How the U.S. Let 20 Million Monkeypox Vaccine Doses Expire

At the start of the monkeypox outbreak the U.S. stockpile contained just 2,400 doses of vaccine, a far cry from the more than 20 million it once held.

#bavarian-nordic-as, #biological-and-chemical-warfare, #centers-for-disease-control-and-prevention, #denmark, #food-and-drug-administration, #health-and-human-services-department, #monkeypox, #new-york-city, #smallpox, #terrorism, #united-states, #vaccination-and-immunization

Trump Policies Sent U.S. Tumbling in a Climate Ranking

The Environmental Performance Index, published every two years by researchers at Yale and Columbia, found only Denmark and Britain on sustainable paths to net-zero emissions by 2050.

#denmark, #global-warming, #great-britain, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #research, #yale-university

A Darker ‘Borgen’ Returns, and Heads to Greenland

The acclaimed Danish series is back for a fourth season, which focuses on a geopolitical crisis brewing in Greenland.

#actors-and-actresses, #borgen-tv-program, #denmark, #greenland, #knudsen-sidse-babett, #price-adam-1967, #sorensen-birgitte-hjort, #television

7 Great Biking Cities (and Which Trails to Ride)

There’s no better way to zip through a new city than on two wheels. Here are some routes to try, from riverside jaunts to mountain climbs.

#bicycles-and-bicycling, #bogota-colombia, #budget-travel, #colombia, #copenhagen-denmark, #cycling-road, #denmark, #geneva-ny, #georgetown-washington-dc, #golden-gate-park-san-francisco, #manhattan-nyc, #manhattan-waterfront-greenway, #paris-france, #san-francisco-calif, #summer-season, #switzerland, #travel-and-vacations, #washington-dc

Cultivating Coveted Morel Mushrooms Year-Round and Indoors

Jacob and Karsten Kirk, twins from Copenhagen, say they have devised a method to reliably grow morel mushrooms in a climate-controlled environment.

#agriculture-and-farming, #biology-and-biochemistry, #copenhagen-denmark, #danish-morel-project, #denmark, #inventions-and-patents, #kirk-jacob, #kirk-karsten, #monaghan-thomas-s, #morels, #mushrooms

The Transfixing Beauty of Starling Murmurations

Each spring and autumn, the skies in southern Denmark come to life with the swirling displays of hundreds of thousands of starlings, an event known locally as “sort sol.”

#animal-behavior, #birds, #catalonia-spain, #denmark, #england, #friesland-netherlands, #germany, #ireland, #netherlands, #photography, #travel-and-vacations, #united-nations-educational-scientific-and-cultural-organization

Cuts in Britain Could Cause a Covid Data Drought

Countries that once led the world in coronavirus monitoring are now scaling back, leaving the world less prepared to spot future variants, experts said.

#coronavirus-2019-ncov, #coronavirus-omicron-variant, #denmark, #disease-rates, #great-britain, #politics-and-government, #your-feed-science

‘Free Ukraine Street’: Russian Embassies Get Pointed New Addresses

Officials in many European cities are giving streets, squares and intersections in front of Russian missions names with pro-Ukraine themes.

#albania, #denmark, #diplomatic-service-embassies-and-consulates, #lithuania, #norway, #putin-vladimir-v, #russia, #russian-invasion-of-ukraine-2022, #ukraine, #war-and-armed-conflicts

These Syrian Refugees Can’t Stay in Denmark, but They Can’t Go Home

Dozens of Syrian asylum seekers are stuck in limbo after the Danish authorities decided it was safe for them to go back home and stripped their residency permits.

#asylum-right-of, #damascus-syria, #denmark, #deportation, #immigration-and-emigration, #immigration-detention, #refugees-and-displaced-persons, #syria

NATO Countries Pour Weapons Into Ukraine, Risking Conflict With Russia

Brussels is proud to be providing military aid, but Moscow may see it as a dangerous intervention and could move to disrupt the flow of arms through Poland.

#baltic-region, #belarus, #belgium, #borrell-fontelles-josep, #bulgaria, #czech-republic, #defense-and-military-forces, #denmark, #estonia, #europe, #european-union, #finland, #france, #germany, #great-britain, #greece, #hungary, #italy, #latvia, #lithuania, #morawiecki-mateusz, #north-atlantic-treaty-organization, #politics-and-government, #putin-vladimir-v, #russia, #russian-invasion-of-ukraine-2022, #stoltenberg-jens, #ukraine, #von-der-leyen-ursula, #war-and-armed-conflicts

Omicron subvariant BA.2 continues global rise as experts assess mixed data

Omicron subvariant BA.2 continues global rise as experts assess mixed data

Enlarge (credit: Getty | Xinhua News Agency)

A sub-lineage of the omicron coronavirus variant, dubbed BA.2, continues to increase steadily around the globe as scientists and health officials are still working to understand the risk it poses to public health.

So far, the overall data has been a mix. Some recent laboratory and animal data have suggested that BA.2 can cause more severe disease than the original omicron variant, BA.1. But, so far, that finding isn’t bearing out in real-world data. Countries where BA.2 is dominant are not seeing higher rates of severe disease. And, many places seeing BA.2 increasing are also seeing cases decline, along with hospitalizations.

While animal experiments have hinted that BA.2 interacts differently to some immune responses than the original omicron variant, so far real-world vaccine data finds two doses and booster doses are just as effective—if not slightly more effective—against BA.2 than BA.1.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

#ba-1, #ba-2, #covid-19, #denmark, #disease-severity, #infectious-disease, #japan, #nepal, #omicron, #public-health, #science, #south-africa, #transmission, #uk, #us, #variant

Inside Denmark’s ‘Live With Covid’ Approach

The Nordic country is trying a bold, some say risky, approach: with high vaccination rates and trust in the authorities, it has lifted all restrictions.

#coronavirus-omicron-variant, #coronavirus-reopenings, #denmark, #masks, #vaccination-and-immunization

What Would Covid Being Endemic Mean For Travel?

A growing call to consider the coronavirus a permanent fixture in our lives is resonating among travel operators. But that would not necessarily mean the virus is no longer dangerous.

#advertising-and-marketing, #airlines-for-america, #booking-com, #coronavirus-omicron-variant, #coronavirus-reopenings, #denmark, #expedia-inc, #fauci-anthony-s, #frederiksen-mette, #great-britain, #international-air-transport-assn, #johnson-boris, #masks, #quarantine-life-and-culture, #travel-and-vacations, #travel-warnings, #united-states-travel-assn, #world-health-organization

The End of the Pandemic May Tear Us Apart

Denmark is moving on from the pandemic. Not all countries can easily follow. 

#coronavirus-2019-ncov, #denmark, #politics-and-government

Animals Infecting Humans Is Scary. It’s Worse When We Infect Them Back.

Mink farms threaten to become a source of new coronavirus variants — and an object lesson in how ‘spillback’ can make deadly diseases even deadlier.

