What’s Holding Up New Omicron Vaccines?

Vaccine makers worry yet another variant will start dominating in the months it takes to roll out shots against this one

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #vaccines

Some COVID Patients Need Amputations to Survive

Impaired blood flow leads to loss of limbs

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Hungry Hyenas Can Help Human Health

Hyenas scavenging near cities might lessen human and livestock diseases

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New Sensor Tells You How Well Your Mask Is Working

FaceBit tracks a face covering’s fit and wear time, as well as its wearer’s vital signs

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Surgeons Transplant Pig’s Heart into Dying Human Patient in a First

It was a last-ditch effort to save Maryland man’s life

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Nurses Struggle through a New COVID Wave with Rage and Compassion

A critical care nurse confronts the Omicron surge filling her hospital

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Flurona Is a Great Example of How Misinformation Blooms

A catchy name has spawned false statements and panic over being infected with two viruses at once

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #public-health

How Communication Around COVID Fuels a Mistrust of Science

The move highlights the growing problems that arise when federal agencies ignore scientific data

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Preparing for the Next Plague

SARS-CoV-2 adds impetus to the race for broad-spectrum countermeasures against future global infectious scourges

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#health, #pharmaceuticals

Flurona detected in Israeli woman just as new COVID-19 variant IHU discovered in France

Pregnant woman photo-pregnancy


Israel is reporting its first case of what’s called “flurona”, when a person can have two infections influenza and  coronavirus  at the same time. It was detected in a pregnant woman who had mild symptoms. This discovery comes as a new variant of COVID-19 called  varient caleed IHU has been detected in France.

#health

Flurona: what we know so far about the rare new double infection

 

Flurona
Image Credit(AP)


It sounds more like science fiction the more you hear it: The first case of Flurona, a new and rare  double infection of coronavirus and influenza, was discovered in an unvaccinated pregnant Israeli young  woman, according to doctors at Beilinson Hospital in the city from Petach Tikva out of the country.
Israel is currently seeing a surge in Omicron, with over 9,000 cases registered yesterday, and while there are no confirmed cases in the UK and the patient is  experiencing mild symptoms, her two positive  results have raised concerns about the possibility of a new double infection. How common is it? Could the falls in the UK? Could two infections cause a more serious illness?
From symptoms to look out for to how likely they are to spread, this is what we knew about Flurona so far.

How did flurona come about?

As the name suggests, flurona describes a rare double infection of both coronavirus and influenza. The term has emerged over recent days following the finding of a patient in Israel who tested positive for both diseases when she came into hospital on Thursday – the first recorded case in the world. 

The young woman is pregnant and is reported to only have mild symptoms, but health officials have quickly started studying her case to determine whether the combination causes any greater severity of illness. 

“She was diagnosed with the flu and coronavirus as soon as she arrived,” Professor Arnon Vizhnitser, director of the hospitals’ Gynaecology Department, told Jewish newspaper Hamodia. 

“Both tests came back positive, even after we checked again. The disease is the same disease. They’re viral and cause difficulty breathing since both attack the upper respiratory tract.”

According to latest reports, the patient is expected to be discharged on Thursday. 

What are the symptoms?

It is difficult for scientists to pinpoint an exact set of symptoms, but flurona’s most common effects are likely to be a combination of those of Covid and influenza. 

The Israeli patient did reportedly exhibit breathing difficulties and since Omicron already exhibits many of the same symptoms as the flu or a cold, the main effects are likely to include a high temperature, fatigue, aches, sneezing, a dry cough and/or scratchy throat. 

Prof Vizhnitser confirmed that both infections are viral and cause difficulty breathing. “The disease is the same disease,” he said. “They’re viral and cause difficulty breathing since both attack the upper respiratory tract.”

How likely is it to spread?

Much about the infectiousness and seriousness of flurona remains unknown, but doctors have confirmed that other cases are likely to emerge – a result of rising flu cases as restrictions ease along with the fast spread of the Omicron variant. 

“We are seeing more and more pregnant women with the flu,” said Prof Vizhnitser. “It is definitely a great challenge dealing with a woman who comes in with a fever at childbirth.

“This is especially when you do not know if it’s coronavirus or the flu, so you refer to them the same. Most of the illness is respiratory.”

Source: Yahoo News

#health

How AI Could Prevent the Development of New Illicit Drugs

The DarkNPS algorithm has predicted the formulas of millions of potential drugs

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Latin American Abortion Laws Hurt Health Care and the Economy–a Lesson for a Post-Roe U.S.

