Croatia’s Gideon Brothers raises $31M for its 
3D vision-enabled autonomous warehouse robots

Proving that Central and Eastern Europe remains a powerhouse of hardware engineering matched with software, Gideon Brothers (GB), a Zagreb, Croatia-based robotics and AI startup, has raised a $31 million Series A round led by Koch Disruptive Technologies (KDT), the venture and growth arm of Koch Industries Inc., with participation from DB Schenker, Prologis Ventures, and Rite-Hite.

The round also includes participation from several of Gideon Brothers’ existing backers: Taavet Hinrikus (co-founder of TransferWise), Pentland Ventures, Peaksjah, HCVC (Hardware Club), Ivan Topčić, Nenad Bakić, and Luca Ascani.

The investment will be used to accelerate the development and commercialization of GB’s AI and 3D vision-based ‘autonomous mobile robots’ or ‘AMRs’. These perform simple tasks such as transporting, picking up, and dropping off products in order to free up humans to perform more valuable tasks.

The company will also expand its operations in the EU and US by opening offices in Munich, Germany and Boston, Massachusetts, respectively.

Gideon Brothers founders

Gideon Brothers founders

Gideon Brothers make robots and the accompanying software platform that specializes in horizontal and vertical handling processes for logistics, warehousing, manufacturing, and retail businesses. For obvious reasons, the need to roboticize supply chains has exploded during the pandemic.

Matija Kopić, CEO of Gideon Brothers, said: “The pandemic has greatly accelerated the adoption of smart automation, and we are ready to meet the unprecedented market demand. The best way to do it is by marrying our proprietary solutions with the largest, most demanding customers out there. Our strategic partners have real challenges that our robots are already solving, and, with us, they’re seizing the incredible opportunity right now to effect robotic-powered change to some of the world’s most innovative organizations.”

He added: “Partnering with these forward-thinking industry leaders will help us expand our global footprint, but we will always stay true to our Croatian roots. That is our superpower. The Croatian start-up scene is growing exponentially and we want to unlock further opportunities for our country to become a robotics & AI powerhouse.”

Annant Patel, Director at Koch Disruptive Technologies said: “With more than 300 Koch operations and production units globally, KDT recognizes the unique capabilities of and potential for Gideon Brothers’ technology to substantially transform how businesses can approach warehouse and manufacturing processes through cutting edge AI and 3D AMR technology.”

Xavier Garijo, Member of the Board of Management for Contract Logistics, DB Schenker added: “Our partnership with Gideon Brothers secures our access to best in class robotics and intelligent material handling solutions to serve our customers in the most efficient way.”

GB’s competitors include Seegrid, Teradyne (MiR), Vecna Robotics, Fetch Robotics, AutoGuide Mobile Robots, Geek+ and Otto Motors.

#articles, #artificial-intelligence, #boston, #central-europe, #ceo, #co-founder, #croatia, #db-schenker, #director, #eastern-europe, #europe, #european-union, #fetch-robotics, #geek, #germany, #gideon-brothers, #hardware-club, #koch-disruptive-technologies, #manufacturing, #massachusetts, #munich, #otto-motors, #robot, #robotics, #science-and-technology, #software-platform, #taavet-hinrikus, #tc, #teradyne, #transferwise, #united-states, #zagreb

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A 7-Year-Old Was Accused of Rape. Is Arresting Him the Answer?

“Science doesn’t support prosecution of second graders,” one lawyer said. Still, in New York, children as young as 7 can be charged with a crime.

#childrens-defense-fund, #juvenile-delinquency, #law-and-legislation, #massachusetts, #new-york-state, #perry-n-nick

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A New York 7-Year-Old Was Accused of Rape. Is Arresting Him the Answer?

“Science doesn’t support prosecution of second graders,” one lawyer said. Still, in New York, children as young as 7 can be charged with a crime.

#childrens-defense-fund, #juvenile-delinquency, #law-and-legislation, #massachusetts, #new-york-state, #perry-n-nick

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Why The Coronavirus Pandemic Was a Breakout Moment for the Cannabis Industry

For many Americans, having enough marijuana was as essential as stocking up on toilet paper. And suppliers found a way to get it to them.

#aether-gardens, #canna-provisions, #florida, #fluent-cannabis, #las-vegas-nev, #marijuana, #massachusetts, #quarantine-life-and-culture, #shopping-and-retail, #small-business

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A Funny Thing Happened While Researching Algorithms

Carrington Moore signed up for a dating app to better understand user preferences for a start-up business. Then he came across Schnelle Shelby’s profile.

#massachusetts, #online-dating, #weddings-and-engagements

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An ‘Army of 16-Year-Olds’ Takes On the Democrats

Young progressives are an unpredictable new factor in Massachusetts elections. They’re ardent, and organized, and they don’t take orders.

#democratic-party, #elections-mayors, #elections-senate, #kennedy-joseph-p-iii, #markey-edward-j, #massachusetts, #social-media, #voting-and-voters

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Artists in a Post-George Floyd, Mid-Pandemic World

Two new exhibitions at Mass MoCA created over the past year offer insights into our new normal.

#aguilar-laura-1959-2018, #art, #bass-chloe, #demonstrations-protests-and-riots, #glenn-kaino, #hassinger-maren, #massachusetts, #massachusetts-museum-of-contemporary-art, #museums

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White Police Officer to Face Charge She Intimidated Son’s Black Friend

Officer Patricia Lio of the Milton Police Department in Massachusetts is accused of berating her son’s 14-year-old Black friend about his stance on the Black Lives Matter movement.

#black-lives-matter-movement, #black-people, #crime-and-criminals, #discrimination, #lio-patricia, #massachusetts, #milton-police-department, #police

0

Many Mayors Cite Covid Burnout as a Reason for Their Exit

Local officials nationwide are announcing plans to step back from elected office. Many offer the same explanation: Covid burnout.

#anxiety-and-stress, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #de-la-isla-michelle, #elections-mayors, #massachusetts, #mayors, #mcgee-thomas-m, #shutdowns-institutional

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Fed Up With Remote Learning, Governors Make a Push to Reopen Schools

A bipartisan group of governors decided to flex its muscle and get students back into classrooms, despite union resistance and bureaucratic hesitancy.

#baker-charles-d-jr, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #coronavirus-reopenings, #dewine-mike, #education-k-12, #governors-us, #inslee-jay, #massachusetts, #ohio, #teachers-and-school-employees, #washington-state

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Sweeping climate law zeroes out carbon pollution for Massachusetts

(credit: MIT News)

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker signed into law late last week one of the nation’s most sweeping climate bills, putting the state on a path to net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. 