#agriculture-and-farming, #animals, #coronavirus-delta-variant, #coronavirus-omicron-variant, #coronavirus-risks-and-safety-concerns, #denmark, #disease-rates, #epidemics, #minks-animals, #utah

Spurred by Omicron, Europe Sets Covid Infection Records Every Day

The surge of cases is causing chaos as people scramble to obtain tests, businesses grapple with staff shortages and New Year’s festivities are thrown into question.

#bergamo-italy, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #coronavirus-delta-variant, #coronavirus-omicron-variant, #denmark, #england, #europe, #france, #tedros-adhanom-ghebreyesus, #tests-medical, #world-health-organization

Spurred by Omicron, Europe Is Setting Coronavirus Infection Records Every Day

The surge of cases is causing chaos as people scramble to obtain tests, businesses grapple with staff shortages and New Year’s festivities are thrown into question.

#bergamo-italy, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #coronavirus-delta-variant, #coronavirus-omicron-variant, #denmark, #england, #europe, #france, #tedros-adhanom-ghebreyesus, #tests-medical, #world-health-organization

Denmark and Norway Predict Drastic Spike in Omicron Cases

Health authorities in Europe are warning of a sharp increase in Omicron cases, adding to an existing surge from the Delta variant.

#coronavirus-2019-ncov, #coronavirus-delta-variant, #coronavirus-omicron-variant, #denmark, #great-britain, #norway, #research, #vaccination-and-immunization

Former Immigration Minister in Denmark Sentenced to Prison for Separating Couples

Inger Stojberg was sentenced to two months’ incarceration after being found by a court to have illegally ordered the separations of married migrant couples in which at least one person was underage.

#denmark, #immigration-and-emigration, #impeachment, #legislatures-and-parliaments, #middle-east-and-africa-migrant-crisis, #stojberg-inger

U.S. and Others Pledge Export Controls Tied to Human Rights

The Biden administration’s partnership with Australia, Denmark, Norway, Canada, France, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom aims to stem the flow of key technologies to authoritarian governments.

#australia, #biden-joseph-r-jr, #china, #denmark, #human-rights-and-human-rights-violations, #international-relations, #international-trade-and-world-market, #norway, #russia, #surveillance-of-citizens-by-government, #united-states-politics-and-government

Denmark’s Prime Minister is Questioned Over Mass Mink Slaughter

The prime minister, Mette Frederiksen, said she did not know the government lacked legal authority to order the mass slaughter of 17 million minks after infected animals passed the virus to humans.

#agriculture-and-farming, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #denmark, #frederiksen-mette, #minks-animals, #politics-and-government

Spike in Omicron Variant Cases Puts Europe on Edge

With cases of the Omicron variant rising in Europe, there are worries that even tougher restrictions are looming over a holiday period that many had hoped would be a return to some normalcy.

#coronavirus-2019-ncov, #coronavirus-omicron-variant, #denmark, #europe, #great-britain, #quarantines, #travel-warnings

In ‘Flee,’ Jonas Poher Rasmussen Animates His Friend’s Story

Jonas Poher Rasmussen’s childhood friend kept his flight from Afghanistan secret for 20 years. Now, Rasmussen has told his story through the award-winning film “Flee.”

#afghanistan, #animated-films, #content-type-personal-profile, #denmark, #documentary-films-and-programs, #flee-movie, #immigration-and-emigration, #rasmussen-jonas-poher, #refugees-and-displaced-persons

Denmark’s Hard Lessons About Trust and the Pandemic

Social and institutional trust are critical when the future is uncertain.

#coronavirus-2019-ncov, #coronavirus-reopenings, #denmark, #politics-and-government, #vaccination-and-immunization

How Other Nations Pay for Child Care. The U.S. Is an Outlier.

Rich countries contribute an average of $14,000 per year for a toddler’s care, compared with $500 in the U.S. The Democrats’ spending bill tries to shrink the gap.

#child-care, #children-and-childhood, #denmark, #education-k-12, #education-pre-school, #families-and-family-life, #united-states-economy

Why Are Democratic Centrists Spouting Right-Wing Propaganda?

A lot of what they think they know just isn’t so.

#biden-joseph-r-jr, #democratic-party, #denmark, #income-inequality, #infrastructure-public-works, #labor-and-jobs, #national-debt-us, #reagan-ronald-wilson, #republican-party, #united-states, #united-states-economy, #united-states-politics-and-government

Inger Stojberg, Danish Official, Faces Impeachment Trial Over Migration Policy

Inger Stojberg, who presided over tough anti-immigrant policies when her party was in charge, is being tried on charges of illegally separating couples who sought asylum.

#denmark, #europe, #immigration-and-emigration, #politics-and-government, #stojberg-inger

‘No code’ process automation platform, Leapwork, fires up with $62M Series B

Copenhagen-based process automation platform Leapwork has snagged Denmark’s largest ever Series B funding round, announcing a $62 million raise co-led by KKR and Salesforce Ventures, with existing investors DN Capital and Headline also participating.

Also today it’s disclosing that its post-money valuation now stands at $312M. 

The ‘no code’ 2015-founded startup last raised back in 2019, when it snagged a $10M Series A. The business was bootstrapped through earlier years — with the founders putting in their own money, garnered from prior successful exits. Their follow on bet on ‘no code’ already looks to have paid off in spades: Since launching the platform in 2017, Leapwork has seen its customer base more than double year on year and it now has a roster of 300+ customers around the world paying it to speed up their routine business processes.

Software testing is a particular focus for the tools, which Leapwork pitches at enterprises’ quality assurance and test teams.

It claims that by using its ‘no code’ tech — a label for the trend which refers to software that’s designed to be accessible to non-technical staff, greatly increasing its utility and applicability — businesses can achieve a 10x faster time to market, 97% productivity gains, and a 90% reduction in application errors. So the wider pitch is that it can support enterprises to achieve faster digital transformations with only their existing mix of in-house skills. 

Customers include the likes of PayPal, Mercedes-Benz and BNP Paribas.

Leapwork’s own business, meanwhile, has grown to a team of 170 people — working across nine offices throughout Europe, North America and Asia.

The Series B funding will be used to accelerate its global expansion, with the startup telling us it plans to expand the size of its local teams in key markets and open a series of tech hubs to support further product development.

Expanding in North America is a big priority now, with Leapwork noting it recently opened a New York office — where it plans to “significantly” increase headcount.

“In terms of our global presence, we want to ensure we are as close to our customers as possible, by continuing to build up local teams and expertise across each of our key markets, especially Europe and North America,” CEO and co-founder Christian Brink Frederiksen tells TechCrunch. “For example, we will build up more expertise and plan to really scale up the size of the team based out of our New York office over the next 12 months.

“Equally we have opened new offices across Europe, so we want to ensure our teams have the scope to work closely with customers. We also plan to invest heavily in the product and the technology that underpins it. For example, we’ll be doubling the size of our tech hubs in Copenhagen and India over the next 12 months.”

Product development set to be accelerated with the chunky Series B will focus on enhancements and functionality aimed at “breaking down the language barrier between humans and computers”, as Brink Frederiksen puts it

“Europe and the US are our two main markets. Half of our customers are US companies,” he also tells us, adding: “We are extremely popular among enterprise customers, especially those with complex compliance set-ups — 40% of our customers come from enterprises banking, insurance and financial services.

