Accused Capital One Hacker Stands Trial for Fraud and Identity Theft

A woman is accused of downloading data of more than 100 million Capital One customers. Her lawyers argue a conviction would criminalize legitimate research practices.

#amazon-com-inc, #capital-one-financial-corporation, #computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #cyberattacks-and-hackers, #justice-department, #seattle-wash, #thompson-paige-adele

‘Quantum Internet’ Inches Closer With Advance in Data Teleportation

Scientists have improved their ability to send quantum information across distant computers — and have taken another step toward the network of the future.

#computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #delft-netherlands, #delft-university-of-technology, #hefei-china, #nature-journal, #physics, #quantum-computing, #quantum-theory, #your-feed-science

Tina Peters, G.O.P. Colorado Secretary of State Candidate, Is Barred From Overseeing Elections

A judge ruled that Tina Peters, a pro-Trump Republican accused of tampering with voting equipment in Mesa County, had “committed a neglect of duty.”

#colorado, #computer-security, #conspiracy-theories, #elections-secretary-of-state, #ethics-and-official-misconduct, #grand-junction-colo, #griswold-jena, #mesa-county-colo, #peters-tina, #presidential-election-of-2020, #primaries-and-caucuses, #voter-fraud-election-fraud, #voting-machines

Text Spam Is on the Rise. Here’s How to Spot It and What to Do

Text spam is on the rise. The latest version involves scammers sending messages to you seemingly from your own phone number. Here’s what to do.

#att-inc, #cellular-telephones, #computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #content-type-service, #frauds-and-swindling, #mobile-applications, #smartphones, #spam-electronic, #t-mobile-us-inc, #telemarketing, #text-messaging, #verizon-communications-inc, #wireless-communications

Hackers’ Fake Claims of Ukrainian Surrender Aren’t Fooling Anyone. So What’s Their Goal?

Experts say the hackers’ intentions might not be to actually trick anyone, but to erode confidence in Ukrainian media outlets and institutions.

#belarus, #computer-security, #cyberwarfare-and-defense, #facebook-inc, #news-and-news-media, #rumors-and-misinformation, #russia, #russian-invasion-of-ukraine-2022, #ukraine, #war-and-armed-conflicts, #zelensky-volodymyr

U.S. Accuses 4 Russians of Hacking Infrastructure, Including Nuclear Plant

The announcement covered hackings from 2012 to 2018, but served as yet another warning from the Biden administration of Russia’s ability to conduct such operations.

#biden-joseph-r-jr, #computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #cyberwarfare-and-defense, #federal-bureau-of-investigation, #federal-security-service, #justice-department, #kansas, #monaco-lisa-o, #russia, #saudi-arabia

Poland Wins European Tree of the Year After Russia Is Banned

After Russia was banned from the European Tree of the Year competition, organizers reflected on how a celebration of trees became tangled up in global politics.

#belarus, #computer-security, #europe, #european-parliament, #great-britain, #poland, #politics-and-government, #russia, #russian-invasion-of-ukraine-2022, #santiago-de-compostela-spain, #spain, #trees-and-shrubs, #turgenev-ivan, #ukraine, #war-and-armed-conflicts, #world-heritage-sites

With Eye to Russia, Biden Administration Asks Companies to Report Cyberattacks

A new law requires companies to tell the federal government about hacks, but the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency still has to work out the details of what must be reported.

#computer-security, #cyberattacks-and-hackers, #cybersecurity-and-infrastructure-security-agency, #cyberwarfare-and-defense, #easterly-jen, #law-and-legislation, #russia, #united-states-politics-and-government

Yes, You Can Make Your Tech Survive Obsolescence

Our gadgets eventually become outdated, but here are workarounds to keep them alive and secure past when manufacturers say.

#computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #content-type-service, #linux-operating-system, #mobile-applications, #open-source-software, #software, #web-browsers

I.R.S. Will Allow Taxpayers to Forgo Facial Recognition Amid Blowback

The agency, dealing with controversy over its decision to use facial recognition software, said it would allow taxpayers to authenticate their accounts with a live, virtual interview.

#computer-security, #facial-recognition-software, #federal-taxes-us, #idme-inc, #internal-revenue-service, #privacy, #tax-preparers-and-preparation

Kazakhstan’s Internet Shutdowns Could Be a Warning for Ukraine

Control of the internet is increasingly part of any modern conflict.

#censorship, #computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #cyberwarfare-and-defense, #kazakhstan, #mobile-applications, #politics-and-government, #telephones-and-telecommunications, #ukraine, #war-and-armed-conflicts

2020 Election Denier Will Run for Top Elections Position in Colorado

Tina Peters, the Mesa County clerk, has been stripped of her county election oversight but is seeking to oversee her state’s elections as secretary of state.

#bannon-stephen-k, #biden-joseph-r-jr, #colorado, #computer-security, #ethics-and-official-misconduct, #griswold-jena, #mesa-county-colo, #presidential-election-of-2020, #republican-party, #search-and-seizure, #tina-peters, #trump-donald-j, #united-states-politics-and-government, #voter-fraud-election-fraud, #voting-machines

I.R.S. to End Use of Facial Recognition for Identity Verification

The tax collection agency will transition away from using a service from the authentication service ID.me amid bipartisan backlash.

#computer-security, #computer-vision, #facial-recognition-software, #internal-revenue-service, #rettig-charles-p, #senate, #united-states-politics-and-government

U.S. Sends Official to Help NATO Brace for Russian Cyberattacks

Intelligence assessments suggest that a Russian invasion of Ukraine would most likely be preceded by cyberattacks on Ukraine’s electric grid, its communications systems and its government.