The law sets emissions limits of 50 percent below 1990 levels by 2030 and 75 percent cuts by 2040 with interim limits every five years. To achieve those goals, the Bay State will add gigawatts of offshore wind power, spur cities and towns to adopt a net-zero building code, and set targets for electric vehicles, charging stations, and energy storage. 

The state expects that it will be able to fully eliminate 85 percent of all carbon emissions by 2050. For the remaining 15 percent, it will have to find other options, including tree planting or direct air capture of carbon dioxide. The net-zero target of 2050 is encouraged by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to avoid warming of greater than 1.5˚ C.

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#climate, #climate-change, #climate-policy, #energy, #energy-policy, #massachusetts, #policy, #science

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Excellence Runs in the Family. Her Novel’s Heroine Wants Something Else.

Kaitlyn Greenidge and her sisters achieved success in their respective fields. In her historical novel, “Libertie,” she focuses on a Black woman who doesn’t yearn to be the first or only one of anything.

#black-people, #books-and-literature, #content-type-personal-profile, #greenidge-kaitlyn, #greenidge-kerri, #greenidge-kirsten, #libertie-a-novel-book, #massachusetts, #reconstruction-era, #weeksville-heritage-center-brooklyn-ny, #writing-and-writers

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‘Dear G.I.’: An Unlikely Friendship Built on Letters From a Foxhole

In 1966, a Massachusetts mother of three began writing to young men serving in Vietnam. One became her most steadfast pen pal, writing her 77 letters over seven years.

#black-people, #letters, #massachusetts, #north-carolina, #politics-and-government, #veterans, #vietnam-war

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Three Feet or Six? Distancing Guideline for Schools Stirs Debate

Some public health officials say it’s time for the C.D.C. to loosen its social distancing guidelines for classrooms, but the idea has detractors.

#boston-mass, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #coronavirus-reopenings, #coronavirus-risks-and-safety-concerns, #education-k-12, #massachusetts, #your-feed-health, #your-feed-science

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Appfire, provider of Atlassian apps, raises $100M to continue its buying spree

Appfire, a Boston-based provider of software development apps, announced Tuesday that it has received a $100 million investment from growth private equity firm TA Associates.

Founded in 2005, Appfire was bootstrapped until it got $49 million from Silversmith Capital Partners last May. Since that time, Appfire has acquired six companies in the Atlassian “ecosystem,” including Botron, Beecom, Innovalog, Navarambh, Artemis and Bolo.

The Boston-based company has been profitable for over a decade, according to Randall Ward, co-founder and CEO of Appfire. And while Ward declined to reveal valuation or hard revenue numbers, he did say that Appfire has seen its ARR more than double over the past year.

Since last June alone, the company says it has experienced:

  • A 103% year over year increase in ARR.
  • A 258% YOY increase in enterprise subscription revenue (data center only). 
  • A 182% YOY increase in all subscription revenue (data center and cloud).  

So why the need for institutional capital? With the latest funding, Appfire intends to extend its buying spree of complementary apps. 

Appfire has been acquiring businesses every six to eight weeks, and it plans to continue scooping them up at that pace, according to Ward.

It’s also looking to let shareholders cash in on their options.

Fun fact: Atlassian itself was bootstrapped for nearly a decade. The Australian enterprise software company was profitable from its inception in 2001 before taking its first round of external capital, a $60 million financing led by Accel, in July 2010. The financing was primarily secondary.

Some context

Appfire was initially a professional services company before transitioning into products in 2013. The company says it has “developed domain expertise in creating, launching and distributing apps” through the Atlassian marketplace. Today, the company has 85 products on that marketplace and more than 110,000 active installations globally spanning workflow automation, business intelligence, publishing and administrative tools. 

Specifically, the company’s Bob Swift, Feed Three and Wittified brand apps aim to help companies like Google, Amazon and Starbucks streamline product development through improved collaboration, security, reporting and automation.

“We started this business 15 years ago with the goal of building software applications for customers,” Ward told TechCrunch. “At that time, there were no marketplaces, so iTunes marketplace didn’t exist, Google Play didn’t exist, but yet we were seeing that applications were getting smaller in size, Mozilla was putting out plugins. My co-founder and I were sitting on the floor of a warehouse in Maynard, Massachusetts and we conceived of this company called Appfire, and boy did we pick the right name.”

The pair then stumbled upon a project by which a friend of a friend was looking for them to integrate two pieces of software with software from Atlassian.

“It was brand new to us — we had never heard of it — a software called JIRA and another piece of software called Confluence,” Ward recalls. “About three months later we launched a project and then got introduced to the co-founders of Atlassian.”

In 2017, Appfire decided it wanted to focus full time on becoming “the biggest app platform and aggregator.”

“So we decided to wind down all the other little special side projects for Atlassian delivering services to customers, and really put all of our eggs in this marketplace basket,” Ward recalls. 

It was at that point the company began looking for external capital. With this last raise, though, Ward says Appfire was not necessarily looking for more cash.

When approached by TA, Appfire asked if it could create more employee equity programs so the company could be an employee-led business. It also asked if it could take 1% of its equity and contribute to the Pledge 1% initiative.

“They said yes,” Ward said. “So that led us to this latest funding.”

Appfire is also moving into business intelligence and data analytics apps for Tableau and Microsoft Power BI.

As mentioned above, some of its latest funding will go back to existing shareholders, Ward said. The remainder will go into continuing to grow the business.

“We have a lot of organic and inorganic growth opportunities,” he added. “…That obviously takes some momentum.”

Michael Libert, a principal of TA Associates, said his firm had been tracking Appfire’s progress for “quite some time.” The company’s apps, he said, do not require complex training, allowing customers to improve productivity “at a low cost,” leading to further customer adoption and enabling “a solid land-and-expand strategy.”

“We found the company’s high-quality business model, impressive organic growth and recent significant acquisitive activity particularly attractive,” Libert told TechCrunch.

#appfire, #apps, #atlassian, #boston, #business, #business-intelligence, #cloud, #confluence, #economy, #enterprise-software, #funding, #fundings-exits, #jira, #massachusetts, #private-equity, #saas, #secondaries, #ta-associates, #tc

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InBalance Research forecasts demand for energy suppliers to ensure they optimize distribution

From distributed homes in Cambridge, Mass. and Cambridge, England, inBalance Research is joining Y Combinator as it looks to accelerate its business as the oracle for independent energy providers, utilities, and market makers.

Selling a service it calls Delphi, the very early stage startup is hoping to provide analysis for power producers and utilities on the demand forecasts of energy markets.

