Andy Weir’s New Space Odyssey

A new novel from “The Martian” author is slightly more out there, but it still has plenty of particle physics.

#books-and-literature, #content-type-personal-profile, #neutrinos, #project-hail-mary-a-novel-book, #science-and-technology, #science-fiction, #space-and-astronomy, #stars-and-galaxies, #the-martian-book, #weir-andy-1972, #writing-and-writers

Hunting Ghost Particles Beneath the World’s Deepest Lake

A neutrino-spotting telescope beneath Russia’s frozen Lake Baikal in Russia is close to delivering scientific results after four decades of setbacks.

#domogatski-grigori-v, #ice, #lake-baikal-russia, #neutrinos, #physics, #research, #russia, #siberia, #space-and-astronomy, #stars-and-galaxies, #telescopes-and-observatories

Jack Steinberger, Nobel Winner in Physics, Dies at 99

Dr. Steinberger shared the prize in 1988 for expanding understanding of the neutrino, a staggeringly ubiquitous subatomic particle.

#deaths-obituaries, #neutrinos, #nobel-prizes, #physics, #steinberger-jack

Masatoshi Koshiba, 94, Dies; Nobel Winner Tracked Ghostly Neutrinos

A physics teacher had flunked him, denigrating his abilities. Dr. Koshiba set out to prove the teacher was wrong.

#deaths-obituaries, #koshiba-masatoshi, #neutrinos, #nobel-prizes, #physics

A Star Went Supernova in 1987. Where Is It Now?

Astronomers might have found the ultradense remnant of an explosion that wracked a nearby galaxy.

#astrophysical-journal, #black-holes-space, #hubble-space-telescope, #neutrinos, #research, #space-and-astronomy, #stars-and-galaxies, #your-feed-science

Could You Make a Snowball of Neutrinos?

You’ll need more than a few — say, 300 decillion. And good luck trying to throw it.

#neutrinos, #physics, #space-and-astronomy, #your-feed-science

Seeking Dark Matter, They Detected Another Mystery

Do signals from beneath an Italian mountain herald a revolution in physics?

#aprile-elena, #dark-matter-astronomy, #gran-sasso-national-laboratory, #grandi-luca, #hydrogen, #italy, #neutrinos, #physics, #research, #space-and-astronomy, #sun, #tritium, #wilczek-frank-a, #xenon-collaboration, #your-feed-science

Neutrinos may help us understand how matter prevailed over antimatter

Image of a small raft floating in a giant tank covered in detectors.

Enlarge / The Super Kamiokonde neutrino detector as it was being filled with water. (credit: Super Kamiokande)

Everything we can see in the Universe is made of matter, and we wouldn’t exist without it. For physicists, this is actually a problem. From the perspective of the physics that describes the behavior of particles, matter and antimatter are equivalent. As far as the Standard Model of particles is concerned, there’s no reason we shouldn’t see equal amounts of matter and antimatter—or, more correctly, just the photons left behind after they meet and annihilate each other.

For there to be the sort of difference between the two that makes our Universe possible, something has to break the apparent symmetry between them (technically termed charge-conjugation and parity-reversal symmetry, or simply CP symmetry). And we have identified some cases of CP symmetry violations; they’re just too small to account for all the matter in the Universe.

Now, nearly a decade of data from the world’s leading neutrino observatory has found an indication that these particles display hints of a CP symmetry violation that’s potentially much larger. While the data doesn’t reach the level where physicists are willing to call it a discovery, it definitely warrants follow-ups as additional detectors come online.

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#antimatter, #leptogenesis, #neutrinos, #particle-physics, #physics, #science

Why the Big Bang Produced Something Rather Than Nothing

How did matter gain the edge over antimatter in the early universe? Maybe, just maybe, neutrinos.

#antimatter, #ichikawa-atsuko-k, #japan, #nature-journal, #neutrinos, #physics, #sanchez-federico, #space-and-astronomy, #stars-and-galaxies, #your-feed-science