#computer-security, #cyberwarfare-and-defense, #neuberger-anne, #north-atlantic-treaty-organization, #russia, #ukraine, #united-states-international-relations

China’s Olympics App for Athletes Has Security Flaws, Study Says

Researchers said the app, which will store sensitive health data on participants at the Winter Games, has serious encryption vulnerabilities.

#china, #citizen-lab, #computer-security, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #mobile-applications, #olympic-games-2022, #surveillance-of-citizens-by-government

Ransomware Group REvil Dismantled in Raids, Russia Says

Moscow said the ransomware group REvil “ceased to exist” after raids and arrests. It is not clear if the operation will ease tensions with Washington.

#biden-joseph-r-jr, #computer-security, #cyberattacks-and-hackers, #cyberwarfare-and-defense, #extortion-and-blackmail, #federal-security-service, #putin-vladimir-v, #revil-hacking-group, #russia, #ukraine

We’re All ‘Experts’ Now. That’s Not a Good Thing.

Widespread scams and institutional failures force us to rely on only ourselves.

#computer-security, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #frauds-and-swindling, #internal-sub-only-nl, #oz-mehmet-c, #ponzi-and-pyramid-schemes, #rumors-and-misinformation, #subprime-mortgage-crisis

Biden Administration Warns Against Spyware Targeting Dissidents

The U.S. intelligence community offered steps that would mitigate — but not stop — spyware developed by firms like the NSO Group.

#computer-security, #cyberattacks-and-hackers, #national-counterintelligence-and-security-center, #nso-group, #smartphones, #software, #surveillance-of-citizens-by-government, #united-states-politics-and-government

Someone Offered ‘Harvard’ Jobs to Known Women in India. It Was a Scam.

For over a year, prominent women in India, including journalists, were reeled into a labyrinthine online scam, offering work with Harvard University. Who targeted them, and why, is a mystery.

#anand-bharat-n, #bharatiya-janata-party, #computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #harvard-university, #hoaxes-and-pranks, #impostors-criminal, #news-and-news-media

Microsoft Seizes 42 Websites From a Chinese Hacking Group

The group was likely using the websites to install malware that helped it gather data from government agencies and other groups, the company said.

#china, #computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #cyberwarfare-and-defense, #microsoft-corp

Companies Linked to Russian Ransomware Hide in Plain Sight

Cybersecurity experts tracing money paid by American businesses to Russian ransomware gangs found it led to one of Moscow’s most prestigious addresses.

#computer-security, #cyberwarfare-and-defense, #darkside-hacking-group, #evil-corp-russian-hacking-group, #extortion-and-blackmail, #federation-towers-moscow-russia, #moscow-russia, #politics-and-government, #recorded-future-inc, #virtual-currency

Israeli Company’s Spyware Is Used to Target U.S. Embassy Employees in Africa

The hack is the first known case of the spyware, known as Pegasus, being used against American officials.

#computer-security, #cyberattacks-and-hackers, #diplomatic-service-embassies-and-consulates, #israel, #nso-group, #smartphones, #uganda, #united-states-international-relations

Israel and Iran Broaden Cyberwar to Attack Civilian Targets

Iranians couldn’t buy gas. Israelis found their intimate dating details posted online. The Iran-Israel shadow war is now hitting ordinary citizens.

#automobile-service-and-charging-stations, #check-point-software-technologies-ltd, #computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #cyberwarfare-and-defense, #defense-and-military-forces, #embargoes-and-sanctions, #international-relations, #iran, #isfahan-iran, #israel, #khamenei-ali, #oil-petroleum-and-gasoline, #online-dating, #politics-and-government, #tehran-iran, #telegram-llc

Apple Sues Israeli Spyware Maker NSO Group

Apple accused NSO Group, the Israeli surveillance company, of “flagrant” violations of its software, as well as federal and state laws.

#apple-inc, #citizen-lab, #cloud-computing, #computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #espionage-and-intelligence-services, #facebook-inc, #icloud, #industrial-espionage, #lookout-inc, #nso-group, #software, #suits-and-litigation-civil, #surveillance-of-citizens-by-government

Alan Paller, a Mover on Cybersecurity Threat, Is Dead at 76

He made it his mission to find, recruit and develop the next generation of digital warriors to defend the nation against an onslaught of cyberattacks.

#computer-security, #cyberwarfare-and-defense, #deaths-obituaries, #paller-alan-1945-2021, #sans-institute, #united-states-defense-and-military-forces

Palestinian Diplomats Targeted by Israeli Spyware, Official Says

The accusation, which has not been independently verified, raises new questions over whether Israel is using software made by NSO Group to spy on Palestinians.

#computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #cyberattacks-and-hackers, #cyberwarfare-and-defense, #espionage-and-intelligence-services, #israel, #jerusalem-israel, #nso-group, #palestinians, #politics-and-government, #shin-bet, #surveillance-of-citizens-by-government, #united-states

I Was Hacked. The Spyware Used Against Me Makes Us All Vulnerable.

Invasive hacking software sold to countries to fight terrorism is easily abused. Researchers say my phone was hacked twice, probably by Saudi Arabia.

#al-jazeera, #cellular-telephones, #citizen-lab, #computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #israel, #mohammed-bin-salman-1985, #nso-group, #privacy, #saudi-arabia, #signal-open-whisper-systems, #surveillance-of-citizens-by-government, #text-messaging

A Rare Win in the Cat-and-Mouse Game of Ransomware

A team of private security sleuths, in their first public detailing of their efforts, discuss how they used cybercriminals’ mistakes to quietly help victims recover their data.