The orchestration of energy load across the grid has become a more pressing issue for utilities around the country after witnessing the disastrous collapse of Texas’ power grid in response to its second “once-in-a-century” storm in the last decade.

 

“If we want to address the solution longterm, it’s a two part solution,” said inBalance co-founder and chief executive, Thomas Marge. “It’s a combination of hardware and software. You need the right assets online and you need the right software that can ensure that markets operate when there are extreme market shocks.”

Prices for electricity change every 15 minutes, and sometimes those pries can fluctuate wildly. In some places, even without the weather conditions that demolished the Texas grid and drove some companies out of business, prices can double in a matter of hours, according to inBalance.

That’s what makes forecasting tools important, the company said. As prices spike, asset managers of finite responsive resources such as hydro and storage need to decide if they will offer more value to the market now or later. Coming online too early or too late will decrease the revenue for their clean generation and increase peak prices for consumers.

The situation is even worse, according to the company, if storage and intermittent renewables come online at the same time. That can create downward price pressure for both the storage and renewable assets, which, in turn, can lead to increased fossil fuel generation later the same day, once cleaner sources are depleted.

The software to predict those pressures is what inBalance claims to provide. Marge and his fellow co-founders, Rajan Troll and Edwin Fennell have always been interested in the problems associated with big data and energy.

For Marge, that began when he worked on a project to optimize operations for wind farms during a stint in Lexington, Mass.

“Fundamentally we’re a data science solution,” said Marge. “It’s a combination of knowing what factors influence every single asset on every single market in North America. We have a glimpse into how those assets are going to be working one day before to one hour before in order to do price forecasting.” 

So far, one utility using the company’s software in the Northeast has managed to curb its emissions by 0.2%. With a focus on renewables, inBalance is hoping to roll out larger reductions to the 3,000 market participants that are also using its forecasting tools for other services. Another application is in the work inBalance is conducting with a gas peaker plant to help offset the intermittency of renewable generation sources.

The reduction in emissions in New England is particularly impressive given that the company only began working with the utility there in December. Given its forecasting tools, the company is able to provide a window into which assets might be most valuable at what time — including, potentially, natural gas peaking plants, hydropower, pumped hydropower (basically an energy storage technology), battery or flywheel energy storage projects and demand response technologies that encourage businesses and consumers to reduce consumption in response to price signals, Marge said.

Already, six companies have taken a trip to see the Delphi software and come away as early users. They include a global renewable asset manager and one of the top ten largest utilities in the U.S., according to Marge.

“We use machine learning to accurately forecast electricity prices from terabytes of public and proprietary data. The solution required for daily power system stability is both hardware—like storage and electric vehicle charging—and the software required to optimally use it. inBalance exists to be that software solution,” the company said in a statement. 

 

#articles, #cambridge, #delphi, #early-stage-startup, #energy, #energy-storage, #machine-learning, #massachusetts, #natural-gas, #north-america, #renewable-energy, #smart-grid, #tc, #texas, #united-kingdom, #united-states, #y-combinator

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Book Review: ‘Terror to the Wicked,’ by Tobey Pearl

Tobey Pearl’s “Terror to the Wicked” describes a 1638 trial in which three colonists were convicted and executed for murdering a Native American.

#books-and-literature, #jury-system, #massachusetts, #native-americans, #pearl-tobey, #pilgrims-plymouth-mass, #terror-to-the-wicked-americas-first-trial-by-jury-that-ended-a-war-and-helped-to-form-a-nation-book

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Images of Slaves Are Property of Harvard, Not a Descendant, Judge Rules

The woman who says the enslaved people are her ancestors plans to appeal the decision “about the patriarch of a family, a subject of bedtime stories.”

#decisions-and-verdicts, #harvard-university, #lanier-tamara, #massachusetts, #photography, #slavery-historical, #suits-and-litigation-civil

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How One State Managed to Actually Write Rules on Facial Recognition

Massachusetts is one of the first states to put legislative guardrails around the use of facial recognition technology in criminal investigations.

#aclu-of-massachusetts, #boston-mass, #clearview-ai-inc, #discrimination, #facial-recognition-software, #kade-crockford, #law-and-legislation, #massachusetts, #police, #politics-and-government, #privacy, #race-and-ethnicity, #racial-profiling, #search-and-seizure

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Desperately Seeking Septuagenarian: Vaccine Buddy System Sets Off Old Rush

Massachusetts allows caregivers to be vaccinated if they accompany residents who are 75 and older. This has given rise to an online market for mature companions.

#baker-charles-d-jr, #massachusetts, #vaccination-and-immunization

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New York’s David Energy has raised $4.1 million to ‘build the Standard Oil of renewable energy’

“We intend to build the Standard Oil of renewable energy,” said James McGinniss, the co-founder and chief executive of David Energy, in a statement announcing the company’s new $19 million seed round of debt and equity funding. 

McGinniss’ company is aiming to boost renewable energy adoption and slash energy usage in the built environment by creating a service that operates on both sides of the energy marketplace.

The company combines energy management services for commercial buildings through the software it has developed with the ability to sell energy directly to customers in an effort to reduce the energy consumption and the attendant carbon footprint of the built environment.

The company’s software, Mycor, leverages building demand data and the assets that the building has at its disposal to shift user energy consumption to the times when renewable power is most available, and cheapest. 

It’s a novel approach to an old idea of creating environmental benefits by reducing energy consumption. Using its technology, David Energy tracks both the market price of energy and the energy usage by the buildings it manages. The company sells energy to customers at a fixed price and then uses its windows into energy markets and energy demand to make money off of the difference in power pricing.

That’s why the company needed to raise $15 million in a monthly revolving credit facility from Hartree Partners. So it could pay for the power its customers have bought upfront.

Image Credit: Getty Images

There are a number of tailwinds supporting the growth of a business like David Energy right now. Given the massive amounts of money that are being earmarked for energy conservation and energy efficiency upgrades, companies like David, which promise to manage energy consumption to reduce demand, are going to be huge beneficiaries.

“Looking at the macro shift and the attention being paid to things like battery storage and micro grids we do feel like we’re launching this at the perfect time,” said McGinniss. “We’re offering [customers] market rates and then rebating the savings back to them. They’re getting the software with a market energy supply contract and they are getting the savings back. It’s is bringing that whole bundled package together really brings it all together.”

In addition to the credit facility, the company also raised $4.1 million in venture financing from investors led by Equal Ventures and including Operator Partners, Box Group, Greycroft, Sandeep Jain and Xuan Yong of RigUp, returning angel investor Kiran Bhatraju of Arcadia, and Jason Jacobs’ recently launched My Climate Journey Collective, an early-stage climate tech fund. 