“Having said that, because our solution is no-code, it is heavily used across industries, including healthcare and life sciences, logistics and transportation, retail, manufacturing and more.”

Asked about competitors — given that the no code space has become a seething hotbed of activity over a number of years — Leapwork’s initial response is coy, trying the line that its business is a ‘truly special snowflake’. (“We truly believe we are the only solution that allows non-technical everyday business users to automate repetitive computer processes, without needing to understand how to code. Our no-code, visual language is what really sets us apart,” is how Brink Frederiksen actually phrases that.)

But on being pressed Leapwork names a raft of what it calls “legacy players” — such as Tricentis, Smartbear, Ranorex, MicroFocus, Eggplant Software, Mabl and Selenium — as (also) having “great products”, while continuing to claim they “speak to a different audience than we do”.

Certainly Leapwork’s Series B raise speaks loudly of how much value investors are seeing here.

Commenting in a statement, Patrick Devine, director at KKR, said: “Test automation has historically been very challenging at scale, and it has become a growing pain point as the pace of software development continues to accelerate. Leapwork’s primary mission since its founding has been to solve this problem, and it has impressively done so with its powerful no-code automation platform.”

“The team at Leapwork has done a fantastic job building a best-in-class corporate culture which has allowed them to continuously innovate, execute and push the boundaries of their automation platform,” added Stephen Shanley, managing director at KKR, in another statement.

In a third supporting statement, Nowi Kallen, principal at Salesforce Ventures, added: “Leapwork has tapped into a significant market opportunity with its no-code test automation software. With Christian and Claus [Rosenkrantz Topholt] at the helm and increased acceleration to digital adoption, we look forward to seeing Leapwork grow in the coming years and a successful partnership.”

The proof of the no code ‘pudding’ is in adoption and usage — getting non-developers to take to and stick with a new way of interfacing with and manipulating information. And so far, for Leapwork, the signs are looking good.

#bnp-paribas, #copenhagen, #denmark, #dn-capital, #enterprise, #europe, #fundings-exits, #leapwork, #no-code, #north-america, #process-automation, #salesforce-ventures, #software-testing, #startup-company, #tricentis

Denmark Now Has Two Little Mermaids. The Famous One Is Suing.

The heirs of the artist behind the Copenhagen landmark want a similar statue torn down. And they want compensation, too.

#asaa-denmark, #copenhagen-denmark, #copyrights-and-copyright-violations, #denmark, #eriksen-edvard, #moerk-palle, #sculpture, #wills-and-estates

Facing Outrage Over Bikini Rule, Handball League Signals ‘Likely’ Change

In the weeks since Norway’s women’s beach handball team was fined for wearing shorts instead of bikini bottoms, other countries have increased pressure for a change in federation rules.

#american-samoa, #athletics-and-sports, #denmark, #discrimination, #fines-penalties, #handball, #hassan-moustafa, #international-handball-federation, #norway, #sexual-harassment, #team-handball, #uniforms, #women-and-girls

Customer engagement platform Dixa raises $105M Series C led by General Atlantic

European customer engagement platform Dixa has raised a Series C funding round of $105 million, led by growth equity investor General Atlantic. Existing investors Notion Capital, Project A, and Seed Capital also participated. In February last year, it raised $36 million in Series B funding, led by Notion Capital, with support from existing investors Project A and Seed.

As well a product development, Dixa plans to use the cash injection as a war chest to roll-up other products. It already acquired Melbourne-based Elevio in January 2021.

Founded in Denmark in 2015 and launched in 2018, Dixa says it enables brands to stay connected with customers via messaging, live chat, email, or voice.

Mads Fosselius, founder and CEO of Dixa said: “For today’s customers, channels have ceased to matter. The way they engage now is holistically blended into what is called ‘multiexperience’. This is how we’re empowering brands to continuously stay true to their values.

Tom Hussey, Vice President in General Atlantic’s Technology sector focused on B2B software added: “Customer service software is undergoing a fundamental transformation, moving away from disjointed, transactional approaches towards longitudinal, conversational engagement. Dixa has helped to define and lead this multiexperience approach.”

#ceo, #denmark, #dixa, #elevio, #europe, #general-atlantic, #melbourne, #notion-capital, #olo, #seed-capital, #tc, #vice-president

Headache Research Advances Though Cures Are Elusive

Research into these often mysterious and debilitating disorders has languished. That’s changing.

#amgen-inc, #brain, #clinical-trials, #denmark, #drugs-pharmaceuticals, #eli-lilly-and-company, #food-and-drug-administration, #headaches, #health-insurance-and-managed-care, #migraine-headaches, #national-institutes-of-health, #nerves-and-nervous-system, #pain, #research, #science-and-technology, #united-states

Kurt Westergaard, 86, Dies; His Muhammad Cartoon Sparked Outrage

A caricature that many Muslims considered blasphemous prompted a debate over free speech and a massacre at the offices of a Paris magazine.

#cartoons-and-cartoonists, #deaths-obituaries, #denmark, #freedom-of-the-press, #jyllands-posten, #mohammed-the-prophet-of-islam, #muslims-and-islam, #newspapers, #westergaard-kurt

Denmark’s Christian Eriksen Is Stable and Talking to Friends

Denmark’s soccer federation said the midfielder who collapsed during a Euro 2020 match on Saturday had sent greetings to his teammates.

#denmark, #eriksen-christian-1992, #soccer, #uefa-european-football-championship

Apple announces its 2021 Apple Design Award winners

Apple incorporated the announcement of this year’s Apple Design Award winners into its virtual Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC) online event, instead of waiting until the event had wrapped, like last year. Ahead of WWDC, Apple previewed the finalists, whose apps and games showcased a combination of technical achievement, design and ingenuity. This evening, Apple announced the winners across six new award categories.

In each category, Apple selected one app and one game as the winner.

In the Inclusivity category, winners supported people from a diversity of backgrounds, abilities and languages.

This year, winners included U.S.-based Aconite’s highly accessible game, HoloVista, where users can adjust various options for motion control, text sizes, text contrast, sound, and visual effect intensity. In the game, users explore using the iPhone’s camera to find hidden objects, solve puzzles and more. (Our coverage)

Image Credits: Aconite

Another winner, Voice Dream Reader, is a text-to-speech app that support more than two dozen languages and offers adaptive features and a high level of customizable settings.

Image Credits: Voice Dream LLC

In the Delight and Fun, category, winners offer memorable and engaging experiences enhanced by Apple technologies. Belgium’s Pok Pok Playroom, a kid entertainment app that spun out of Snowman (Alto’s Adventure series), won for its thoughtful design and use of subtle haptics, sound effects and interactions. (Our coverage)

Image Credits: Pok Pok

Another winner included U.K.s’ Little Orpheus, a platformer that combines storytelling, surprises, and fun and offers a console-like experience in a casual game.

Image Credits: The Chinese Room

The Interaction category winners showcase apps that offer intuitive interfaces and effortless controls, Apple says.