#blackmatter, #computer-security, #cyberattacks-and-hackers, #cybersecurity-and-infrastructure-security-agency, #emsisoft-ltd, #extortion-and-blackmail

The Sheikh, the Businessman and a Hacking Mystery on 3 Continents

A case that began with a feud in the United Arab Emirates, stretched from the U.S. to India and is now playing out in the British courts offers a rare glimpse into the anatomy of a hack-and-leak operation.

#al-qasimi-saud-bin-saqr-1956, #azima-farhad-1942, #belltrox-infotech-services-pvt-ltd, #computer-security, #cyberattacks-and-hackers, #cyberroot-risk-advisory-pvt-ltd, #great-britain, #massaad-khater, #news-sources-confidential-status-of, #politics-and-government, #ras-al-khaimah-united-arab-emirates, #suits-and-litigation-civil

Submarine Spy Case: Couple Stewed Over Money and Politics

Jonathan and Diana Toebbe, charged with trying to sell classified nuclear secrets to a foreign power, struggled with finances, family and the state of America.

#computer-security, #content-type-personal-profile, #espionage-and-intelligence-services, #federal-bureau-of-investigation, #laboratories-and-scientific-equipment, #nuclear-energy, #submarines-and-submersibles, #toebbe-diana, #toebbe-jonathan, #united-states-defense-and-military-forces, #washington-navy-yard-washington-dc

Couple in Submarine Spy Case Stewed Over Money and Politics

Jonathan and Diana Toebbe, charged with trying to sell classified nuclear secrets to a foreign power, struggled with finances, family and the state of America.

#computer-security, #content-type-personal-profile, #espionage-and-intelligence-services, #federal-bureau-of-investigation, #laboratories-and-scientific-equipment, #nuclear-energy, #submarines-and-submersibles, #toebbe-diana, #toebbe-jonathan, #united-states-defense-and-military-forces, #washington-navy-yard-washington-dc

Governor Accuses Reporter of Hacking After Flaws in State Website Are Revealed

Gov. Mike Parson of Missouri has asked for a criminal investigation of a St. Louis Post-Dispatch reporter who told the state that a website revealed teachers’ Social Security numbers.

#computer-security, #cyberattacks-and-hackers, #missouri, #news-and-news-media, #newspapers, #parson-michael-l, #renaud-josh-journalist, #st-louis-post-dispatch, #teachers-and-school-employees

Cybersecurity Experts Sound Alarm on Apple and E.U. Phone Scanning Plans

A group of researchers said the “dangerous technology” was invasive and not effective at detecting images of child sexual abuse.

#apple-inc, #child-pornography, #cloud-computing, #computer-security, #european-union, #icloud, #privacy, #research, #surveillance-of-citizens-by-government

It’s Time to Stop Paying for a VPN

Many virtual private network services that were meant to protect your web browsing can no longer be trusted. Here are other ways.

#cloud-computing, #computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #content-type-service, #mergers-acquisitions-and-divestitures, #news-sources-confidential-status-of, #privacy, #wireless-communications

How to Find ‘Stalkerware’ on Your Devices

These spyware apps record your conversations, location and everything you type, all while camouflaged as a calculator or calendar.

#android-operating-system, #apple-inc, #calculators, #computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #content-type-service, #data-mining-and-database-marketing, #domestic-violence, #google-inc, #iphone, #mobile-applications, #privacy, #smartphones, #software, #stalking-crime

Stairwell secures $20M Series A to help organizations outsmart attackers

Back when Stairwell emerged from stealth in 2020, the startup was shrouded in secrecy. Now with $20 million in Series A funding, its founder and CEO Mike Wiacek — who previously served as chief security officer at Chronicle, Google’s moonshot cybersecurity company — is ready to talk.

As well as raising $20M, an investment round co-led by Sequoia Capital and Accel, Stairwell is launching Inception, a threat hunting platform that aims to help organizations determine if they were compromised now or in the past. Unlike other threat detection platforms, Inception takes an “inside out” approach to cybersecurity, which starts by looking inwards at a company’s data.

“This helps you study what’s in your environment first before you start thinking about what’s happening in the outside world,” Wiacek tells TechCrunch. “The beautiful thing about that approach is that’s not information that outside parties, a.k.a. the bad guys, are privy to.”

This data, all of which is treated as suspicious, is continuously evaluated in light of new indicators and new threat intelligence. Stairwell claims this enables organizations to detect anomalies within just days, rather than the industry average of 280 days, as well as to “bootstrap” future detections.

“If you go and buy a threat intelligence feed from Vendor X, do you really think that someone who’s spending hundreds of thousands, or even millions of dollars to conduct an offensive campaign isn’t going to make sure that whatever they’re using isn’t in that field?,” said Wiacek. “They know what McAfee knows and they know other antivirus engines know, but they don’t know what you know and that’s a very powerful advantage that you have there.”

Stairwell’s $20 million in Series A funding, which comes less than 12 months after it secured $4.5 million in seed funding, will be used to further advance the Inception platform and to increase the startup’s headcount; the Palo Alto-based firm currently has a modest headcount of 21.

The Inception platform, which the startup claims finally enables enterprises to “outsmart the bad guys”, is launching in early release for a limited number of customers, with full general availability scheduled for 2022.

“I just wish we had a product to market when SolarWinds happened,” Wiacek added.

#accel, #anomali, #ceo, #computer-security, #computing, #google-cloud, #inception, #information-technology, #mcafee, #palo-alto, #security, #sequoia-capital, #solarwinds, #stairwell, #system-administration

America Is Being Held for Ransom. It Needs to Fight Back.