“Renewable energy generators are fundamentally different in their variable, distributed, and digitally-native nature compared to their fossil fuel predecessors while customer loads like heating and driving are shifting to electricity consumption from gas. The sands of market power are shifting and incumbents are poorly-positioned to adapt to evolving customer needs, so there’s a massive opportunity for us to capitalize.” 

Founded by McGinniss, Brian Maxwell and Ahmed Salman, David Energy raised $1.5 million in pre-seed financing back in March 2020.

As the company expands, its relationship with Hartree, an energy and commodities trading desk, will become even more important. As the startup noted, Hartree is the gateway that David needs to transact with energy markets. The trader provides a balance sheet for working capital to purchase energy on behalf of David’s customers.

 

“Renewables are causing fundamental shifts in energy markets, and new models and tools need to emerge,” said Dinkar Bhatia, Co-Head of North American Power at Hartree Partners. “James and the team have identified a significant opportunity in the market and have the right strategy to execute. Hartree is excited to be a commodity partner with David Energy on the launch of the new smart retail platform and is looking forward to helping make DE Supply the premier retailer in the market.”

David now has retail electricity licenses in New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts and is looking to expand around the country.

“David energy stands to reinvent the way that hundreds of billions of dollars a year in energy are consumed,” said Equal Ventures investor Rick Zullo. “Business model creativity and finding ways to change user behavior with new models is just as important if not more important than the technology innovation itself.”

Zullo said his firm pitched David Energy on leading the round after years of looking for a commercial renewable energy startup. The core insight was finding a service that could appeal not to the new construction that already is working with top-of-the-line energy management systems, but with the millions of square feet that aren’t adopting the latest and greatest energy management systems.

“Finding something that will go and bring this to the mass market was something we had been on the hunt for really since the inception of Equal Ventures,” said Zullo.

The innovation that made David attractive was the business model. “There is a landscape of hundreds of dead companies,” Zullo said. “What they did was find a way to subsidize the service. They give away at low or no cost and move that in with line items. The partnership with Partree gives them the opportunity to be the cheapest and also the best for you and the highest margin regional energy provider in the market.”

#articles, #box-group, #energy, #energy-conservation, #energy-consumption, #energy-efficiency, #energy-industry, #energy-management, #equal-ventures, #greycroft, #logistics, #massachusetts, #new-jersey, #new-york, #operator-partners, #partner, #premier, #renewable-energy, #rick-zullo, #tc, #trader

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Folx Health raises $25 million for virtual clinical offerings and care for the LGBTQIA+ community

Folx Health is leveraging the explosion of virtual care services to offer greater access to healthcare focused on the needs of the LGBTQIA+ community, and has raised $25 million in new funding to help it grow.

It’s part of a revolution in care that’s targeting the needs of specific communities with access to physicians that understand those needs. And it’s all made possible by virtual interactions.

“We have a good sense of the nature of the need and the depth of the pain in the community,” said A.G. Breitenstein, the founder and chief executive of Folx Health. “As a non-binary lesbian and healthcare industry veteran, I have seen and experienced firsthand just how broken the current system is for the queer and trans community,”

Breitenstein said Folx would be using the cash to try and expand to all fifty states and increase the available products and services the healthcare company would look to make available to the queer and trans community.

“Whether it’s HRT, PrEP, sexual health or family creation, health care is essential for us to be who we are. It’s about time we build a platform for ourselves, so Queer and Trans people feel seen, heard, and celebrated,” she said in a statement. 

That was one reason why Bessemer Venture Partners leapt at the chance to lead the new financing round for Folx, according to Morgan Cheatham, an investor out of Bessemer’s New York office. The other was the size of the market.

“At a high level, 2% of the population identify as transgender,” said Cheatham. “At that math, when we looked at that, we were able to see a multibillion dollar market opportunity not just to provide [hormone replacement therapy], but to provide a healthcare destination for this community.”

Telescoping out to the opportunity to provide care to the LGBTQ community broadly, when that population represents about 10% to 20% of the population is a “deca-billion opportunity,” said Cheatham.

Breitenstein envisions offering family planning services, broad primary care, and sexual health and wellness care in addition to the hormone therapies that the company currently offers.

Folx joins a cohort of companies tackling health issues specifically for the LGBTQIA+ community which include the mental healthcare service, Violet; Included Health, an employee benefit service; and Plume, which focuses on care for the transgender community.

“We believed in the vision and the approach that she’s taking. She’s building a healthcare experience that is celebratory and dignified rather than one that pathologizing healthcare,” said Cheatham. 

For Bessemer and Cheatham, the investment speaks to broader opportunities to identify specific populations that need care tailored to their specific experience. That includes companies like Spora Health and Live Chair Health, which focus on providing healthcare specifically to people of color.

“Our individual identities whether it be socioeconomic status, race, gender… All of these things inform how we interface with the medical industrial complex,” Cheatham said.

Previous investors Define Ventures and Polaris Venture Partners will also participate in the round, which follows quickly on the heels of Folx’s launch from stealth in December 2020. 

For its patients, Folx Health is offering Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT: testosterone or estrogen) with monthly plans starting at $59 a month. Folx Health will also begin releasing its sexual health and wellness offerings starting with Erectile Dysfunction (ED) treatment, soon to be followed by at-home STI Testing and Treatment, all customized for the specifics of Queer and Trans bodies, the company said. 

The services will include unlimited on-demand clinical support with at-home lab testing (for most plans) and home-delivered medications (costs may vary based on medication). The company’s services are now available in California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Massachusetts, North Carolina, New York, Texas, Virginia, and Washington.

The company is also launching a Folx Library, which will serve as a content hub and resource for Queer and Trans health, written by Folx clinicians and its broader community.

“Our partnership with Folx is a historical moment. It’s challenging to articulate how transformative Folx is for our community. We do so mindful of the brilliant and brave Queer and Trans people who fought for this moment to happen,” said Cheatham in a statement.

#california, #connecticut, #define-ventures, #delaware, #erectile-dysfunction, #florida, #healthcare, #healthcare-industry, #illinois, #massachusetts, #new-york, #north-carolina, #polaris-venture-partners, #spora-health, #tc, #texas, #virginia, #washington

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A Winter Storm Is Set to Wallop the Northeast: What We Know

A nor’easter is expected to stall off the coast of New Jersey and may drop more than two inches of snow an hour in some parts of the region, the National Weather Service said.

#boston-mass, #central-park-manhattan-ny, #connecticut, #east-coast-us, #massachusetts, #national-weather-service, #new-jersey, #new-york-city, #new-york-state, #northeastern-states-us, #rhode-island, #snow-and-snowstorms

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Instagram Showcases ‘Cheap Old Houses’

Instagram and fans of painstaking renovations have given new life to homes with some history, especially if they’re affordable.