The U.S.-based snarky weather app CARROT Weather won for its humorous forecasts, unique visuals, and entertaining experience, which is also available as Apple Watch faces and widgets.

Image Credits: Brian Mueller, Grailr LLC

Canada’s Bird Alone game combines gestures, haptics, parallax, and dynamic sound effects in clever ways to brings its world to life.

Image Credits: George Batchelor

A Social Impact category doled out awards to Denmark’s Be My Eyes, which enables people who are blind and low vision to identify objects by pairing them with volunteers from around the world using their camera. Today, it supports over 300K users who are assisted by over 4.5M volunteers. (Our coverage)

Image Credits: S/I Be My Eyes

U.K.’s ustwo games won in this category for Alba, a game that teaches about respecting the environment as players save wildlife, repair a bridge, clean up trash and more. The game also plants a tree for every download.

Image Credits: ustwo games

The Visuals and Graphics winners feature “stunning imagery, skillfully drawn interfaces, and high-quality animations,” Apple says.

Belarus-based Loóna offers sleepscape sessions which combine relaxing activities and atmospheric sounds with storytelling to help people wind down at night. The app was recently awarded Google’s “best app” of 2020.

Image Credits: Loóna Inc

China’s Genshin Impact won for pushing the visual frontier on gaming, as motion blur, shadow quality, and frame rate can be reconfigured on the fly. The game had previously made Apple’s Best of 2020 list and was Google’s best game of 2020.

Image Credits: miHoYo Limited

Innovation winners included India’s NaadSadhana, an all-in-one, studio-quality music app that helps artists perform and publish. The app uses A.I. and Core ML to listen and provide feedback on the accuracy of notes, and generates a backing track to match.

Image Credits: Sandeep Ranade

Riot Games’ League of Legends: Wild Rift (U.S.) won for taking a complex PC classic and delivering a full mobile experience that includes touchscreen controls, an auto-targeting system for newcomers, and a mobile-exclusive camera setting.

Image Credits: Riot Games

The winners this year will receive a prize package that includes hardware and the award itself.

A video featuring the winners is here on the Apple Developer website.

“This year’s Apple Design Award winners have redefined what we’ve come to expect from a great app experience, and we congratulate them on a well-deserved win,” said Susan Prescott, Apple’s vice president of Worldwide Developer Relations, in a statement. “The work of these developers embodies the essential role apps and games play in our everyday lives, and serve as perfect examples of our six new award categories.”

read more about Apple's WWDC 2021 on TechCrunch

#a-i, #apple, #apple-inc, #apple-watch, #apps, #awards, #belarus, #belgium, #companies, #computing, #denmark, #games, #gaming, #india, #ios, #league-of-legends, #loona, #susan-prescott, #text-to-speech, #united-states, #wwdc, #wwdc-2021

Denmark Passes Law Allowing Asylum Seekers to Be Processed Outside Europe

The law is the latest in a series of hard-line measures that have been introduced in recent years to discourage migration.

#denmark, #europe, #frederiksen-mette, #middle-east-and-africa-migrant-crisis, #united-nations, #united-nations-high-commission-for-refugees

Pivoting from offline into virtual events for enterprises nets Tame a $5.5M Seed round

In March 2020, Tame had a digital event suite for offline corporate events. But with the pandemic hitting, it did a hard pivot into providing a highly customizable virtual events platform, primarily used by companies for their sales events. The result is that it has now raised a seed round of $5.5m, a large round for its native Denmark, led by VF Venture (The Danish Growth Fund), along with byFounders and and three leading angels: Mikkel Lomholt (CTO & Co-founder, Planday); Sune Alstrup (Ex-CEO & Co-founder, The Eye Tribe); and Ulrik Lehrskov Schmidt.

The investment will be used to scale from 20 to 60 new employees across Copenhagen, London, and Krakow; expand to the UK, and grow revenues.

Founder Jasenko Hadzic, CEO and Co-founder said the pivot to virtual grew revenues “by 700% organically last year. No sales. No marketing. Organically. Therefore, Tame sees a huge opportunity and is going all-in on expanding aggressively to position itself as a market leader.”

Jacob Bratting Pedersen, Partner, VF Venture, said: “At VF Venture, we want to help develop and drive innovation. The corona crisis has brought digital momentum with it, and here Danish IT entrepreneurs have the opportunity to seize that agenda and bring Danish technology and expertise to the global market. Tame is a really good example of that. Tame has great potential to create a strong, global business for the benefit of growth and jobs in Denmark.”

Hadzic himself is already a success story – he eventually made it into the tech industry after arriving in Denmark as a child refugee from war-torn Bosnia during the Yugoslavian civil war.

But don’t mistake Tame for a Hopin. Hadzic told me: “We’re not interested in getting TechCrunch Disrupt as a customer or, or the big trade fairs. We just want to focus on those enterprise companies which we sell to a marketing department or an HR department.”

#copenhagen, #countries, #denmark, #europe, #krakow, #london, #market-leader, #planday, #tame, #tc, #the-eye-tribe, #united-kingdom

When the Cellos Play, the Cows Come Home

A collaboration between a cattle farmer and a Danish music training program brings regular recitals to pampered livestock.

#cattle, #cellos, #classical-music, #denmark, #music, #scandinavian-cello-school, #shaw-jacob

Denmark Strips Some Syrians of Residency Status

The country is the first E.U. nation to make such a move. Many Syrians say that returning to their native country isn’t an option, and rights groups warn that the policy will tear some families apart.

#asylum-right-of, #denmark, #deportation, #immigration-and-emigration, #refugees-and-displaced-persons, #syria

Nordetect’s system to monitor soil and water for indoor agriculture raises seed funding

As indoor farming expands, a number of new companies are cropping up to provide better data and monitoring tools for the businesses aimed at improving efficiencies and quality of indoor crops. 

One of these companies, the Copenhagen-based Nordetect, is entering the U.S. market with around $1.5 million in funding from government investment firms and traditional accelerators like SOS V, with a tech that the company claims can give vertical farms a better way to monitor and manage nutrients and water quality.

Controlled agriculture, whether in greenhouses or warehouses, benefits from its ability to administer every aspect of the inputs to ensure that plants have the optimal growing conditions. It is, however, far more expensive than just seeding the ground.

Proponents say that these farms can overcome the additional expense by improving efficiency around water use, reducing the application of pesticides and fertilizer, and cultivating for better, tastier produce.

That’s where Keenan Pinto and Palak Sehgal’s Nordetect comes in. The two co-founders have known each other since they were undergraduates in India eight years ago. They went on to do their masters work together and after working in bioengineering plants — Sehgal focused on flowering systems in plants and Pinto focused on roots — they both went into more digital fields — but maintained their fascination with plants and kept in touch with each other.

Professional work in medical diagnostics for Sehgal and lab instrumentation for Pinto kept both busy, but they continued their discussions around plant science and soil health.

Roughly three years ago, the two hit on the idea for a combined toolkit for water quality monitoring and soil health. Sehgal left the India Institutes of Technology, where she had been working, and joined Pinto in Copenhagen to begin developing the tech that would form the core of Nordetect’s business proposition full time.