Businesses attacked. Data stolen. Miles of pipeline shut down. The scourge of ransomware is worse than ever.

#biden-joseph-r-jr, #computer-security, #cyberattacks-and-hackers, #putin-vladimir-v, #revil-hacking-group, #russia

Web host Epik was warned of a critical website bug weeks before it was hacked

Hackers associated with the hacktivist collective Anonymous say they have leaked gigabytes of data from Epik, a web host and domain registrar that provides services to far-right sites like Gab, Parler and 8chan, which found refuge in Epik after they were booted from mainstream platforms.

In a statement attached to a torrent file of the dumped data this week, the group said the 180 gigabytes amounts to a “decade’s worth” of company data, including “all that’s needed to trace actual ownership and management” of the company. The group claimed to have customer payment histories, domain purchases and transfers, and passwords, credentials, and employee mailboxes. The cache of stolen data also contains files from the company’s internal web servers, and databases that contain customer records for domains that are registered with Epik.

The hackers did not say how they obtained the breached data or when the hack took place, but timestamps on the most recent files suggest the hack likely happened in late February.

Epik initially told reporters it was unaware of a breach, but an email sent out by founder and chief executive Robert Monster on Wednesday alerted users to an “alleged security incident.”

TechCrunch has since learned that Epik was warned of a critical security flaw weeks before its breach.

Security researcher Corben Leo contacted Epik’s chief executive Monster over LinkedIn in January about a security vulnerability on the web host’s website. Leo asked if the company had a bug bounty or a way to report the vulnerability. LinkedIn showed Monster had read the message but did not respond.

Leo told TechCrunch that a library used on Epik’s WHOIS page for generating PDF reports of public domain records had a decade-old vulnerability that allowed anyone to remotely run code directly on the internal server without any authentication, such as a company password.

“You could just paste this [line of code] in there and execute any command on their servers,” Leo told TechCrunch.

Leo ran a proof-of-concept command from the public-facing WHOIS page to ask the server to display its username, which confirmed that code could run on Epik’s internal server, but he did not test to see what access the server had as doing so would be illegal.

It’s not known if the Anonymous hacktivists used the same vulnerability that Leo discovered. (Part of the stolen cache also includes folders relating to Epik’s WHOIS system, but the hacktivists left no contact information and could not be reached for comment.) But Leo contends that if a hacker exploited the same vulnerability and the server had access to other servers, databases or systems on the network, that access could have allowed access to the kind of data stolen from Epik’s internal network in February.

“I am really guessing that’s how they got owned,” Leo told TechCrunch, who confirmed that the flaw has since been fixed.

Monster confirmed he received Leo’s message on LinkedIn, but did not answer our questions about the breach or say when the vulnerability was patched. “We get bounty hunters pitching their services. I probably just thought it was one of those,” said Monster. “I am not sure if I actioned it. Do you answer all your LinkedIn spams?”

#8chan, #computer-security, #computing, #cyberspace, #cyberwarfare, #epik, #gab, #parler, #rob-monster, #security, #texas, #world-wide-web

Ransomware: A market problem deserves a market solution

REvil is a solid choice for a villain’s name: R Evil. Revil. Evil and yet fun. I could imagine Black Widow, Hulk and Spider-Man teaming up to topple the leadership of REvil Incorporated.

The criminal gang using the name REvil may have enabled ransomware attacks on thousands of small businesses worldwide this summer — but the ransomware problem is bigger than REvil, LockBit or DarkSide. REvil has disappeared from the internet, but the ransomware problem persists.

REvil is a symptom, not the cause. I advise Tony Stark and his fellow Avengers to look past any one criminal organization — because there is no evil mastermind. Ransomware is just the latest in the 50,000-year evolution of petty criminals discovering get-rich-quick schemes.

The massive boom in the number of ransomware occurrences arises from the lack of centralized control. More than 304 million ransomware attacks hit global businesses last year, with costs surpassing $178,000 per event. Technology has created a market where countless petty criminals can make good money fast. The best way to fight this kind of threat is with a market-based approach.

The spike in global ransomware attacks reflects a massive “dumbing down” of criminal activity. People looking to make an illicit buck have many more options available to them today than they did even two years ago. Without technical chops, people can steal your data, hold it for ransom and coerce you to pay to get it back. Law enforcement has not yet responded to combat this form of cybercrime, and large, sophisticated criminal networks have likewise not yet figured out how to control the encroaching upstarts.

The spike in ransomware attacks is attributable to the “as a service” economy. In this case, we’re talking about RaaS, or ransomware as a service. This works because each task in the ransomware chain benefits from the improved sophistication enabled by the division of labor and specialization.

Someone finds a vulnerable target. Someone provides bulletproof infrastructure outside of the jurisdiction of responsible law enforcement. Someone provides the malicious code. The players all come together without knowing each other’s names. No need to meet in person as Mr. Pink, Mr. Blonde and Mr. Orange because the ability to coordinate tasks has become simple. The rapid pace of technological innovation created a decentralized market, enabling amateurs to engage in high-dollar crimes.

There’s a gig economy for the underworld just like there is for the legal business world. I’ve built two successful software companies, even though I’m an economist. I use open source software and rent infrastructure via cloud technologies. I operated my first software company for six years before I sought outside capital, and I used that money for marketing and sales more than technology.

This tech advancement is both good and bad. The global economy did better than expected during a global pandemic because technology enabled many people to work from anywhere.

But the illicit markets of crime also benefited. REvil provided a service — a piece of a larger network — and earned a share of proceeds from ransomware attacks committed by others — like Jeff Bezos and Amazon get a share of my company’s revenues for the services they provide to me.

