Solveig Gold Is Proud to Be the Wife of a ‘Canceled’ Princeton Professor

But she also wants to be known as more. At dinner with the aspiring public intellectual and her “cabal.”

#conservatism-us-politics, #content-type-personal-profile, #gold-solveig, #katz-joshua-t-1969, #princeton-university

Princeton Fires Tenured Professor in Campus Controversy

Joshua Katz’s dismissal is related to his inappropriate conduct with a female student, the university said. He says his criticism of a campus protest group is the issue.

#colleges-and-universities, #freedom-of-speech-and-expression, #katz-joshua-t-1969, #princeton-university

Princeton President Recommends Firing Joshua Katz After Uproar

Joshua Katz says he was targeted because of his criticism of a campus protest group. A university report says the concerns are related to his inappropriate conduct with a female student.

#colleges-and-universities, #eisgruber-christopher-l, #freedom-of-speech-and-expression, #george-floyd-protests-2020, #katz-joshua-t-1969, #princeton-university, #race-and-ethnicity

Sara McLanahan, Who Studied Single Motherhood, Dies at 81

A Princeton sociologist and a single mother herself, she brought her own experience to her wide body of scholarly work.

#deaths-obituaries, #mclanahan-sara-f-1940-2021, #princeton-university, #research, #single-mothers, #sociology, #university-of-wisconsin

New York’s Ban on Evictions Is Expiring. What Happens Now?

The moratorium’s end presents Gov. Kathy Hochul with a potential challenge as she prepares to run for a full term.

#bronx-defenders, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #evictions, #hochul-kathleen-c, #new-york-city, #new-york-state, #princeton-university, #real-estate-and-housing-residential, #rent-stabilization-assn, #renting-and-leasing-real-estate

Dartmouth Beats Brown, Princeton Defeats Penn

The only Division I league to not play football last season because of the pandemic, the Ivy League endured an unusual journey of virus disruptions in its return.

#brown-university, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #dartmouth-college, #football-college, #interscholastic-athletics, #ivy-league, #princeton-university, #teevens-buddy

Divestment Is Pushing Money Away From Fossil Fuels

The divestment campaign has taken much of the shine off what was once the planet’s dominant industry.

#coal, #colleges-and-universities, #endowments, #ford-foundation, #france, #global-warming, #great-britain, #harvard-university, #ireland, #loyola-university-chicago, #manchin-joe-iii, #natural-gas, #oil-petroleum-and-gasoline, #paris-france, #peabody-coal-co, #pensions-and-retirement-plans, #philanthropy, #princeton-university, #quebec-province-canada, #reed-college, #rockefeller-foundation, #roman-catholic-church, #royal-dutch-shell-plc, #states-us, #stocks-and-bonds, #united-nations-framework-convention-on-climate-change, #united-states

What Does a University Owe Democracy?

Academia can still serve the goals of liberty. But first the Coward Culture has to go.

#abbot-dorian, #admissions-standards, #colleges-and-universities, #daniels-ronald-j-1959, #discrimination, #freedom-of-speech-and-expression, #johns-hopkins-university, #massachusetts-institute-of-technology, #princeton-university, #university-of-chicago

Glitch Reveals Ballot Choices of N.Y.C. Voters, Including Mayor’s Son

The Board of Elections inadvertently allowed the mayoral primary votes of 378 New Yorkers to become public, a report found.

#board-of-elections-nyc, #de-blasio-dante, #gracie-mansion-manhattan-ny, #new-york-city, #princeton-university, #ranked-choice-voting, #steel-robert-k, #voting-rights-registration-and-requirements

Robert Hollander, Who Led Readers Into ‘The Inferno,’ Dies at 87

He and his wife wrote an admired translation of Dante’s “Divine Comedy,” and he began an innovative project to digitize centuries of scholarly commentary.

#colleges-and-universities, #dante-alighieri-1265-1321, #deaths-obituaries, #hollander-jean-d-2019, #hollander-robert-b-jr, #poetry-and-poets, #princeton-university, #the-divine-comedy-book, #translation-and-interpreters

What Happens to Philip Roth’s Legacy Now?

His single authorized biography is mired in controversy. Scholars say it shouldn’t be the last word, but they are struggling for access to his vast and in some cases inaccessible private archives.