The company’s technology consists of an analyzer and a cartridge, a microfluidic chip that users can insert into their water tank to take a sample. From the data that the device collects, farmers can control the nutrients they put into the water to optimize for traits like color and flavor, Pinto said.

Image Credit: Shutterstock/Francesco83

The company was accepted into SOSV’s Hax accelerator in 2017 and the two first time founders moved from Denmark to Shenzhen to begin developing the business. In late 2018 the company moved back to Denmark and raised a small amount of additional capital from SOSV and Rockstart.

By 2020, watching the expansion of vertical farming, the company took what had initially been a soil monitoring tool and added water quality monitoring features to support indoor farming. That’s when the business started taking off, according to Pinto.

“One of the interesting things is when i consider the outdoor vs. the indoor markets. The outdoor felt a bit conservative… the indoor seems much more forthcoming… and that traction allowed us to pull together this funding round $1.5 million,” Pinto said. 

The new round came from Rockstart, Preseed Ventures, SOSV, the government of Denmark’s growth fund, and Luminate, a Rochester, NY-based accelerator that focuses on optical electronics technology.

Luminate’s participation is one reason why Nordetect is coming to the U.S., but it’s hardly the only reason. There’s also the capital that has come in to finance indoor ag companies. The two largest vertical farming companies in the U.S., Plenty and Bowery Farming have raised $541 million and $167 million between them.

“The vertical movement has put people into the position where they are what I call data farmers,” said Pinto. “Each batch of produce is being used to learn and the data is more important than the output. We used this market as a beachhead.”

#agriculture, #articles, #copenhagen, #denmark, #electronics, #india, #new-york, #shenzhen, #shutterstock, #soil, #sosv, #tc, #united-states, #urban-agriculture, #vertical-farming

Coronavirus Reinfections Are Rare, Danish Researchers Report

People over 65 are more likely to experience a second bout with the virus, according to a large study of medical records.

#coronavirus-2019-ncov, #denmark, #elderly, #immune-system, #lancet-the-journal, #research, #tests-medical, #vaccination-and-immunization, #your-feed-science

6 Copenhagen investors share their outlook on investing in 2021

While Denmark and Copenhagen don’t often come up as a destination for European startups, it has a thriving local tech scene that’s home to some of the better startup conferences. After all, who doesn’t want to visit Copenhagen?

A highly educated population, great universities, excellent healthcare and great transport links to Europe make the city as good a place as any to start up a company.

Amongst our investors, we found the trends they were most interested in included sustainable supply chain logistics, esports and gaming, enterprise SaaS, climate tech, deep tech hardware, agritech and edtech. And many said they are interested in the future of work and the transition to different ways of working.

Companies they are excited by included: Afresh Technologies, Seaborg Technologies (nuclear reactors), Labster (virtual science labs), Normative.io (social and environmental impact measurement) and DEMI (connecting with chefs).

In general, investors said they are focused on their home ground but are also spreading their wings to the “New Nordics” (Nordic and Baltic) region. Some are also investing in large European and North American hub cities.

The “green shoots” of recovery they see are appearing in anything digital that comes with a community, as well as among startups that are able to leverage the pandemic to generate new business models that are faster than incumbents.


Use discount code EXTRAKNASE to save 25% off a 1-year Extra Crunch membership.
This offer is only available to readers in Europe and expires on April 30, 2021.


We surveyed:


Sara Rywe, associate, byFounders

What trends are you most excited about investing in, generally?
Software and tech (I’m personally extra excited about the “future of work,” fintech, and “future of food”).

What’s your latest, most exciting investment?
Digitail (a veterinary software provider solving the gap between the ever-growing expectations of millennial pet parents and the experience offered by veterinarians with their current tools).

Are there startups that you wish you would see in the industry but don’t? What are some overlooked opportunities right now?
I would like to see more founders with global ambitions in the “uniquely transformative” software category (the same way Airbnb transformed the hotel industry and Uber transformed the taxi industry). Many startups we see today are building a feature instead of a full solution and their vision is about making industries incrementally better. So, here’s a callout to all of you Nordic or Baltic visionary founders out there: Write me!

What are you looking for in your next investment, in general?
We always look for competent, visionary and passionate founders building products that people love. As an industry-agnostic VC, we keep our eyes open for a range of different opportunities.

Which areas are either oversaturated or would be too hard to compete in at this point for a new startup? What other types of products/services are you wary or concerned about?
Some of the current trends that I see include:
Fintech: salary advances, factoring, sustainability reporting and measurements.
Food tech: alternative protein, pet food, food waste.
Future of work: virtual offices, collaboration, productivity tools.
If you decide to enter any of the above-mentioned industries, I therefore encourage you to really be thoughtful in how you differentiate yourself and/or how your team is better suited to execute on the mission.

How much are you focused on investing in your local ecosystem versus other startup hubs (or everywhere) in general? More than 50%? Less?
<50%. We invest across the Nordics and Baltics and I’m covering Sweden, Norway and Denmark.

Which industries in your city and region seem well positioned to thrive, or not, long term? What are companies you are excited about (your portfolio or not), which founders?
Denmark is very well positioned to succeed in sustainability and energy (many good talents coming from e.g., Vestas and DTU), consumer goods (there’s a large history in the country around building brands such as Lego, Carlsberg, etc.), and biotech (Novo Nordisk among others playing a big part). Moreover, software scaleups such as Peakon, Pleo, and Templafy are really leading the way for a new generation of tech startups to thrive in Denmark. When looking at Danish founder particularly, I’m very excited to see companies such as Qvin revolutionizing healthcare for women by using period blood as an opportunity for a noninvasive blood test.

How should investors in other cities think about the overall investment climate and opportunities in your city?
They should be very excited! Just look at what we’ve seen in 2021 so far:
Exits: Peakon $700 million exit and Humio $400 million exit.
Large rounds: Public.com raising $220 million, Vivino raising $115 million and Labster raising $60 million led by Andreessen Horowitz

Do you expect to see a surge in more founders coming from geographies outside major cities in the years to come, with startup hubs losing people due to the pandemic and lingering concerns, plus the attraction of remote work?
Somewhat. We already see a lot of innovation outside of Copenhagen in cities such as Aarhus and Odense.

Which industry segments that you invest in look weaker or more exposed to potential shifts in consumer and business behavior because of COVID-19? What are the opportunities startups may be able to tap into during these unprecedented times?
One industry that has been hit hard by COVID-19 is of course travel and hospitality. The flipside of this is that we see a lot of innovation due to that. Examples from our own portfolio include:
AeroGuest — a platform that allows for a “touch-free” travel experience (skipping lines and reception desks, direct online room booking, etc.).
BobW — a new type of sustainable travel accommodation bringing the best of both worlds: “home meets hotel.”