To fight ransomware attacks, appreciate the economics — the markets that enable ransomware — and change the market dynamics. Specifically, do three things:

1. Analyze the market like a business executive

Any competitive business thinks about what’s allowing competitors to succeed and how they can outcompete. The person behind a ransomware strike is an entrepreneur or a worker in a firm engaged in cybercrime, so start with good business analytics using data and smart business questions.

Can the crypto technologies that enable the crime also be used to enable entity resolution and deny anonymity/pseudonymity? Can technology undermine a criminal’s ability to recruit, coordinate or move, store and spend the proceeds from criminal activities?

2. Define victory in market terms

Doing the analytics to understand competing firms allows one to more clearly see the market for ransomware. Eliminating one “firm” often creates a power vacuum that will be filled by another, provided the market remains the same.

REvil disappeared, but ransomware attacks persist. Victory in market terms means creating markets in which criminals choose not to engage in the activity in the first place. The goal is not to catch criminals, but to deter the crime. Victory against ransomware happens when arrests drop because attempted attacks drop to near zero.

3. Combat RaaS as an entrepreneur in a competitive market

To prevent ransomware is to fight against criminal entrepreneurs, so the task requires one to think and fight crime like an entrepreneur.

Crime-fighting entrepreneurs require collaboration — networks of government officials, banking professionals and technologists in the private sector across the globe must come together.

Through artificial intelligence and machine learning, the capability to securely share data, information and knowledge while preserving privacy exists. The tools of crime become the tools to combat crime.

No evil mastermind sits in their lair laughing at the chaos inflicted on the economy. Instead, growing numbers of amateurs are finding ways to make money quickly. Tackling the ransomware industry requires the same coordinated focus on the market that enabled amateurs to enter cybercrime in the first place. Iron Man would certainly agree.

#column, #computer-security, #crime, #cybercrime, #machine-learning, #malware, #open-source-software, #ransomware, #security, #security-breaches, #tc

Don’t get Bezosed

A spyware flaw, Elizabeth Holmes and my latest Facebook alert.

#bush-cori, #carreyrou-john, #computer-security, #cyberattacks-and-hackers, #internal-sub-only, #surveillance-of-citizens-by-government, #wearable-computing

Apple Security Update Closes Spyware Flaw in iPhones, Macs and iWatches

Researchers at Citizen Lab found that NSO Group, an Israeli spyware company, had infected Apple products without so much as a click.

#ahmed-azam, #amnesty-international, #apple-inc, #citizen-lab, #computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #cyberattacks-and-hackers, #cyberwarfare-and-defense, #defective-products, #hubbard-ben, #human-rights-and-human-rights-violations, #iphone, #israel, #mohammed-bin-salman-1985, #nso-group, #privacy, #signal-open-whisper-systems, #software, #text-messaging, #university-of-toronto

BitSight raises $250M from Moody’s and acquires cyber risk startup VisibleRisk

BitSight, a startup that assesses the likelihood that an organization will be breached, has received a $250 million investment from credit rating giant Moody’s, and acquired Israeli cyber risk assessment startup VisibleRisk for an undisclosed sum.

Boston-based BitSight says the investment from Moody’s, which has long warned that cyber risk can impact credit ratings, will enable it to create a cybersecurity risk platform, while the credit ratings giant said it plans to make use of BitSight’s cyber risk data and research across its integrated risk assessment product offerings.

The investment values BitSight at $2.4 billion and makes Moody’s the largest shareholder in the company.

“Creating transparency and enabling trust is at the core of Moody’s mission,” Moody’s president and CEO Rob Fauber said in a statement. “BitSight is the leader in the cybersecurity ratings space, and together we will help market participants across disciplines better understand, measure, and manage their cyber risks and translate that to the risk of cyber loss.”

Meanwhile, BitSight’s purchase of VisibleRisk, a cyber risk ratings joint venture created by Moody’s and Team8, brings in-depth cyber risk assessment capabilities to BitSight’s platform, enabling the startup to better analyze and calculate an organization’s financial exposure to cyber risk. VisibleRisk, which has raised $25 million to date, says its so-called “cyber ratings” are based on cyber risk quantification, which allows companies to benchmark their cyber risk against those of their peers, and to better understand and manage the impact of cyber threats to their businesses.

Following the acquisition, BitSight will also create a risk solutions division focused on delivering a suite of critical solutions and analytics serving stakeholders including chief risk officers, C-suite executives, and boards of directors. This division will be led by VisibleRisk co-founder and CEO Derek Vadala, who previously headed up Moody’s cyber risk group.

Steve Harvey, president and CEO of BitSight, said the company’s partnership with Moody’s and its acquisition of VisibleRisk will expand its reach to “help customers manage cyber risk in an increasingly digital world.”

BitSight was founded in 2011 and has raised a total of $155 million in outside funding, most recently closing a $60 million Series D round led by Warburg Pincus. The startup has just shy of 500 employees and more than 2,300 global customers, including government agencies, insurers and asset managers. 

#articles, #boston, #computer-security, #cyberattack, #cybercrime, #cyberwarfare, #leader, #risk, #risk-analysis, #risk-management, #safety, #security, #team8, #warburg-pincus

Rezilion raises $30M help security operations teams with tools to automate their busywork

Security operations teams face a daunting task these days, fending off malicious hackers and their increasingly sophisticated approaches to cracking into networks. That also represents a gap in the market: building tools to help those security teams do their jobs. Today, an Israeli startup called Rezilion that is doing just that — building automation tools for DevSecOps, the area of IT that addresses the needs of security teams and the technical work that they need to do in their jobs — is announcing $30 million in funding.