#archives-and-records, #bailey-blake, #books-and-literature, #content-type-personal-profile, #libraries-and-librarians, #library-of-congress, #manuscripts, #nadel-ira-b, #newark-public-library, #norton-w-wco, #philip-roth-the-biography-book, #princeton-university, #research, #roth-philip, #sexual-harassment, #skyhorse-publishing, #wills-and-estates, #writing-and-writers

The Sunday Read: ‘He Wants to Save Classics From Whiteness. Can the Field Survive?’

Dan-el Padilla Peralta thinks classicists should knock ancient Greece and Rome off their pedestal — even if that means destroying their discipline.

#colleges-and-universities, #discrimination, #education, #new-york-times, #padilla-peralta-dan-el, #princeton-university, #race-and-ethnicity, #the-daily-radio-program

Decades After Police Bombing, Philadelphians ‘Sickened’ by Handling of Victim’s Bones

The disclosure that anthropologists at two Ivy League universities had kept bones from a victim of the 1985 MOVE bombing infuriated its members as well as city leaders.

#black-people, #bones, #forensic-science, #fringe-groups-and-movements, #move, #philadelphia-pa, #police-brutality-misconduct-and-shootings, #princeton-university, #university-of-pennsylvania, #university-of-pennsylvania-museum-of-archaeology-and-anthropology

Raise the Minimum Wage to Prevent Suicide

There is a connection between people’s ability to pay rent each month and their mental health.

#anxiety-and-stress, #bryn-mawr-college, #columbia-university, #income-inequality, #labor-and-jobs, #mental-health-and-disorders, #minimum-wage, #new-york-state-psychiatric-institute, #princeton-university, #suicides-and-suicide-attempts, #unemployment, #wages-and-salaries

Racial disparity in Chicago cops’ use of force laid bare in new data

Analysis of a trove of data extracted from the Chicago Police Department has revealed major differences between how black and white officers, as well as male and female ones, actually enforce the law. This rare apples-to-apples comparison supports the idea that improving diversity in law enforcement may also improve the quality of policing.

Historically hard data from police departments has been extremely hard to come by, for a variety of reasons. As the authors put it in the paper:

Rigorous evaluation of the effects of police diversity has been stymied by a lack of sufficiently fine-grained data on officer deployment and behavior that makes it difficult or impossible to ensure that officers being compared are facing common circumstances while on duty.

…At present, a patchwork of nonstandard record-keeping and disclosure practices across roughly 18,000 U.S. police agencies has severely impeded broader policy evaluation.

This study by B.A. Ba et al., however, is based on highly detailed CPD records resulting from requests made to the department over a period of three years. It’s a collaboration between researchers from UC Irvine, the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, and Columbia, and was published today in Science (access is free).

The records include millions of shifts and patrols from 2012 through 2015, which the team carefully sorted and pruned until it had a set that would allow the kind of analysis they hoped to do: comparing police work that is similar in all respects except the demographics of the officers doing it.

If on a Monday in March, in the same district at the same time of day, no serious differences could be found between Black officers and white officers, then race could be tentatively ruled out as a major contributor to how police do their work. On the other hand, if there were serious differences found, then that might indicate — as a topic for further study — the possibility of systemic bias of some kind.

As you might expect, the analysis found that there are indeed serious differences that, having isolated all the other variables, only correlate with the race of the officer. This may seem obvious to some and controversial to others, but the point of this work is not to assume or confirm assumptions, but to show plainly with data that there are disparities associated with race that need investigation and explanation.

Some of the specific findings can be summarized as follows:

  • Minority officers (black and Hispanic, self-identified) “receive vastly different patrol assignments,” something that had to be controlled for in order to provide effective comparisons for the other findings.
  • Black officers use force 35 percent less than white officers on average, with most of the difference coming from force used against black civilians.
  • Black officers perform far fewer “discretionary stops” for “suspicious behavior.”
  • Hispanic officers showed similar, but smaller reductions.
  • Female officers use force considerably less often than male ones, again especially when it comes to black civilians.
  • Much of the disparity in stops, arrests, and use of force results from differences in pursuing low-level offenses, especially in majority-black neighborhoods.