#connecticut, #hgtv, #historic-buildings-and-sites, #home-repairs-and-improvements, #maine, #massachusetts, #quarantine-life-and-culture, #real-estate-and-housing-residential, #social-media

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State reps try to ban Comcast data cap and price hikes until pandemic is over

Illustration of a water hose with Internet data trickling out of it, represented by 1s and 0s.

Enlarge (credit: Aurich Lawson / Getty Images)

In response to Comcast imposing a data cap on Massachusetts residents, state lawmakers have proposed a ban on data caps, new fees, and price increases on home-Internet services for the duration of the pandemic.

The legislation was filed on Tuesday this week by Democratic state representatives Andy Vargas and Dave Rogers. Vargas called the bill a “response to Comcast Internet data cap plans,” while Rogers said the goal is “to push back at Comcast and any other service providers who try to raise prices or fees during a pandemic.” Verizon FiOS and RCN also provide Internet service in Massachusetts but do not impose data caps.

Vargas and Rogers previously led a group of 71 Massachusetts lawmakers who urged Comcast to halt enforcement of its 1.2TB monthly data cap, arguing that the cap hurts low-income people and is unnecessary because of Comcast’s robust network capacity. While Comcast already enforced the data cap in 27 states for several years, the cable company brought the cap to the rest of its territory—an additional 12 states including Massachusetts and the District of Columbia—this month. Comcast is easing-in enforcement so that the first overage charges for newly capped customers will be assessed for data usage in the April 2021 billing period.

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#comcast, #data-cap, #massachusetts, #policy

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Lizzie Borden’s Notoriety Is This Home’s Selling Point

The house where her father and stepmother were brutally killed with a hatchet draws thousands of visitors a year. Now it’s for sale.

#borden-lizzie, #fall-river-mass, #massachusetts, #murders-attempted-murders-and-homicides

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Comcast data cap blasted by lawmakers as it expands into 12 more states

The back of a Comcast van driving along a street in Sunnyvale, California.

Enlarge / A Comcast van in Sunnyvale, California, in November 2018. (credit: Getty Images | Andrei Stanescu)

Dozens of state lawmakers from Massachusetts urged Comcast to halt enforcement of its 1.2TB monthly data cap, saying the cap hurts low-income people during the pandemic and is unnecessary because of Comcast’s healthy network capacity.

“Network capacity is not an issue for Comcast or a valid excuse to charge customers more,” 71 state lawmakers wrote in the letter last week, one day before Comcast brought its data cap to Massachusetts and other states where it wasn’t already enforced. “Comcast itself claims it has plenty of capacity across its network, including areas where no caps are currently imposed… It is inconceivable that Comcast would choose to impose this ‘cap and fee’ plan during a pandemic, when many Massachusetts residents are forced to work and attend school from home via the Internet.”

The letter said the lawmakers “strongly urge Comcast to discontinue this plan, and to reconsider any future attempts at imposing a data cap or any perversion of the principles of net neutrality in Massachusetts.” The lawmakers also pointed out a statement by Comcast executive Tony Werner, who said the increased broadband traffic caused by the pandemic “has all been within the capability of the network.”

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#biz-it, #comcast, #data-cap, #massachusetts, #policy

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In Massachusetts, Inmates Will Be Among First to Get Vaccines

As prison outbreaks rise, the state has moved inmates forward in the line to receive inoculations.

#black-people, #chronic-condition-health, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #disease-rates, #elderly, #health-affairs-journal, #massachusetts, #prison-guards-and-corrections-officers, #prison-policy-initiative, #prisons-and-prisoners, #probation-and-parole, #vaccination-and-immunization, #your-feed-science

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Is There Such a Thing as a Humane Eviction?

As a bulge of evictions looms, a Massachusetts sheriff is searching for ways to soften the blow.

#chicopee-mass, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #evictions, #foreclosures, #hampden-county-mass, #homeless-persons, #landlords, #massachusetts, #renting-and-leasing-real-estate, #springfield-mass, #unemployment

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Decrypted: Google finds a devastating iPhone security flaw, FireEye hack sends alarm bells ringing

In case you missed it: A ransomware attack saw patient data stolen from one of the largest U.S. fertility networks; the Supreme Court began hearing a case that may change how millions of Americans use computers and the internet; and lawmakers in Massachusetts have voted to ban police from using facial recognition across the state.

In this week’s Decrypted, we’re deep-diving into two stories beyond the headlines, including why the breach at cybersecurity giant FireEye has the cybersecurity industry in shock.


THE BIG PICTURE

Google researcher finds a major iPhone security bug, now fixed

What happens when you leave one of the best security researchers alone for six months? You get one of the most devastating vulnerabilities ever found in an iPhone — a bug so damaging that it can be exploited over-the-air and requires no interaction on the user’s part.

The AWDL bug under attack using a proof-of-concept exploit developed by a Google researcher. Image Credits: Ian Beer/Google Project Zero

The vulnerability was found in Apple Wireless Direct Link (AWDL), an important part of the iPhone’s software that among other things allows users to share files and photos over Wi-Fi through Apple’s AirDrop feature.

“AWDL is enabled by default, exposing a large and complex attack surface to everyone in radio proximity,” wrote Google’s Ian Beer in a tweet, who found the vulnerability in November and disclosed it to Apple, which pushed out a fix for iPhones and Macs in January.

But exploiting the bug allowed Beer to gain access to the underlying iPhone software using Wi-Fi to gain control of a vulnerable device — including the messages, emails and photos — as well as the camera and microphone — without alerting the user. Beer said that the bug could be exploited over “hundreds of meters or more,” depending on the hardware used to carry out the attack. But the good news is that there’s no evidence that malicious hackers have actively tried to exploit the bug.

News of the bug drew immediate attention, though Apple didn’t comment. NSA’s Rob Joyce said the bug find is “quite an accomplishment,” given that most iOS bugs require chaining multiple vulnerabilities together in order to get access to the underlying software.

FireEye hacked by a nation-state, but the aftermath is unclear

#apple, #articles, #computer-security, #cyberattacks, #cyberwarfare, #decrypted, #dragos, #fireeye, #google, #government, #infrastructure, #iphone, #massachusetts, #national-security-agency, #online-platforms, #orca-security, #president, #ransomware, #ron-wyden, #security, #series-b, #supreme-court, #the-washington-post, #trump, #u-s-government, #white-house, #wi-fi

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Massachusetts governor won’t sign police reform bill with facial recognition ban

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker has returned a police reform bill back to the state legislature, asking lawmakers to strike out several provisions — including one for a statewide ban on police and public authorities using facial recognition technology, the first of its kind in the United States.