Guggenheim Investments is leading the round with JVP and Kindred Capital also contributing. Rezilion said that unnamed executives from Google, Microsoft, CrowdStrike, IBM, Cisco, PayPal, JP Morgan Chase, Nasdaq, eBay, Symantec, RedHat, RSA and Tenable are also in the round. Previously, the company had raised $8 million.

Rezilion’s funding is coming on the back of strong initial growth for the startup in its first two years of operations.

Its customer base is made up of some of the world’s biggest companies, including two of the “Fortune 10” (the top 10 of the Fortune 500). CEO Liran Tancman, who co-founded Rezilion with CTO Shlomi Boutnaru, said that one of those two is one of the world’s biggest software companies, and the other is a major connected device vendor, but he declined to say which. (For the record, the top 10 includes Amazon, Apple, Alphabet/Google, Walmart and CVS.)

Tancman and Boutnaru had previously co-founded another security startup, CyActive, which was acquired by PayPal in 2015; the pair worked there together until leaving to start Rezilion.

There are a lot of tools out in the market now to help automate different aspects of developer and security operations. Rezilion focuses on a specific part of DevSecOps: large businesses have over the years put in place a lot of processes that they need to follow to try to triage and make the most thorough efforts possible to detect security threats. Today, that might involve inspecting every single suspicious piece of activity to determine what the implications might be.

The problem is that with the volume of information coming in, taking the time to inspect and understand each piece of suspicious activity can put enormous strain on an organization: it’s time-consuming, and as it turns out, not the best use of that time because of the signal to noise ratio involved. Typically, each vulnerability can take 6-9 hours to properly investigate, Tancman said. “But usually about 70-80% of them are not exploitable,” meaning they may be bad for some, but not for this particular organization and the code it’s using today. That represents a very inefficient use of the security team’s time and energy.

“Eight of out ten patches tend to be a waste of time,” Tancman said of the approach that is typically made today. He believes that as its AI continues to grow and its knowledge and solution becomes more sophisticated, “it might soon be 9 out of 10.”

Rezilion has built a taxonomy and an AI-based system that essentially does that inspection work as a human would do: it spots any new, or suspicious, code, figures out what it is trying to do, and runs it against a company’s existing code and systems to see how and if it might actually be a threat to it or create further problems down the line. If it’s all good, it essentially whitelists the code. If not, it flags it to the team.

The stickiness of the product has come out of how Tancman and Boutnaru understand large enterprises, especially those heavy with technology stacks, operate these days in what has become a very challenging environment for cybersecurity teams.

“They are using us to accelerate their delivery processes while staying safe,” Tancman said. “They have strict compliance departments and have to adhere to certain standards,” in terms of the protocols they take around security work, he added. “They want to leverage DevOps to release that.”

He said Rezilion has generally won over customers in large part for simply understanding that culture and process and helping them work better within that: “Companies become users of our product because we showed them that, at a fraction of the effort, they can be more secure.” This has special resonance in the world of tech, although financial services, and other verticals that essentially leverage technology as a significant foundation for how they operate, are also among the startup’s user base.

Down the line, Rezilion plans to add remediation and mitigation into the mix to further extend what it can do with its automation tools, which is part of where the funding will be going, too, Boutnaru said. But he doesn’t believe it will ever replace the human in the equation altogether.

“It will just focus them on the places where you need more human thinking,” he said. “We’re just removing the need for tedious work.”

In that grand tradition of enterprise automation, then, it will be interesting to watch which other automation-centric platforms might make a move into security alongside the other automation they are building. For now, Rezilion is forging out an interesting enough area for itself to get investors interested.

“Rezilion’s product suite is a game changer for security teams,” said Rusty Parks, senior MD of Guggenheim Investments, in a statement. “It creates a win-win, allowing companies to speed innovative products and features to market while enhancing their security posture. We believe Rezilion has created a truly compelling value proposition for security teams, one that greatly increases return on time while thoroughly protecting one’s core infrastructure.”

#agile-software-development, #alphabet, #amazon, #apple, #articles, #artificial-intelligence, #automation, #ceo, #cisco, #computer-security, #crowdstrike, #cto, #cyactive, #devops, #ebay, #energy, #entrepreneurship, #europe, #financial-services, #funding, #google, #ibm, #jp-morgan-chase, #kindred-capital, #maryland, #microsoft, #paypal, #security, #software, #software-development, #startup-company, #symantec, #technology

What China’s new data privacy law means for US tech firms

China enacted a sweeping new data privacy law on August 20 that will dramatically impact how tech companies can operate in the country. Officially called the Personal Information Protection Law of the People’s Republic of China (PIPL), the law is the first national data privacy statute passed in China.

Modeled after the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation, the PIPL imposes protections and restrictions on data collection and transfer that companies both inside and outside of China will need to address. It is particularly focused on apps using personal information to target consumers or offer them different prices on products and services, and preventing the transfer of personal information to other countries with fewer protections for security.

The PIPL, slated to take effect on November 1, 2021, does not give companies a lot of time to prepare. Those that already follow GDPR practices, particularly if they’ve implemented it globally, will have an easier time complying with China’s new requirements. But firms that have not implemented GDPR practices will need to consider adopting a similar approach. In addition, U.S. companies will need to consider the new restrictions on the transfer of personal information from China to the U.S.

Implementation and compliance with the PIPL is a much more significant task for companies that have not implemented GDPR principles.