The data show (as a sort of inverse image of the above list) that white male officers stop, arrest, and use force more often, especially on people of color, and frequently as a result of minor crimes or “discretionary stops” with vague justifications.

This diagram shows a sampling of the collected data, indicating stops, arrests, and uses of force by officers on a map of the Wentworth District of Chicago.

The researchers are careful to point out that as conclusive as the patterns may appear to be, it’s important to understand that there is no causal mechanism studied or suggested. In fact they expressly point out that the data could be interpreted in two directions:

One explanation for these disparities centers on racial bias, i.e., white officers are more likely than Black officers to harass Black civilians. Technically, it is also possible that Black officers respond more leniently when observing crimes in progress.

More study is required, but they point out that one explanation — leniency by Black officers on minor offenses — has very little effect on public safety (violent crimes are addressed largely the same regardless of race and gender). The other — systemic racism — is significantly more harmful. Though they are “observationally equivalent” in the context of this data specifically, they are not equivalent in consequence. (Nor in likelihood — nor are they entirely incompatible with each other.)

In a valuable commentary on the paper and its implications, Yale’s Philip Atiba Goff notes that its findings are rich in implications that we ignore at our peril:

The magnitude of the differences provides strong evidence that — at least in some cities — the number of officers who identify with vulnerable groups can matter quite a bit in predicting police behavior. Although this does not settle the matter, the work stands alone in its ability to make apples-to-apples comparisons across officers – regardless of how many may be bad apples.

Given that Ba et al. find negligible demographic differences in officers’ responses to community violence, such a large difference in discretionary stops compels a reader to ask: Are any of those excess stops by white officers necessary? Should a department even be making them, given the demonstrated risk for abuse so evident in vulnerable communities?

Are any of those excess use of force incidents by white officers necessary? And if the excess force is not necessary for public safety, why does the department target Black communities for so much physical coercion? These questions are difficult to answer outside a broader engagement with the purpose of policing — and its limitations.

In other words, while it may require further study to get at the core of these issues, police departments may look at them and find that their resources are not necessarily being used to best effect. Indeed they may have to face the possibility — if only to refute it — that much of what officers do has little, no, or even negative value to the community. As Goff concludes:

With violence trending downward the past three decades, mostly troubling small geographic areas, and possibly occupying a small portion of police activity, what should the role of police be? Failing to take seriously the possibility that the answer should be “much less” may end up frustrating both researchers and a public that has been asking the question for far longer than most scientists.

This revealing study was only possible because the authors and legal authorities in Chicago compelled the police there to release this data. As noted above it can be difficult, if it is even possible, to collect large-scale data from any department, let alone from many departments for analysis at a national scale. The authors freely admit that their findings, in their specificity to Chicago, may not apply equally in other cities.

But that’s meant to be a call to action; if when finally given access to real data, researchers find problems of this magnitude, every department in the country should be weighing the benefits and risks of continued obfuscation with those of openness and collaboration.

#columbia-university, #justice, #policing, #princeton-university, #racism, #science, #tc, #uc-irvine, #university-of-pennsylvania, #yale-university

He Wants to Save Classics From Whiteness. Can the Field Survive?

Dan-el Padilla Peralta thinks classicists should knock ancient Greece and Rome off their pedestal — even if that means destroying their discipline.

#black-people, #colleges-and-universities, #content-type-personal-profile, #greece, #history-academic-subject, #princeton-university, #slavery-historical, #whites

Getting Married Where It All Began

Brandon Shih and Wenyi Gu met in their first college class, only to discover they lived in the same dorm. Almost a decade later, they eloped on the college campus where they fell in love.

#princeton-university, #weddings-and-engagements

Princeton to Pay Nearly $1.2 Million to Female Professors to Address Inequity

A U.S. Department of Labor review of staff wages from 2012 to 2014 found disparities between male and female professors.

#colleges-and-universities, #discrimination, #labor-department-us, #princeton-university, #wages-and-salaries, #women-and-girls

Princeton Dropping Woodrow Wilson and Renaming a College After Black Alumna

It will be named after Mellody Hobson and built where a college once bore Woodrow Wilson’s name. Princeton in June said the former president was a racist who segregated the Civil Service.