How has COVID-19 impacted your investment strategy? What are the biggest worries of the founders in your portfolio? What is your advice to startups in your portfolio right now?
COVID-19 has not impacted our investment strategy massively and we have the same focus as before (investing in software and tech). With that said, we are happy to see some industries getting an uplift in these difficult times, such as sustainability and impact.
The biggest worries of our portfolio company founders have been around volatility and uncertainty. Since the first lockdown our advice has been simple: You can’t control the outcome. We’ve therefore worked together to ensure that they have some proper scenario planning in place and that we think creatively of how to mitigate eventual negative effects on their business.

Are you seeing “green shoots” regarding revenue growth, retention or other momentum in your portfolio as they adapt to the pandemic?
Tame — one of our portfolio companies — expanded their event platform to also include virtual events, which made it really take off in COVID times.
Corti — another portfolio company of ours — could in less than four weeks build a product for helping fight COVID-19 with artificial intelligence.
Both of these companies are good examples of how “adapting their products” due to the pandemic led to great results.

What is a moment that has given you hope in the last month or so? This can be professional, personal or a mix of the two.
The sudden rise of awareness around impact and ESG among VCs! Several great conversations have been held on how to improve our ways of working.

Who are key startup people you see creating success locally, whether investors, founders or even other types of startup ecosystems roles like lawyers, designers, growth experts, etc. We’re trying to highlight the movers and shakers who outsiders might not know.
Some of the extraordinary founders that I look up to from Denmark include:
Jakob Jønck (Simple Feast), Andreas Cleve and Lars Maaløe (Corti), Sara Naseri and Søren Therkelsen (Qvin), Niels Martin Brochner, Jarek Owczarek and Viktor Heide (Contractbook), Jacob Hansen, Esben Friis-Jensen, Jakob Storm and Christian Hansen (Cobalt) among others.
There’s also a range of great investors in Denmark including Helle Uth, Christel Piron, Alexander Viterbo-Horten and Anders Kjær amongst others at PreSeed Ventures and Daniel Nyvang Mariussen with his team at Bumble Ventures. Also, the Danish tech ecosystem would not be what it is without all the work that Vækstfonden does.

Mads Hørlyck, associate, Maersk Growth

What trends are you most excited about investing in, generally?
Supply chain/logistics including sustainable supply chains.

What’s your latest, most exciting investment?
Afresh Technologies.

Are there startups that you wish you would see in the industry but don’t? What are some overlooked opportunities right now?
In general there are still plenty of opportunities across various parts of the supply chain. We have no particular specific preferences as such at the moment.

What are you looking for in your next investment, in general?
Digital solution to drive efficiencies across one or more subparts of the supply chain, both upstream and downstream focus.

Which areas are either oversaturated or would be too hard to compete in at this point for a new startup? What other types of products/services are you wary or concerned about?
Freight forwarding has been maturing in Europe and North America with several large startups in both regions. However, the market is still large but it requires a strong new model as it’s also low margins.

How much are you focused on investing in your local ecosystem versus other startup hubs (or everywhere) in general? More than 50%? Less?
Less/little focus on Denmark. Main priority in large European/North American hubs.

Which industries in your city and region seem well positioned to thrive, or not, long term? What are companies you are excited about (your portfolio or not), which founders?
Startups with the medical and supporting functions tech are doing well. We are excited about Onomondo in the Danish scene — also a portfolio company of ours.

How should investors in other cities think about the overall investment climate and opportunities in your city?
As an upcoming opportunity. Several tech hubs have been created and there is a general good environment including state-backed loans/pre-seed investments and fairly many angels to get going.

Do you expect to see a surge in more founders coming from geographies outside major cities in the years to come, with startup hubs losing people due to the pandemic and lingering concerns, plus the attraction of remote work?
We don’t expect any significant changes to the founder-environment in Denmark (too little country).

Which industry segments that you invest in look weaker or more exposed to potential shifts in consumer and business behavior because of COVID-19? What are the opportunities startups may be able to tap into during these unprecedented times?
We see an increased focus on our investment area: Supply chain/logistics as people throughout the pandemic have been much more exposed to and dependent on flexible and reliable supply chains. All the way from supply resilience, supply chain visibility, fulfillment and to last-mile delivery. Consumers have the power to drive changes in supply chains.

How has COVID-19 impacted your investment strategy? What are the biggest worries of the founders in your portfolio? What is your advice to startups in your portfolio right now?
Sales conversion rates decreasing/pipelines drying out. Advice is, like everyone else, to minimize cost and extend runway by getting as close to profitability as model allows. Based on this funding needs can be discussed.

Are you seeing “green shoots” regarding revenue growth, retention or other momentum in your portfolio as they adapt to the pandemic?
Yes, we have seen some startups being able to leverage the pandemic over incumbents due to their more flexible and digital structure.

What is a moment that has given you hope in the last month or so? This can be professional, personal or a mix of the two.
We have yet to see a default wave both globally within our investment area but also in general in Denmark.

Henrik Møller Kristensen, associate, Bumble Ventures

What trends are you most excited about investing in, generally?
Some of the trends we’re excited about are (1) the growing market of digital media and entertainment, in particular esports and gaming, (2) enterprise SaaS, e.g., related to the future of work, (3) climate change solutions, e.g., deep tech hardware and software, and (4) e-commerce businesses, in particular digital native vertical brands and direct-to-consumer cases.

Are there startups that you wish you would see in the industry but don’t? What are some overlooked opportunities right now?
Products and services to satisfy the needs of the aging population. The number of elderly people will be growing significantly over the next decades, establishing a growing market for products and services to satisfy the needs from this demographic change and reduce the pressure on societies.

What are you looking for in your next investment, in general?
We highly value team and traction. We are looking for exceptional founders with strong competencies in engineering, product and commercial, preferably with years of experience from the industry they are entering with a new solution. We prefer some indication of product-market fit. We like methodical revenue growth driven by paying customers, rich cohort grids and controllable funnels that proves a robust core business. We don’t like products that are still 2-3 years away from monetization. This means that we will miss the next Facebook, but we are okay with that.

Which areas are either oversaturated or would be too hard to compete in at this point for a new startup? What other types of products/services are you wary or concerned about?
Traditional social media and apps that require millions of users before being able to turn on the business model. SaaS marketing tools also seem crowded.

How much are you focused on investing in your local ecosystem versus other startup hubs (or everywhere) in general? More than 50%? Less?
Next week we will announce our first investment outside Denmark. This is our first step toward being present not only in Denmark, but in the Nordics.

Which industries in your city and region seem well positioned to thrive, or not, long term? What are companies you are excited about (your portfolio or not), which founders?
Well-positioned industries in Denmark are medtech, fintech, gaming and clean tech. We’re excited about GamerzClass, Pie Systems, LeadFamly, Omnigame, Organic Basics, Cap desk, Roccamore, Too Good To Go, Pleo, Tradeshift, SYBO, Unity and more. Exceptional founders are Victor Folmann from GamerzClass, Sunny Long from Pie Systems, Frederikke Antonie Schmidt from Roccamore and Christian Gabriel from Capdesk.

How should investors in other cities think about the overall investment climate and opportunities in your city?
Historically, there has been a need for more capital and talent to keep successful growth-stage startups in Denmark and not have to move to foreign countries to attract talent and capital. However, the investment climate is getting better. Greater access to capital and talent go hand in hand, and what is really changing the investment climate for the better is founders of successful Danish startups turning back to Denmark and reinvesting in the startup community.