Here’s a deep dive into the PIPL and what it means for tech firms:

New data handling requirements

The PIPL introduces perhaps the most stringent set of requirements and protections for data privacy in the world (this includes special requirements relating to processing personal information by governmental agencies that will not be addressed here). The law broadly relates to all kinds of information, recorded by electronic or other means, related to identified or identifiable natural persons, but excludes anonymized information.

The following are some of the key new requirements for handling people’s personal information in China that will affect tech businesses:

Extra-territorial application of the China law

Historically, China regulations have only been applied to activities inside the country. The PIPL is similar in applying the law to personal information handling activities within Chinese borders. However, similar to GDPR, it also expands its application to the handling of personal information outside China if the following conditions are met:

  • Where the purpose is to provide products or services to people inside China.
  • Where analyzing or assessing activities of people inside China.
  • Other circumstances provided in laws or administrative regulations.

For example, if you are a U.S.-based company selling products to consumers in China, you may be subject to the China data privacy law even if you do not have a facility or operations there.

Data handling principles

The PIPL introduces principles of transparency, purpose and data minimization: Companies can only collect personal information for a clear, reasonable and disclosed purpose, and to the smallest scope for realizing the purpose, and retain the data only for the period necessary to fulfill that purpose. Any information handler is also required to ensure the accuracy and completeness of the data it handles to avoid any negative impact on personal rights and interests.

#asia, #china, #column, #computer-security, #data-protection, #data-security, #ec-china, #ec-column, #ec-east-asia, #encryption, #european-union, #general-data-protection-regulation, #government, #internet, #iphone, #privacy, #tc

Titanfall 2 video game allegedly hacked via “simple exploit”

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Enlarge / Knifin’ around. Cutcutcutcutcutcutcutcut.

Popular first-person shooter video game Titanfall 2 has been rumored to have a severe security vulnerability that has been exploited.

The reports of the game having been hacked started circulating on Twitter after Titanfall 2 community members, including Leon Benkovic, were seen urging players to uninstall the game:

Gamers allege that the vulnerability lets attackers gain local code execution abilities from Respawn’s servers, affecting Titanfall 2 players on all platforms—Windows, PlayStation, and Xbox.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments

#computer-security, #electronic-arts, #exploit, #gaming-culture, #hacked, #respawn-entertainment, #tech, #titanfall-2, #video-game, #vulnerability

Meet the Freedom Phone, a Smartphone for Conservatives

A 22-year-old Bitcoin millionaire wants Republicans to ditch their iPhones for a low-end handset that he hopes to turn into a political tool.

#apple-inc, #bitcoin-currency, #censorship, #computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #conservatism-us-politics, #finman-erik, #freedom-of-speech-and-expression, #gab-ai-inc, #google-inc, #parler-llc, #politics-and-government

SEC fines brokerage firms over email hacks that exposed client data

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has fined several brokerage firms a total of $750,000 for exposing the sensitive personally identifiable information of thousands of customers and clients after hackers took over employee email accounts.

A total of eight entities belonging to three companies have been sanctioned by the SEC, including Cetera (Advisor Networks, Investment Services, Financial Specialists, Advisors, and Investment Advisers), Cambridge Investment Research (Investment Research and Investment Research Advisors), and KMS Financial Services.

In a press release, the SEC announced that it had sanctioned the firms for failures in their cybersecurity policies and procedures that allowed hackers to gain unauthorized access to cloud-based email accounts, exposing the personal information of thousands of customers and clients at each firm

In the case of Cetera, the SEC said that cloud-based email accounts of more than 60 employees were infiltrated by unauthorized third parties for more than three years, exposing at least 4,388 clients’ personal information.

The order states that none of the accounts featured the protections required by Cetera’s policies, and the SEC also charged two of the Cetera entities with sending breach notifications to clients containing “misleading language suggesting that the notifications were issued much sooner than they actually were after discovery of the incidents.”

The SEC’s order against Cambridge concludes that the personal information exposure of at least 2,177 Cambridge customers and clients was the result of lax cybersecurity practices at the firm. 

“Although Cambridge discovered the first email account takeover in January 2018, it failed to adopt and implement firm-wide enhanced security measures for cloud-based email accounts of its representatives until 2021, resulting in the exposure and potential exposure of additional customer and client records and information,” the SEC said. 

The order against KMS is similar; the SEC’s order states that the data of almost 5,000 customers and clients were exposed as a result of the company’s failure to adopt written policies and procedures requiring additional firm-wide security measures until May 2020. 

“Investment advisers and broker-dealers must fulfill their obligations concerning the protection of customer information,” said Kristina Littman, chief of the SEC Enforcement Division’s Cyber Unit. “It is not enough to write a policy requiring enhanced security measures if those requirements are not implemented or are only partially implemented, especially in the face of known attacks.”

All of the parties agreed to resolve the charges and to not commit future violations of the charged provisions, without admitting or denying the SEC’s findings. As part of the settlements, Cetera will pay a penalty of $300,000, while Cambridge and KMS will pay fines of $250,000 and $200,000 respectively.  

Cambridge told TechCrunch that it does not comment on regulatory matters, but said it has and does maintain a comprehensive information security group and procedures to ensure clients’ accounts are fully protected. Cetera and KMS have yet to respond.

This latest action by the SEC comes just weeks after the Commission ordered London-based publishing and education giant Pearson to pay a $1 million fine for misleading investors about a 2018 data breach at the company.

#chief, #computer-security, #data-breach, #data-security, #security

How G.O.P. Election Reviews Created a New Security Threat

As Republicans continue to challenge the 2020 results, voting equipment is being compromised when partisan insiders and unvetted operatives gain access.

