesweiten Startup-Szene und im besten Fall auf die Agenda von Investoren, Unternehmen und potenziellen Kooperationspartnern. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #artificial-connect, #bochum, #brandneu, #edgeless-systems, #hamburg, #herodikos, #startup-radar, #voize, #wunder-industries

0

#Brandneu – 5 neue Startups, die gerade so richtig losrocken


Jeden Tag entstehen überall in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz neue Startups. deutsche-startups.de präsentiert an dieser Stelle wieder einmal einige ganz junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Tagen, Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind sowie einige junge Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind und erstmals für Schlagzeilen gesorgt haben.

Knowunity
Bei Knowunity dreht sich alles um Schulwissen. Das Startup tritt an, um den Schulalltag durch Präsentationen, Karteikarten, Buchzusammenfassungen und Nachhilfe zu vereinfachen will. Den jungen Gründern schwebt eine “Art Spotify für den Schulalltag” vor.

URL: www.knowunity.de
Hashtags: #App #EdTech #eLearning
Ort: Stuttgart
Gründer: Lars Lins, Benedict Kurz, Julian Prigl

Tough Design
Bei Tough Design finden Onliner Rucksäcke, Aktentaschen und Accessoires aus sogenanntem Vollnarbenleder. Das junge Unternehmen, das von Yusuf Zorlu geführt wird, möchte sich vor allem als Anlaufstelle “für deutsche Qualität und die stilsichere Mode aus Düsseldorf” etablieren.

URL: www.tough-design.com
Hashtags:#eCommerce
Ort: Düsseldorf
Gründer: Yusuf Zorlu

CNC One
Bei CNC One wird gefräst – und zwar ordentlich. Das Startup bietet eine CNC-Fräsmaschine für den Hausgebrauch an. “Automated workflows and free video tutorials empower even beginners to machine beautiful products from Day One”, teilt die Jungfirma aus München mit.

URL: www.cncone.de
Hashtags: #Hardware
Ort: München
Gründer: Sven Rittberger, Filip Simic

Advise Media Consulting
Das Hamburger Startup Advise Media Consulting verspricht eine “neue Ära im Media Auditing”. Die Jungfirma bietet ihren Kunden eine Plattform, mit der “sowohl lokale als auch internationale Pitch-, Tracking- und Monitoringprojekte zentral gesteuert, neutral analysiert und optimiert werden können”..

URL: www.advise-mc.com
Hashtags: #AdTech
Ort: Hamburg
Gründer: Marino Vukovic, Rolf-Dieter Wulf

Kimoknow
Das junge Unternehmen Kimoknow, eine Ausgründung des KIT, entwickelt digitale Montageassistenten. In der Selbstbeschreibung heißt es: “Ohne spezielle Kenntnisse können Objekte antrainiert werden. Dies wird automatisch von unserem Algorithmen übernommen”.

URL: www.kimoknow.de
Hashtags: #IndustrialTech #B2B
Ort: Karlsruhe
Gründer: Lukas Kriete, Roman Wiegand, Aaron Boll, Michael Grethler, Vesa Klumpp

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über junge, frische und brandneue Startups, die noch nicht jeder kennt. Alle diese Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der bundesweiten Startup-Szene und im besten Fall auf die Agenda von Investoren, Unternehmen und potenziellen Kooperationspartnern. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#advise-media-consulting, #aktuell, #brandneu, #cnc-one, #dusseldorf, #hamburg, #karlsruhe, #kimoknow, #knowunity, #munchen, #startup-radar, #stuttgart, #tough-design

0

#Brandneu – 5 neue Startups, die man sich unbedingt ansehen sollte


Jeden Tag entstehen überall in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz neue Startups. deutsche-startups.de präsentiert an dieser Stelle wieder einmal einige ganz junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Tagen, Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind sowie einige junge Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind und erstmals für Schlagzeilen gesorgt haben.

Framence
Mit Framence kann man digitale Zwillinge von Gebäude und Anlagen bauen – und zwar innerhalb kürzester Zeit. Auf der Website heißt es dazu: “Der User kann sich jederzeit per Browser zum gewünschten Ort klicken, um den aktuellen Zustand seiner Gebäude und Anlagen zu überprüfen”.