Do you expect to see a surge in more founders coming from geographies outside major cities in the years to come, with startup hubs losing people due to the pandemic and lingering concerns, plus the attraction of remote work?
I think we’ll see more attraction to remote work in the future. However, I believe it is important for startups to be close to other great like-minded startups, founders, advisors and investors, not only virtually but in real life. Establishing a great network and personal relationships are very important factors to succeed and remote is not suited very well for that in my opinion.

Which industry segments that you invest in look weaker or more exposed to potential shifts in consumer and business behavior because of COVID-19? What are the opportunities startups may be able to tap into during these unprecedented times?
The travel and hospitality industry look weaker and we’ll see a shift toward lower demand due to remote work and sustainability issues. On the other side, gaming, e-commerce and digital products and services are growing as you will have more people online behind the screens.

How has COVID-19 impacted your investment strategy? What are the biggest worries of the founders in your portfolio? What is your advice to startups in your portfolio right now?
We are still happy to invest despite COVID-19. Gaming has, for example, been positively affected by COVID-19, however, many startups are also struggling due to COVID-19. The best a startup can do is to manage the runway, have close dialogue with their investors, cut costs and try to pivot to the changes. Look for opportunities, not boundaries.

Are you seeing “green shoots” regarding revenue growth, retention or other momentum in your portfolio as they adapt to the pandemic?
Not yet. Only a few of our portfolio companies are negatively affected by COVID-19.

What is a moment that has given you hope in the last month or so? This can be professional, personal or a mix of the two.
Investors are willing to make new investments and help out struggling portfolio companies. Founders are keeping their heads high and making the best out of the new circumstances. In some cases it actually stimulates new innovations.

Benjamin Ratz, partner, Nordic Makers

What trends are you most excited about investing in, generally?
Energy and the transition to a fossil fuel society, data as governance and the changing role of education.

What’s your latest, most exciting investment?
Seaborg — building modular, small and safe nuclear reactors.
Labster — virtual science labs that help students all over the world immerse in science and STEM.

Are there startups that you wish you would see in the industry but don’t? What are some overlooked opportunities right now?
Improving the public sector.

What are you looking for in your next investment, in general?
Views on how and if the world has permanently changed in behavior due to the pandemic.

Which areas are either oversaturated or would be too hard to compete in at this point for a new startup? What other types of products/services are you wary or concerned about?
Micromobility, teledocs.

How much are you focused on investing in your local ecosystem versus other startup hubs (or everywhere) in general? More than 50%? Less?
100%.

What are companies you are excited about (your portfolio or not), which founders?
Willa. Corti.

How should investors in other cities think about the overall investment climate and opportunities in your city?
A lot of founders leaving success stories of the region.

Do you expect to see a surge in more founders coming from geographies outside major cities in the years to come?
No but we expect the cities to produce more.

Mark Emil Hermansen, associate, Astanor

What trends are you most excited about investing in, generally?
Food and agrotech.

What’s your latest, most exciting investment?
DEMI.

Are there startups that you wish you would see in the industry but don’t? What are some overlooked opportunities right now?
I’d love to see more food tech companies that “get food” — the human element of it that is. Too many startups focus only on the technology, less on the fact that it should be deeply human centered. This is so prevalent that I instinctively stay away from startups dubbing themselves as “food tech” — food is not tech and tech is not food and therein lies the challenge and the prize. Here’s a read that kind of sums it up.

What are you looking for in your next investment, in general?
Anything that reminds me of these first lines from “On The Road”: “They danced down the streets like dingledodies, and I shambled after as I’ve been doing all my life after people who interest me, because the only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones that never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn …”.

Which areas are either oversaturated or would be too hard to compete in at this point for a new startup? What other types of products/services are you wary or concerned about?
DNVB.

How much are you focused on investing in your local ecosystem versus other startup hubs (or everywhere) in general? More than 50%? Less?
25% local (DK is still immature from a startup standout — yet the opportunity is that the VC footprint is small and relatively unsophisticated).

Which industries in your city and region seem well positioned to thrive, or not, long term? What are companies you are excited about (your portfolio or not), which founders?
Companies: Online communities such as DEMI.
Founder: Erez Galonska of Infarm.

How should investors in other cities think about the overall investment climate and opportunities in your city?
Tons of opportunity if you have access to the right deal flow/pedigree.

Which industry segments that you invest in look weaker or more exposed to potential shifts in consumer and business behavior because of COVID-19? What are the opportunities startups may be able to tap into during these unprecedented times?
Communities that transcend digital (like Tonsser and DEMI).

How has COVID-19 impacted your investment strategy? What are the biggest worries of the founders in your portfolio? What is your advice to startups in your portfolio right now?
Worries: Uncertainty and recruitment strategy.
Advice: Survive and prepare.

Are you seeing “green shoots” regarding revenue growth, retention or other momentum in your portfolio as they adapt to the pandemic?
Anything physical that has retail footprint. Anything digital that has a community footprint.

What is a moment that has given you hope in the last month or so? This can be professional, personal or a mix of the two.
That everyone’s pumped for what’s about to come (post-COVID) and the realization (or hope?) that nothing will be as before.

Who are key startup people you see creating success locally?
Kasper Ottesen, Highbridge (legal).
Kasper Hulthin (entrepreneur and investor).
Christian Tang-Jespersen (investor).

Eric Lagier, managing partner, byFounders

What trends are you most excited about investing in, generally?
Future of work, productivity improvement platforms.

What’s your latest, most exciting investment?
Normative.

Are there startups that you wish you would see in the industry but don’t? What are some overlooked opportunities right now?
Future of recruiting.

What are you looking for in your next investment, in general?
Passionate founders, solving big problems to build a better tomorrow.

How much are you focused on investing in your local ecosystem versus other startup hubs (or everywhere) in general? More than 50%? Less?
We are focused on the New Nordics (Nordic and Baltic) region having shown the biggest growth potential in Europe.

Which industries in your city and region seem well positioned to thrive, or not, long term? What are companies you are excited about (your portfolio or not), which founders?
Climate tech, health tech, fintech. Normative, Corti, Lucinity.

How should investors in other cities think about the overall investment climate and opportunities in your city?
Copenhagen is booming and there is now a strong foundation of experienced founders building really transformative companies.

Do you expect to see a surge in more founders coming from geographies outside major cities in the years to come, with startup hubs losing people due to the pandemic and lingering concerns, plus the attraction of remote work?
No — but I expect to see much more diverse teams with a priority on remote first.

Which industry segments that you invest in look weaker or more exposed to potential shifts in consumer and business behavior because of COVID-19? What are the opportunities startups may be able to tap into during these unprecedented times?
An acceleration of online, remote, e-commerce and general faster pace of transactions.

How has COVID-19 impacted your investment strategy? What are the biggest worries of the founders in your portfolio? What is your advice to startups in your portfolio right now?
COvid-19 is a giant accelerator of future trends. Those founders that have adapted best will be the winners of tomorrow.