The bill, which also banned police from using rubber bullets and tear gas, was passed on December 1 by both the state’s House and Senate after senior lawmakers overcame months of deadlock to reach a consensus. Lawmakers brought the bill to the state legislature in the wake of the killing of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man who was killed by a white Minneapolis police officer, later charged with his murder.

Baker said in a letter to lawmakers that he objected to the ban, saying the use of facial recognition helped to convict several criminals, including a child sex offender and a double murderer.

In an interview with The Boston Globe, Baker said that he’s “not going to sign something that is going to ban facial recognition.”

Under the bill, police and public agencies across the state would be prohibited from using facial recognition, with a single exception to run facial recognition searches against the state’s driver license database with a warrant. The state would be required to publish annual transparency figures on the number of searches made by officers going forward.

The Massachusetts House voted to pass by 92-67, and the Senate voted 28-12 — neither of which were veto-proof majorities.

The Boston Globe said that Baker did not outright say he would veto the bill. After the legislature hands a revised (or the same) version of the bill back to the governor, it’s up to Baker to sign it, veto it, or — under Massachusetts law, he could allow it to become law without his signature by waiting 10 days.

“Unchecked police use of surveillance technology also harms everyone’s rights to anonymity, privacy, and free speech. We urge the legislature to reject Governor Baker’s amendment and to ensure passage of commonsense regulations of government use of face surveillance,” said Carol Rose, executive director of the ACLU of Massachusetts.

A spokesperson for Baker’s office did not immediately return a request for comment.

#driver, #facial-recognition, #george-floyd, #government, #governor, #learning, #massachusetts, #officer, #security, #senate, #spokesperson, #surveillance, #video-surveillance

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Nor’easter Knocks Out Power to More Than 200,000 in New England

More than 110,000 customers in Maine alone lost electricity after a nor’easter brought high winds and heavy snow.

#connecticut, #maine, #massachusetts, #new-england-states-us, #new-hampshire, #noreaster, #power-failures-and-blackouts, #snow-and-snowstorms, #weather, #wind

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Floww raises $6.7M for its data-driven marketplace matching founders with investors, based on merit

Floww – a data-driven marketplace designed to allow founders to pitch investors, with the whole investment relationship managed online – says it has raised $6.7M / £5M to date in Seed funding from angels and family offices. Investors include Ramon Mendes De Leon, Duncan Simpson Craib, Angus Davidson, Stephane Delacote and Pip Baker (Google’s Head of Fintech UK) and multiple Family Offices. The cash will be used to build out the platform designed to give startups access to over 500+ VCs, accelerators and angel networks.

The team consists of Martijn De Wever, founder and CEO of London based VC Force Over Mass; Lee Fasciani, cofounder of Territory Projects (the firm behind film graphics and design including Guardians of the Galaxy and BladeRunner 2049); and CTO Alex Pilsworth, of various Fintech startups.

Having made over 160 investments himself, De Wever says he recognized the need for a platform connecting investors and startups based on merit, clean data, and transparency, rather than a system built on “warm introductions” which can have inherent cultural and even racial biases.

Floww’s idea is that it showcases startups based on merit only, allowing founders to raise capital by providing investors with data and transparency. Startups are given a suite of tools and materials to get started, from cap table templates to ‘How To’ guides. Founders can then ‘drag and drop’ their investor documents in any format. Floww’s team of accountants then cross-checks the data for errors and process key performance metrics. A startup’s digital profile includes dynamic charts and tables, allowing prospective investors to see the company’s business potential.

Floww charges a monthly fee to VCs, accelerators, family offices and PE firms. Startups have free access to the platform, and a premium model to contact and send their deal to multiple VCs.

Floww’s pitch is that VCs can, in turn, manage deal-sourcing, CRM, as well as reporting to their investors and LPs. Quite a claim, given all VCs to-date handle this kind of thing in-house. However, Floww claims to have processed 3,000 startups and says it is rolling out to over 500 VC’s.

In a statement, De Wever said: “In an age of virtual meetings and connections, the need for coffee meetings on Sand Hill Road or Mayfair is gone. What we need now are global connections, allowing VCs to engage in merit-based investing using data and metrics.” He says the era of the Coronavirus pandemic means many deals will have to be sourced remotely now, so “the time for a platform like this is now.”

AngelList is perhaps its closest competitor from the startup perspective. And the VC application incorporates the kind of functionality seen in Affinity, Airtable, Efront and Docsend. But AngeList doesn’t provide data or metrics.

#angellist, #business, #ceo, #cofounder, #companies, #crm, #cto, #entrepreneurship, #europe, #head, #london, #martijn-de-wever, #massachusetts, #private-equity, #startup-company, #tc

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Why Are States Imposing Coronavirus Curfews?

State and city leaders are trying to slow the spread of the coronavirus without full lockdowns. But whether curfews will help remains unclear.

#bars-and-nightclubs, #colorado, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #coronavirus-risks-and-safety-concerns, #curfews, #massachusetts, #new-york-state, #ohio, #pueblo-colo, #restaurants, #shutdowns-institutional

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108 Convictions Tied to Massachusetts Chemist’s Misconduct May Be Vacated

The Suffolk County district attorney said she was seeking to remove the “huge stain on the legal system” left by Annie Dookhan, who pleaded guilty in 2013 to tampering with evidence.

#boston-mass, #decisions-and-verdicts, #dookhan-annie, #drug-abuse-and-traffic, #ethics-and-official-misconduct, #forensic-science, #massachusetts, #suits-and-litigation-civil

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Earthquake Rattles Parts of Massachusetts and Rhode Island

The quake, which had a preliminary magnitude of 4.0, was also felt in the Long Island Sound, the United States Geological Survey said.

#connecticut, #earthquakes, #geology, #long-island-sound, #massachusetts, #rhode-island

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For a Trump Fan, a Week When Victory Ebbed Away

Nick Rocco, a passionate Trump follower in the Democratic bastion of Massachusetts, slowly realized it wasn’t going his way.

#biden-joseph-r-jr, #demonstrations-protests-and-riots, #massachusetts, #presidential-election-of-2020, #trump-donald-j

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Connected cars must be open to third parties, say Massachusetts voters

A man operates a notebook computer over the open engine of a car.

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images / Aurich Lawson)

On Tuesday, voters in Massachusetts chose, by an overwhelming majority, to extend the state’s automotive “right to repair” law to cover connected-car platforms and telematics services. As a result, the state will require that from 2022, all new telematics-equipped vehicles be accessible via a standardized open-data platform that allows owners and third-party repair shops to access vehicle data from mobile devices.