URL: www.framence.com
Hashtags: #VirtualReality #PropTech
Ort: Bensheim
Gründer: Peter Merkel, Adrian Merkel

emlen
Auf der Startseite von emlen steht: “It’s time to start activating your content”. Das Startup positioniert sich als cloud-basierte “Content-Engagement-Software”. Mit emlen können Unternehmen “den ROI von Inhalten bestimmen und gleichzeitig die Interaktion mit ihren Kontakten fördern”.

URL: www.beta.emlen.io
Hashtags: #Software #Marketing
Ort: Saarbrücken, Berlin
Gründer: Marc Grewenig, Max Ulbrich

ai-omatic
Der Slogan von ai-omatic lautet: “Data Science Lösungen – auch ohne Data Scientist”. Das Startup setzt somit auf Unternehmen als Zielgruppe. Diese haben mit ai-omatic die Möglichkeit, Daten in Wissen umzuwandeln. Dies soll unter anderem über “automatische Texterkennung” gelingen.

URL: www.ai-omatic.com
Hashtags: #BigData #B2B
Ort: Hamburg
Gründer: Lena Weirauch, Dario Ramming, Felix Kraft

cleverklagen
Das LegalTech cleverklagen, hinter dem Rechtsanwalt Lucas Rößler steckt, kämpft um die Abfindungen von Menschen, die ihren Job verloren haben. “Aus Erfahrung wissen wir, dass viele Arbeitnehmer aus Angst vor den Kosten nicht zum Anwalt gehen”, heißt es auf der Website.

URL: www.cleverklagen.de
Hashtags: #LegalTech
Ort: Berlin
Gründer: Lucas Rößler

Parklab
Parklab positioniert sich als “intelligente Parklösung”. Im Grunde geht es darum, die Parkplatzsuche zu digitalisieren. Das Team teilt dazu selbstbewusst mit: “Auf diese Weise sind wir für Städte, Kommunen, Unternehmen und Verkehrsverwaltungen die Anlaufstelle auf dem Weg zu einer intelligenten Stadt”.

URL: wwww.parklab.app
Hashtags: #App #Mobility
Ort: Duisburg
Gründer: Kadir Oluz, Luthan Magat, Maximilian Knöfel

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über junge, frische und brandneue Startups, die noch nicht jeder kennt. Alle diese Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der bundesweiten Startup-Szene und im besten Fall auf die Agenda von Investoren, Unternehmen und potenziellen Kooperationspartnern. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#ai-omatic, #aktuell, #berlin, #brandneu, #cleverklagen, #duisburg, #emlen, #framence, #hamburg, #parklab, #startup-radar

0

All B2B startups are in the payments business

The COVID-19 pandemic has forced businesses to rethink how they accept and make payments. Paper invoices, checks and point-of-sale payments have given way to “corona-free payments” through mobile apps, electronic invoicing and ACH. Although significant, this is the sideshow to a more significant reshuffling of the payments industry.

Nearly $150 trillion in worldwide B2B and B2C transactions take place every year, but only a tiny portion are digital. A lot of technology companies want their piece of that massive pie. Until recently, though, only payment facilitators (aka, “payfacs”), gateways, banks and credit card companies had access to it.

That’s changing. Whether they know it yet or not, B2B tech platforms are becoming payments companies. Payfacs are competing to integrate their technology into these platforms, which drive an ever-growing number of transactions. Revenue-sharing deals are on the table, and payfacs are pushing the competitive advantages they can offer to the clients of these B2B platforms. Capabilities like cross-border payments, seamless customer onboarding, fraud protection, marketplace payments and B2B invoicing influence, which payfacs win in “integrated payments” (the jargon for this space) and which don’t.

B2B companies that use to leave the choice of gateway to their clients need to become savvy in payment technology, both to control the user experience and to tap this new business. There’s a massive amount of revenue on the table, and it’s just too easy to blow this opportunity and alienate clients in the process.

How we arrived here

A decade ago, the revolution in cloud computing led to a wave of B2B tech platforms promising to “disrupt” every industry. G