#ariel-investments-llc, #black-people, #colleges-and-universities, #discrimination, #hobson-mellody, #names-organizational, #philanthropy, #princeton-university, #race-and-ethnicity, #wilson-college, #wilson-woodrow

Princeton Admitted Past Racism. Now It Is Under Investigation.

The Trump administration opened a civil rights investigation into the university after its president acknowledged the role of systemic racism at the school and in society.

#affirmative-action, #black-lives-matter-movement, #civil-rights-and-liberties, #colleges-and-universities, #discrimination, #eisgruber-christopher-l, #ivy-league, #justice-department, #princeton-university, #race-and-ethnicity, #united-states-politics-and-government

Google Coronavirus Apps Give it Way to Access Location Data

Some government agencies that use the software said they were surprised that Google may pick up the locations of certain app users. Others said they had unsuccessfully pushed Google to make a change.

#android-operating-system, #apple-inc, #bluetooth-wireless-technology, #computer-security, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #coronavirus-risks-and-safety-concerns, #denmark, #general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr, #germany, #global-positioning-system, #google-inc, #gps, #ios-operating-system, #latvia, #merkel-angela, #mobile-applications, #princeton-university, #privacy, #sap, #surveillance-of-citizens-by-government, #switzerland, #wurtzburg

‘Freeholder,’ Title ‘Born From Racism,’ to Be Eliminated

New Jersey will replace “freeholder,” the 18th-century designation for county lawmakers, with the word “commissioner.”

#american-museum-of-natural-history, #black-lives-matter-movement, #coughlin-craig-j-1958, #discrimination, #freeholder, #george-floyd-protests-2020, #monuments-and-memorials-structures, #murphy-philip-d-1957, #new-jersey, #politics-and-government, #princeton-university, #race-and-ethnicity, #state-legislatures, #sweeney-stephen-m

Colleges Plan to Reopen Campuses, but for Just Some Students at a Time

To provide some semblance of the campus experience during a pandemic, colleges say large chunks of the student body will have to stay away and study remotely for all or part of the year.

#colleges-and-universities, #cornell-university, #coronavirus-reopenings, #dormitories, #e-learning, #foreign-students-in-us, #georgia-institute-of-technology, #harvard-university, #immigration-and-customs-enforcement-us, #princeton-university, #rutgers-the-state-university-of-new-jersey, #stanford-university, #tuition, #university-of-pennsylvania, #yale-university

The Ghost of Woodrow Wilson

The debts our institutions owe to the problematic past can’t just be canceled.

#columbus-christopher, #jefferson-thomas, #lincoln-abraham, #monuments-and-memorials-structures, #princeton-university, #wilson-woodrow, #yale-university

What Woodrow Wilson Cost My Grandfather

My grandfather lost his prestigious job after President Wilson segregated the government.

#blacks, #colleges-and-universities, #davis-john-abraham-1862-1928, #discrimination, #princeton-university, #segregation-and-desegregation, #wilson-woodrow

Princeton Dropping Wilson’s Name From School Over His “Racist Thinking”

University trustees concluded that Wilson’s “racist thinking and policies make him an inappropriate namesake for a school or college,” Princeton’s president said on Saturday.

#appointments-and-executive-changes, #black-people, #colleges-and-universities, #discrimination, #names-organizational, #new-jersey, #princeton-university, #wilson-woodrow

Lawyer Colinford Mattis Accused in Molotov Cocktail Attack on Police

A Princeton graduate and a human rights lawyer were both charged in an attack that left a police car dashboard charred. No one was injured.

#brooklyn-nyc, #demonstrations-protests-and-riots, #legal-profession, #princeton-university

After 274 Years, Princeton Will Have Its First Black Valedictorian

Given Princeton’s troubled history with slavery, the valedictorian said he hoped the achievement “serves as inspiration to black students coming up behind me.”

#black-people, #colleges-and-universities, #education, #ivy-league, #johnson-nicholas, #new-jersey, #princeton-university

In a potential big win for renewable energy, Form Energy gets its first grid-scale battery installation

Form Energy, which is developing what it calls ultra-low-cost, long-duration energy storage for the grid, has signed a contract with the Minnesota-based Great River Energy to develop a 1 megawatt, 150 megawatt hour pilot project.