#computer-security, #computers-and-the-internet, #conspiracy-theories, #dominion-voting-systems-corp, #infrastructure-public-works, #presidential-election-of-2020, #republican-party, #rumors-and-misinformation, #state-legislatures, #trump-donald-j, #united-states-politics-and-government, #voting-and-voters, #voting-machines

A popular smart home security system can be remotely disarmed, researchers say

A cybersecurity company says a popular smart home security system has a pair of vulnerabilities that can be exploited to disarm the system altogether.

Rapid7 found the vulnerabilities in the Fortress S03, a home security system that relies on Wi-Fi to connect cameras, motion sensors, and sirens to the internet, allowing owners to remotely monitor their home anywhere with a mobile app. The security system also uses a radio-controlled key fob to let homeowners arm or disarm their house from outside their front door.

But the cybersecurity company said the vulnerabilities include an unauthenticated API and an unencrypted radio signal that can be easily intercepted.

Rapid7 revealed details of the two vulnerabilities on Tuesday after not hearing from Fortress in three months, the standard window of time that security researchers give to companies to fix bugs before details are made public. Rapid7 said its only acknowledgment of its email was when Fortress closed its support ticket a week later without commenting.

Fortress owner Michael Hofeditz opened but did not respond to several emails sent by TechCrunch with an email open tracker. An email from Bottone Riling, a Massachusetts law firm representing Fortress, called the claims “false, purposely misleading and defamatory,” but did not provide specifics that it claims are false, or if Fortress has mitigated the vulnerabilities.

Rapid7 said that Fortress’ unauthenticated API can be remotely queried over the internet without the server checking if the request is legitimate. The researchers said by knowing a homeowner’s email address, the server would return the device’s unique IMEI, which in turn could be used to remotely disarm the system.

The other flaw takes advantage of the unencrypted radio signals sent between the security system and the homeowner’s key fob. That allowed Rapid7 to capture and replay the signals for “arm” and “disarm” because the radio waves weren’t scrambled properly.

Vishwakarma said homeowners could add a plus-tagged email address with a long, unique string of letters and numbers in place of a password as a stand-in for a password. But there was little for homeowners to do for the radio signal bug until Fortress addresses it.

Fortress has not said if it has fixed or plans to fix the vulnerabilities. It’s not clear if Fortress is able to fix the vulnerabilities without replacing the hardware. It’s not known if Fortress builds the device itself or buys the hardware from another manufacturer.

Read more:

#api, #computer-security, #cryptography, #cyberwarfare, #hacking, #law, #massachusetts, #password, #rapid7, #security, #software-testing, #vulnerability

Big Tech pledges billions to bolster U.S. cybersecurity defenses

Tech giants Apple, Google and Microsoft have pledged billions to bolster U.S. cybersecurity following a meeting with President Joe Biden at the White House on Wednesday.

The meeting, which also included attendees from the financial and education sectors, was held following months of high-profile cyberattacks against critical infrastructure and several U.S. government agencies, along with a glaring cybersecurity skills gap; according to data from CyberSeek, there are currently almost 500,000 cybersecurity jobs across the U.S that remain unfilled.

“Most of our critical infrastructure is owned and operated by the private sector, and the federal government can’t meet this challenge alone,” Biden said at the start of the meeting. “I’ve invited you all here today because you have the power, the capacity and the responsibility, I believe, to raise the bar on cybersecurity.”

In order to help the U.S. in its fight against a growing number of cyberattacks, Big Tech pledged to invest billions of dollars to strengthen cybersecurity defenses and to train skilled cybersecurity workers.

Apple has vowed to work with its 9,000-plus suppliers in the U.S. to drive “mass adoption” of multi-factor authentication and security training, according to the White House, as well as to establish a new program to drive continuous security improvements throughout the technology supply chain.

Google said it will invest more than $10 billion over the next five years to expand zero-trust programs, help secure the software supply chain, and to enhance open source security. The search and ads giant has also pledged to train 100,000 Americans in fields like IT support and data analytics, learning in-demand skills including data privacy and security.

“Robust cybersecurity ultimately depends on having the people to implement it,” said Kent Walker, Google’s global affairs chief. “That includes people with digital skills capable of designing and executing cybersecurity solutions, as well as promoting awareness of cybersecurity risks and protocols among the broader population.”

And, Microsoft said it’s committing $20 billion to integrate cybersecurity by design and deliver “advanced security solutions.” It also announced that it will immediately make available $150 million in technical services to help federal, state, and local governments with upgrading security protection, and will expand partnerships with community colleges and non-profits for cybersecurity training.

Other attendees included Amazon Web Services (AWS), Amazon’s cloud computing arm, and IBM. The former has said it will make its security awareness training available to the public and equip all AWS customers with hardware multi-factor authentication devices, while IBM said it will help to train more than 150,000 people in cybersecurity skills over the next five years.

While many have welcomed Big Tech’s commitments, David Carroll, managing director at Nominet Cyber, told TechCrunch that these latest initiatives set a “powerful precedent” and show “the gloves are well and truly off” — some within the cybersecurity industry remain skeptical.

Following the announcement, some infosec veterans noted that many of the vacant cybersecurity jobs the U.S. is looking to fill fall behind on competitive salaries and few, if any, benefits.

“So 500,000 open cybersecurity jobs and almost that same amount or more looking for jobs,” said Khalilah Scott, founder of TechSecChix, a foundation for supporting women in technology, in a tweet. “Make it make sense.”

#amazon, #apple, #computer-security, #cyberattack, #google, #government, #malware, #microsoft, #president, #security, #u-s-government, #united-states