A region with some of the world’s most restrictive abortion laws has started to tentatively move in the opposite direction

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Whistleblower warns baffling illness affects growing number of young adults in Canadian province

Neurological disease
Medical imaging service in a hospital in Savoie, France. A technician monitors a brain MRI scan session. 
BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

A whistleblower spoke to The Guardian about a mysterious neurological disease in New Brunswick, Canada. 

They spoke of their concerns about the disease, saying that it was spreading rapidly and that the cases could be higher than previously thought. 

Symptoms include fatigue, hallucinations, muscle weakness, and an anonymous Canadian whistleblower from Vitalité Health Network, one of New Brunswick’s two health authorities,  said that more people are developing symptoms of a mysterious degenerative neurological disease, according to The Guardian.

The Atlantic coast of Canada has been analyzed by researchers for more than two years, but the cause of the disease is not yet known.


Symptoms of the disease include memory problems, muscle cramps, inexplicable extreme  weight loss, pain in the extremities, and hallucinations. 

The disease was originally thought to be a human prion disease, in which proteins called prions cause normal proteins to bend abnormally, but tests have shown that it doesn’t . 

So far, the Office of the New Brunswick  Medical Director of Health has publicly said that 48 people have  the disease, but sources told The Guardian that that number is believed to be much higher the disease, said the bureau.


Speaking to The Guardian about the severity of the disease, the whistleblower said he would go public to raise awareness of how quickly the enigmatic disease is spreading and affecting patients: 

“I’m really concerned about these cases because They appear to be evolving The disease affects women and men equally,  patients since 1885. 

An epidemiological study conducted by the New Brunswick Department of Health ruled out any food, behavioral, or environmental stresses that could cause the disease. 

Following that statement, a document was submitted to the Canadian Association of Neuropathologists claiming that  those who died from the disease died from misdiagnosis or missed diagnoses, such as Alzheimer’s and cancer, and were not part of the group.

#health

Genetic Therapies for Brain Diseases

Hopes are high for a class of drug that could treat neurodegenerative conditions—but a recent clinical trial has brought the field up short

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#features, #health, #medicine, #neurology

Mindfulness Can Improve Your Attention and Health

A focus on the present, dubbed “mindfulness,” can make you happier and healthier. Training to deepen your immersion in the moment works by improving attention

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#behavior, #cognition, #features, #health, #mental-health, #mindbrain

South Africa lifts curfew as it says COVID-19 fourth wave peaked

South Africa  lifted the nightly curfew at 4 a.m. The course of the pandemic,  vaccination rates in the country and available capacity in the health sector, according to a press release from Mondli Gungubele, Minister of the Presidency, South Africa is currently at the lowest of its five phases of alert.

 “All indicators suggest that the country may have passed the peak of the fourth wave at the national level,” said a statement from the special cabinet meeting  on Thursday.

Health ministry data showed an increase in the number of newly discovered cases  in the week ending Jan.


Health ministry data showed an increase in the South Africa was the hardest hit country in Africa during the pandemic, with around 3.5 million infections and 91,000 deaths in  both cases.

In addition to lifting  restrictions on public movement, the government said meetings will be limited to no more than 1,000 people indoors and no more than 2,000 people outdoors.

It also ruled that liquor stores would be allowed to operate beyond 11 p.m. (2100GMT) could revert  to full licensing terms, which is a welcome boon for merchants and businesses hard hit by the pandemic and looking to recover over the holiday season.

The Omicron variant is highly transferable, there were lower hospitalization rates  than in the previous waves, “said the cabinet, adding that the use of masks in public places was still mandatory. Masking when required is still a crime in South Africa.

#health

What Causes Alcohol-Induced Blackouts?

In search of answers, a neurobiologist looks to rodents

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#cognition, #health, #mindbrain, #neurology, #neuroscience

A COVID Vaccine for All

With proved technology and no-frills tech transfer, CORBEVAX is poised to reach hundreds of millions in the coming weeks

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#health, #vaccines

After COVID-19 Successes, Researchers Push to Develop mRNA Vaccines for Other Diseases

mRNA vaccines are now in the limelight as a key tool for tackling COVID-19, but the technology was originally developed for other diseases, such as cancer, that researchers are now hoping to treat

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#features, #health, #medicine

A $1-Billion Boost to the NCI Will Help Us Beat Cancer

The organization’s underfunding means critical research is not being done

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#cancer, #health

Medical Algorithms Need Better Regulation

Many do not require FDA approval, and those that do often do not undergo clinical trials

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#computing, #forum, #health, #inequality, #medicine, #technology

The Pandemic Has Created a ‘Zoom Boom’ in Remote Psychotherapy

Research suggests virtual sessions can be as effective as in-person meetings

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #mental-health, #mindbrain, #the-science-of-health

Omicron’s Effect Won’t Be as Mild as Hoped

It’s too soon to know if the variant causes milder COVID, but its transmissibility and ability to evade vaccines are still cause for concern

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#epidemiology, #health

Equity in Health Care Is Essential

How to improve well-being by fighting bias, discrimination and ignorance

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #inequality

Being Denied an Abortion Has Lasting Impacts on Health and Finances

A landmark study of women seeking abortions shows the harms of being unable to end an unwanted pregnancy

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#health, #politics, #reproduction

The Biden Administration Should Offer Free, At-Home COVID testing

The federal testing strategy has tried to improve availability, but still puts the burden on people to find expensive tests that are often in short supply

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#health, #public-health

How Severe Are Omicron Infections?