Massachusetts’ automotive “right to repair” law was the first in the nation when originally passed in 2013. The aim was to fight the growing problem of automakers restricting their proprietary diagnostics tools to anyone other than official franchised dealer networks. When the law came into effect in 2018, it required that every vehicle sold in the state has a “non-proprietary vehicle interface device” for accessing mechanical data.

But the automotive industry is rapidly going wireless when it comes to getting data out of cars. Almost every new car sold in the United States in 2020 is fitted with an onboard cellular modem, and every OEM has invested in cloud infrastructure, promising benefits like vehicles that know when to ask for preventative maintenance servicing. Those cloud platforms have been guarded by the automakers, some of whom smell dollars in all that data.

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#cars, #connected-cars, #massachusetts, #policy, #right-to-repair, #telematics

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When Trick-or-Treating Is Scary, for Real

Some New Yorkers are trying to find a way to celebrate Halloween despite concerns about the spread of the coronavirus.

#bronx-nyc, #brooklyn-nyc, #centers-for-disease-control-and-prevention, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #costumes, #crown-heights-brooklyn-ny, #de-blasio-bill, #halloween, #harlem-manhattan-ny, #holidays-and-special-occasions, #manhattan-nyc, #massachusetts, #new-york-city, #parades, #parties-social, #quarantine-life-and-culture, #texas

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The DOJ investigating Visa’s $5.3 billion bid for Plaid on antitrust grounds

It’s not just big tech that’s getting the antitrust treatment from the Department of Justice.

Late Monday afternoon, the Department of Justice tipped its hand that it was investigating Visa’s proposed $5.3 billion acquisition of the venture-backed Plaid, which allows applications to connect with a users’ bank account.

It’s a tool that powers a good chunk of the new fintech offerings from a whole slew of products and the Justice Department has apparently spent the past year looking into how the deal would effect the broader market for new financial services offerings coming from a number of tech startups.

The revelation that the DOJ was taking a closer look at the Plaid acquisition came from a petition filed in the U.S. Court for the District of Massachusetts to compel Bain & Co., the consulting firm that worked on Visa’s bid for Plaid, to comply with the agency’s civil investigative demand.

The DOJ is alleging that Bain has withheld documents demanded under the CID by asserting that it had some privilege over the documents — effectively stalling the DOJ’s investigation.

“American consumers rely on the Antitrust Division to investigate mergers promptly and thoroughly,”  said Assistant Attorney for the Antitrust Division Makan Delrahim, in a statement.  “Collecting relevant third-party documents and data is essential to the division’s ability to analyze these transactions.  Too often, third parties seek to flout these requirements, hoping the division will lose interest and focus its enforcement efforts elsewhere.”

DOJ first asked Bain for documents related to Visa’s pricing strategy and competition against other debit card networks in June. The feds intended to use that information to analyze the effects of Visa’s attempted acquisition on the broader financial services market. Bain refused to produce the documents by claiming that the information was privileged.

Visa’s bid for Plaid isn’t the only big fintech acquisition that’s in the DOJ’s sights, according to a report in The Wall Street Journal. Federal regulators are also looking at MasterCard’s $1 billion bid for the fintech startup Finicity, and Intuit’s $7 billion pitch to acquire the credit advisory and lending marketplace, Credit Karma Inc.

“The division’s petition against Bain is aimed at securing relevant documents and making clear that the division will hold third parties to the deadlines and specifications in the CIDs we issue,” Delrahim said. “Third parties, like Bain, must comply fully and expeditiously with our civil investigative demands and provide the documents and data we need to discharge our duties and serve the American people.”

#att, #bain-co, #companies, #credit-cards, #department-of-justice, #finance, #intuit, #massachusetts, #mastercard, #merchant-services, #payment-cards, #plaid, #tc, #the-wall-street-journal, #visa

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Facebook steps into cloud gaming — and another feud with Apple

Facebook will soon be the latest tech giant to enter the world of cloud gaming. Their approach is different than what Microsoft or Google has built but Facebook highlights a shared central challenge: dealing with Apple.

Facebook is not building a console gaming competitor to compete with Stadia or xCloud, instead the focus is wholly on mobile games. Why cloud stream mobile games that your device is already capable of running locally? Facebook is aiming to get users into games more quickly and put less friction between a user seeing an advertisement for a game and actually playing it themselves. Users can quickly tap into the title without downloading anything and if they eventually opt to download the title from a mobile app store, they’ll be able to pick up where they left off.

Facebook’s service will launch on the desktop web and Android, but not iOS due to what Facebook frames as usability restrictions outlined in Apple’s App Store terms and conditions.

With the new platform, users will  be able to start playing mobile games directly from Facebook ads. Image via Facebook.

While Apple has suffered an onslaught of criticism in 2020 from developers of major apps like Spotify, Tinder and Fortnite for how much money they take as a cut from revenues of apps downloaded from the App Store, the plights of companies aiming to build cloud gaming platforms have been more nuanced and are tied to how those platforms are fundamentally allowed to operate on Apple devices.

Apple was initially slow to provide a path forward for cloud gaming apps from Google and Microsoft, which had previously been outlawed on the App Store. The iPhone maker recently updated its policies to allow these apps to exist, but in a more convoluted capacity than the platform makers had hoped, forcing them to first send users to the App Store before being able to cloud stream a gaming title on their platform.

For a user downloading a lengthy single-player console epic, the short pitstop is an inconvenience, but long-time Facebook gaming exec Jason Rubin says that the stipulations are a non-starter for what Facebook’s platform envisions, a way to start playing mobile games immediately without downloading anything.

“It’s a sequence of hurdles that altogether make a bad consumer experience,” Rubin tells TechCrunch.

Apple tells TechCrunch that they have continued to engage with Facebook on bringing its gaming efforts under its guidelines and that platforms can reach iOS by either submitting each individual game to the App Store for review or operating their service on Safari.

In terms of building the new platform onto the mobile web, Rubin says that without being able to point users of their iOS app to browser-based experiences, as current rules forbid, Facebook doesn’t see pushing its billions of users to accessing the service primarily from a browser as a reasonable alternative. In a Zoom call, Rubin demoes how this  could operate on iOS, with users tapping an advertisement inside the app and being redirected to a game experience in mobile Safari.

“But if I click on that, I can’t go to the web. Apple says, ‘No, no, no, no, no, you can’t do that,’ Rubin tells us. “Apple may say that it’s a free and open web, but what you can actually build on that web is dictated by what they decide to put in their core functionality.”