Are you seeing “green shoots” regarding revenue growth, retention or other momentum in your portfolio as they adapt to the pandemic?
Absolutely.

What is a moment that has given you hope in the last month or so? This can be professional, personal or a mix of the two.
How founders persevere in these times of massive change.

Who are key startup people you see creating success locally?
Jakob Jønck, founder, SimpleFeast; Kristian Rönn, founder, Normative; Andreas Cleve and Lars Maaløe, founders, Corti.

#byfounders, #copenhagen, #denmark, #ec-investor-surveys, #europe, #nordics, #tc

Calling Oslo VCs: Be featured in The Great TechCrunch Survey of European VC

TechCrunch is embarking on a major project to survey the venture capital investors of Europe, and their cities.

Our survey of VCs in Oslo and Norway will capture how the country is faring, and what changes are being wrought amongst investors by the coronavirus pandemic.

We’d like to know how Norway’s startup scene is evolving, how the tech sector is being impacted by COVID-19, and, generally, how your thinking will evolve from here.

Our survey will only be about investors, and only the contributions of VC investors will be included. More than one partner is welcome to fill out the survey. (Please note, if you have filled the survey out already, there is no need to do it again).

The shortlist of questions will require only brief responses, but the more you can add, the better.

You can fill out the survey here.

Obviously, investors who contribute will be featured in the final surveys, with links to their companies and profiles.

What kinds of things do we want to know? Questions include: Which trends are you most excited by? What startup do you wish someone would create? Where are the overlooked opportunities? What are you looking for in your next investment, in general? How is your local ecosystem going? And how has COVID-19 impacted your investment strategy?

This survey is part of a broader series of surveys we’re doing to help founders find the right investors.

https://techcrunch.com/extra-crunch/investor-surveys/

For example, here is the recent survey of London.

You are not in Norway, but would like to take part? That’s fine! Any European VC investor can STILL fill out the survey, as we probably will be putting a call out to your country next anyway! And we will use the data for future surveys on vertical topics.

The survey is covering almost every country on in the Union for the Mediterranean, so just look for your country and city on the survey and please participate (if you’re a venture capital investor).

Thank you for participating. If you have questions you can email mike@techcrunch.com

(Please note: Filling out the survey is not a guarantee of inclusion in the final published piece).

#corporate-finance, #denmark, #economy, #entrepreneurship, #europe, #finance, #london, #money, #norway, #oslo, #private-equity, #startup-company, #tc, #venture-capital

Calling Danish VCs: Be featured in The Great TechCrunch Survey of European VC

TechCrunch is embarking on a major project to survey the venture capital investors of Europe, and their cities.

Our <a href=”https://forms.gle/k4Ji2Ch7zdrn7o2p6”>survey of VCs in Copenhagen and Denmark will capture how the country is faring, and what changes are being wrought amongst investors by the coronavirus pandemic.

We’d like to know how Denmark’s startup scene is evolving, how the tech sector is being impacted by COVID-19, and, generally, how your thinking will evolve from here.

Our survey will only be about investors, and only the contributions of VC investors will be included. More than one partner is welcome to fill out the survey. (Please note, if you have filled the survey out already, there is no need to do it again).

The shortlist of questions will require only brief responses, but the more you can add, the better.

You can fill out the survey here.

Obviously, investors who contribute will be featured in the final surveys, with links to their companies and profiles.

What kinds of things do we want to know? Questions include: Which trends are you most excited by? What startup do you wish someone would create? Where are the overlooked opportunities? What are you looking for in your next investment, in general? How is your local ecosystem going? And how has COVID-19 impacted your investment strategy?

This survey is part of a broader series of surveys we’re doing to help founders find the right investors.

https://techcrunch.com/extra-crunch/investor-surveys/

For example, here is the recent survey of London.

You are not in Denmark, but would like to take part? That’s fine! Any European VC investor can STILL fill out the survey, as we probably will be putting a call out to your country next anyway! And we will use the data for future surveys on vertical topics.

The survey is covering almost every country on in the Union for the Mediterranean, so just look for your country and city on the survey and please participate (if you’re a venture capital investor).

Thank you for participating. If you have questions you can email mike@techcrunch.com

(Please note: Filling out the survey is not a guarantee of inclusion in the final published piece).

#articles, #business, #copenhagen, #corporate-finance, #denmark, #economy, #entrepreneurship, #europe, #london, #mediterranean, #private-equity, #startup-company, #survey, #tc, #venture-capital

The Sinking of a Bust Surfaces a Debate Over Denmark’s Past

An artists’ group, criticized as vandals for dumping the bust of an 18th-century king, Frederik V, into Copenhagen Harbor, says it wanted to draw attention to Denmark’s role in slave trading.

#art, #colleges-and-universities, #colonization, #denmark, #dirckinck-holmfeld-katrine, #frederik-v-1723-66, #monuments-and-memorials-structures, #royal-danish-academy-of-fine-arts-copenhagen-denmark, #slavery-historical, #vandalism

Book Review: ‘The Copenhagen Trilogy,’ by Tove Ditlevsen

Tove Ditlevsen’s memoirs, collected in “The Copenhagen Trilogy,” are bracing accounts of her childhood, writing career and struggles with addiction.

#books-and-literature, #content-type-personal-profile, #denmark, #ditlevsen-tove, #the-copenhagen-trilogy-childhood-youth-dependency-book, #writing-and-writers

Glastonbury Festival Canceled for a Second Year Due to Pandemic

Britain’s biggest music event won’t take place for a second year in a row. The decision has sent shock waves across Europe, where festivals have already been asking politicians for help.

#barcelona-spain, #belgium, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #denmark, #festivals, #glastonbury-festival-of-contemporary-performing-arts, #great-britain, #music, #quarantine-life-and-culture

‘The Copenhagen Trilogy,’ a Sublime Set of Memoirs About Growing Up, Writing and Addiction

Tove Ditlevsen’s three memoirs — “Childhood,” “Youth” and “Dependency” — recall her beautiful, cruel mother and the author’s headlong dive into addiction.

#books-and-literature, #content-type-personal-profile, #denmark, #ditlevsen-tove, #goldman-michael-favala-translator, #nunnally-tiina, #the-copenhagen-trilogy-childhood-youth-dependency-book

Mads Mikkelsen Dancing Days Were Over Until ‘Another Round’

The actor Mads Mikkelsen ends Thomas Vinterberg’s film with a wild delight of a drunken dance. The man, once a professional dancer, can move.

#another-round-movie, #content-type-personal-profile, #dancing, #denmark, #graham-martha, #mikkelsen-mads, #movies, #vinterberg-thomas

How Mink, Like Humans, Were Slammed by the Coronavirus

Rampaging infections at farms caused scandal, scientific head-scratching and a search for a vaccine — for mink.

#agriculture-and-farming, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #coronavirus-risks-and-safety-concerns, #denmark, #direct-action-everywhere, #ecohealth-alliance, #epstein-jonathan-h, #fur, #minks-animals, #utah, #your-feed-science