A rapidly spreading variant could dangerously strain health-care systems, even if the severe disease risk is relatively low for an individual

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #public-health

COVID Quickly, Episode 21: Vaccines Against Omicron, and Pandemic Progress

Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the…

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #vaccines

Black Children, as Well as Other Minority Kids, Fare Worse Than White Children in Common Surgeries

The reasons for unequal patient outcomes may lie in implicit biases at the hospitals that treat them

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#health, #inequality, #the-science-of-health

Why Is Omicron So Contagious?

The new coronavirus variant may be better than other versions at avoiding human immune defenses—but that ability may change in different countries

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#epidemiology, #health

The Risk of Vaccinated COVID Transmission Is Not Low

After my son got sick, I dived into the data, and it turns out vaccinated people can and do spread COVID

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#health, #vaccines

Rapid COVID Tests Could Help Curb Infections–Especially During the Holidays

An expert answers questions about when and how to use the tests

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #public-health

Omicron Is Likely to Weaken COVID Vaccine Protection–But Boosters Could Restore It

The rapid spread of new variants such as Omicron offers clues to how SARS-CoV-2 is adapting and how the pandemic will play out over the next several months

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #vaccines

COVID Variants Hint at How the Virus Will Evolve

The rapid spread of new variants such as Omicron offers clues to how SARS-CoV-2 is adapting and how the pandemic will play out over the next several months

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#biology, #epidemiology, #health, #public-health

Abortion Doesn’t Have to Be an Either-Or Conversation

Treating the decision with nuance and care is essential to reproductive justice

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #reproduction

Boosters Can Help End the COVID Pandemic

The extra shot doesn’t mean that vaccines are ineffective; our bodies just need a reminder

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #vaccines

How Scientists Can Update COVID Vaccines against Omicron

A microbiologist explains how Pfizer and Moderna would rapidly adjust mRNA vaccines

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #vaccines

Texas Toughens Ban on Medication-by-Mail Abortions

A new law threatens jail time and hefty fines for anyone who prescribes the pills online or by mail

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #reproduction

COVID Quickly, Episode 20: The Omicron Scare, and Anti-COVID Pills Are Coming

Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the…

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#epidemiology, #health, #public-health, #vaccines

Women’s Heart Health Is Not Just about Hormones

Heart disease risk increases as women get older, but explanations that center on changes after menopause don’t tell the full story

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#health, #medicine

How the Omicron Variant Got So Many Scary Mutations So Quickly

The numerous changes in the coronavirus’s spike protein could have arisen in an isolated population or an immunocompromised person, or in animals

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Cells or Drugs? The Race to Regenerate the Heart

Researchers are debating how to convince the heart to heal itself instead of laying down scar tissue after a heart attack

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Conservative Justices Seem Poised to Overturn Roe’s Abortion Rights

Justices heard arguments Wednesday in a case over a Mississippi law that would ban most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy

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COVID’s Cardiac Connection

Coronavirus infections might cause lasting harm to the heart even in those who have never had symptoms

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Is There More to a Healthy-Heart Diet Than Cholesterol?

A high-fat diet is thought to increase the risk of a heart attack. But some say that the long-held dogma of “bad” cholesterol might be flawed

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The Benefits of Vaccinating Kids against COVID Far Outweigh the Risks of Myocarditis

Vaccination is likely to prevent many more COVID cases than it is to cause a rare and nonfatal heart side effect in 5–11-year-olds

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Immune Cells That Remember Inflammation Could Offer Treatment Targets for Atherosclerosis

A type of immune-cell priming called trained immunity is helping researchers to understand the disease mechanisms behind the buildup of fatty deposits in arteries

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Inflammation in Heart Disease: Do Researchers Know Enough?

Anti-inflammatory therapies for cardiovascular disease are nearing the clinic. But whether scientists understand how inflammation contributes to fatty-deposit buildup well enough to target it…

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Why COVID Deaths Have Surpassed AIDS Deaths in the U.S.

On World AIDS Day, why global COVID deaths are a fraction of global AIDS deaths

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#health, #public-health