Facebook VP of Play Jason Rubin. Image via Facebook.

Rubin, who co-founded the game development studio Naughty Dog in 1994 before it was acquired by Sony in 2001, has been at Facebook since he joined Oculus months after its 2014 acquisition was announced. Rubin had previously been tasked with managing the games ecosystem for its virtual reality headsets, this year he was put in charge of the company’s gaming initiatives across their core family of apps as the company’s VP of Play.

Rubin, well familiar with game developer/platform skirmishes, was quick to distinguish the bone Facebook had to pick with Apple and complaints from those like Epic Games which sued Apple this summer.

“I do want to put a pin in the fact that we’re giving Google 30% [on Android]. The Apple issue is not about money,” Rubin tells TechCrunch. “We can talk about whether or not it’s fair that Google takes that 30%. But we would be willing to give Apple the 30% right now, if they would just let consumers have the opportunity to do what we’re offering here.”

Facebook is notably also taking a 30% cut of transaction within these games, even as Facebook’s executive team has taken its own shots at Apple’s steep revenue fee in the past, most recently criticizing how Apple’s App Store model was hurting small businesses during the pandemic. This saga eventually led to Apple announcing that it would withhold its cut through the end of the year for ticket sales of small businesses hosting online events.

Apple’s reticence to allow major gaming platforms a path towards independently serving up games to consumers underscores the significant portion of App Store revenues that could be eliminated by a consumer shift towards these cloud platforms. Apple earned around $50 billion from the App Store last year, CNBC estimates, and gaming has long been their most profitable vertical.

Though Facebook is framing this as an uphill battle against a major platform for the good of the gamer, this is hardly a battle between two underdogs. Facebook pulled in nearly $70 billion in ad revenues last year and improving their offerings for mobile game studios could be a meaningful step towards increasing that number, something Apple’s App Store rules threaten.

For the time being, Facebook is keeping this launch pretty conservative. There are just 5-10 titles that are going to be available at launch, Rubin says. Facebook is rolling out access to the new service, which is free, this week across a handful of states in America, including California, Texas, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Delaware, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Washington, D.C., Virginia and West Virginia. The hodge-podge nature of the geographic rollout is owed to the technical limitations of cloud-gaming– people have to be close to data centers where the service has rolled out in order to have a usable experience. Facebook is aiming to scale to the rest of the U.S. in the coming months, they say.

#america, #android, #app-store, #california, #cloud-gaming, #computing, #connecticut, #delaware, #epic-games, #executive, #facebook, #google, #iphone, #jason-rubin, #maryland, #massachusetts, #microsoft, #mobile-app, #mobile-game, #new-jersey, #new-york, #operating-systems, #pennsylvania, #rhode-island, #software, #sony, #spotify, #tc, #texas, #tinder, #united-states, #virginia, #virtual-reality, #vp, #washington-d-c, #web-browser, #xcloud

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To Recognize Misinformation in Media, Teach a Generation While It’s Young

There is no silver bullet to slay internet lies and fictions. But students can be taught to know when information is reliable.

#atlanta-ga, #australia, #boston-mass, #censorship, #clark-katherine-m, #computers-and-the-internet, #connecticut, #e-learning, #education-k-12, #europe, #far-east-south-and-southeast-asia-and-pacific-areas, #illiteracy, #kim-jong-un, #klobuchar-amy, #law-and-legislation, #lobbying-and-lobbyists, #massachusetts, #news-and-news-media, #reading-and-writing-skills-education, #rumors-and-misinformation, #russia, #social-media, #united-states

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In Fights Over Face Masks, Echoes of the American Seatbelt Wars

Seatbelt laws were a hard sell in state capitals as opponents argued they were uncomfortable or an imposition on personal liberty. Sound familiar?

#coronavirus-risks-and-safety-concerns, #law-and-legislation, #massachusetts, #michigan, #national-highway-traffic-safety-administration, #new-hampshire, #politics-and-government, #seatbelts, #states-us

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Massachusetts Town Begs Residents to Stop Calling About Fish

Some in Wareham, Mass., worried the enormous, blob-like fish was stranded. Others thought it was a shark. It turned out to be a sunfish, and town officials urged residents to stop reporting it.

#boston-harbor-mass, #cape-cod-mass, #fish-and-other-marine-life, #massachusetts, #sunfish

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Is This Still Soccer?

In Massachusetts, rule changes brought on by the pandemic — no contact, no tackles, no headers, no throw-ins — are forcing soccer players and coaches to adapt to a very different game.

#interscholastic-athletics, #massachusetts, #officiating-sports, #soccer

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In a First, New England Journal of Medicine Joins Never-Trumpers

Editors at the world’s leading medical journal said the Trump administration “took a crisis and turned it into a tragedy.”

#academic-and-scientific-journals, #biden-joseph-r-jr, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #deaths-fatalities, #endorsements, #ethics-and-official-misconduct, #massachusetts, #new-england-journal-of-medicine, #politics-and-government, #rumors-and-misinformation, #scientific-american, #trump-donald-j, #united-states, #your-feed-science

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New England’s Forests Are Sick. They Need More Tree Doctors.

Climate change is taking a toll on woodlands in the Northeast.

#berkshires-mass, #drought, #environment, #forests-and-forestry, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #invasive-species, #land-use-policies, #massachusetts, #new-england-states-us, #wildfires

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She’s 13, and the Source of a Family’s Covid-19 Outbreak

The C.D.C. and four state health departments described how one girl spread the coronavirus to 11 relatives during a gathering.

#centers-for-disease-control-and-prevention, #children-and-childhood, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #georgia, #illinois, #massachusetts, #morbidity-and-mortality-weekly-report, #research, #rhode-island, #teenagers-and-adolescence, #your-feed-health, #your-feed-science

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Holyoke Soldiers’ Home: Two Charged Over Covid-19 Deaths

The former leaders of the state-run Holyoke Soldiers’ Home in Massachusetts were indicted by a state grand jury on abuse and neglect charges related to their work there.

#clinton-david-1949, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #deaths-fatalities, #elder-abuse, #elder-care, #healey-maura-1971, #holyoke-mass, #holyoke-soldiershome-holyoke-mass, #massachusetts, #walsh-bennett

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Sorry, Kids. Snow Days Are Probably Over.

Schools, forced to cancel in-person classes because of the pandemic, have become more comfortable with remote teaching. That might mean the end of the snow day.

#anxiety-and-stress, #boston-mass, #computers-and-the-internet, #hurricanes-and-tropical-storms, #maryland, #massachusetts, #minnesota, #new-hampshire, #parenting, #pennsylvania, #quarantine-life-and-culture, #snow-and-snowstorms

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