The second-largest electric utility in the U.S., Great River Energy’s installation in Cambridge, Minn. will be the first commercial deployment of the venture-backed battery technology developer’s long-duration energy storage technology.

From Energy’s battery system is significant for its ability to deliver 1 megawatt of power for 150 hours — a huge leap over the lithium ion batteries currently in use for most grid-scale storage projects. Those battery systems can last for two- to four-hours.

The step change in the duration of energy delivery should allow energy storage projects to replace the peaking power plants that rely on coal and natural gas to smooth demand on the grid.

“Long duration energy storage solutions will play an entirely different role in a clean electricity system than the conventional battery storage systems being deployed at scale today,” said Jesse Jenkins, an assistant professor at Princeton University who studies low-carbon energy systems engineering, in a statement. “Lithium-ion batteries are well suited to fast bursts of energy production, but they run out of energy after just a few hours. A true low-cost, long-duration energy storage solution that can sustain output for days, would fill gaps in wind and solar energy production that would otherwise require firing up a fossil-fueled power plant. A technology like that could make a reliable, affordable 100% renewable electricity system a real possibility,”

Backed with over $49 million in venture financing from investors including MIT’s The Engine investment vehicle; Eni Next, the corporate venture capital arm of the Italian energy firm Eni Spa, and the Bill Gates-backed sustainability focused investment firm, Breakthrough Energy Ventures, Form Energy has developed a new storage technology called an “aqueous air” battery system.

“Our vision at Form Energy is to unlock the power of renewable energy to transform the grid with our proprietary long-duration storage. This project represents a bold step toward proving that vision of an affordable, renewable future is possible without sacrificing reliability,” said Mateo Jaramillo, the chief executive of Form Energy, in a statement.

Form’s pitch to utilities relies on more than just a groundbreaking energy storage technology, and includes an assessment of how best utilities can optimize their energy portfolios using a proprietary software analytics system. That software, was built to model high penetration renewables at a system level to figure out how storage can be combined with renewable energy to create a low-cost energy source that can deliver better returns to energy providers.

“Great River Energy is excited to partner with Form Energy on this important project. The electrical grid is increasingly supplied by renewable sources of energy. Commercially viable long-duration storage could increase reliability by ensuring that the power generated by renewable energy is available at all hours to serve our membership. Such storage could be particularly important during extreme weather conditions that last several days. Long-duration storage also provides an excellent hedge against volatile energy prices,” said Great River Energy Vice President and Chief Power Supply Officer Jon Brekke, in a statement.

Ultimately, this deployment is intended to be the first of many installations of Form Energy’s battery systems, according to the statement from both companies.

“Long duration energy storage solutions will play an entirely different role in a clean electricity system than the conventional battery storage systems being deployed at scale today,” said Jesse Jenkins, an assistant professor at Princeton University who studies low-carbon energy systems engineering, in a statement. “Lithium-ion batteries are well suited to fast bursts of energy production, but they run out of energy after just a few hours. A true low-cost, long-duration energy storage solution that can sustain output for days, would fill gaps in wind and solar energy production that would otherwise require firing up a fossil-fueled power plant. A technology like that could make a reliable, affordable 100% renewable electricity system a real possibility,”

#articles, #breakthrough-energy-ventures, #cambridge, #energy, #energy-storage, #minnesota, #mit, #natural-gas, #partner, #princeton-university, #renewable-energy, #tc, #united-states

This Florida Student Was Accepted at All 8 Ivy League Schools

Craig McFarland, the valedictorian of his high school in Jacksonville, Fla., received acceptance letters from 17 colleges and universities in all.

#brown-university, #colleges-and-universities, #columbia-university, #cornell-university, #craig-mcfarland, #dartmouth-college, #duke-university, #emory-university, #florida, #florida-state-university, #georgia-institute-of-technology, #harvard-university, #ivy-league, #jacksonville-fla, #princeton-university, #stanford-university, #university-of-pennsylvania, #yale-university

John Horton Conway, a ‘Magical Genius’ in Math, Dies at 82

He made profound contributions to number theory, coding theory, probability theory, topology, algebra and more — and created games from it all. He died of the coronavirus.

#cambridge-university, #conway-john-horton-1937, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #deaths-obituaries, #mathematics, #princeton-university