Large Majority of Americans Blame Warming for Extreme Weather

As Americans have increasingly experienced extreme weather events, their perception of climate change has shifted, survey results show

#climate-change, #environment, #sociology

How Culturally Significant Mammals Tell the Story of Social Ascension for Black Americans

Juneteenth offers an opportunity to reflect on the wildlife linked to a people’s transformation

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#animals, #biology, #ecology, #environment, #inequality, #social-sciences, #sociology

Suicides among Black People May Be Vastly Undercounted

Lack of data explains why

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#diversity, #inequality, #social-sciences, #sociology

What We Know about Mass School Shootings–and Shooters–in the U.S.

Criminologists explain what the shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Tex., and other deadly assaults have in common

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #public-health, #social-sciences, #sociology

Can Business Schools Really Help Us ‘Reimagine Capitalism’?

It’s not your grandfather’s M.B.A.

#business-schools, #capitalism-theory-and-philosophy, #colleges-and-universities, #executives-and-management-theory, #humanities, #psychology-and-psychologists, #sociology, #stanford-university, #university-of-toronto

How to Make Friends After a Pandemic — and Why You Should

The more efficient our lives get, the lazier we are about making and keeping friends.

#buddhism, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #coronavirus-return-to-office, #friendship, #loneliness, #quarantines, #sociology

New IPCC Report Looks at Neglected Element of Climate Action: People

For the first time, the report includes a chapter devoted to the social aspects of climate mitigation

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#climate-change, #environment, #sociology

How Do We End Wars? A Peace Researcher Puts Forward Some Innovative Approaches

Young people and women need to be more involved in a continual process of averting armed conflict

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#social-sciences, #sociology

How Religious Faith Can Shape Success in School

Boys from working-class families benefit from the social capital that religious belief can provide.

#education-k-12, #men-and-boys, #religion-and-belief, #sociology, #teenagers-and-adolescence

People, Not Science, Decide When a Pandemic Is Over

Historians of the 1918 influenza pandemic discuss lessons for what the future of COVID might look like

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#epidemiology, #health, #social-sciences, #sociology

How a Virus Exposed the Myth of Rugged Individualism

Humans evolved to be interdependent, not self-sufficient

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#behavior, #features, #mindbrain, #sociology

Todd Gitlin, a Voice and Critic of the New Left, Dies at 79

He earned his stripes in the antiwar movement of the 1960s. In his later years, he was often critical of his erstwhile kindred spirits.

#books-and-literature, #colleges-and-universities, #deaths-obituaries, #demonstrations-protests-and-riots, #gitlin-todd, #nineteen-hundred-sixties, #sociology, #students-for-a-democratic-society, #the-sixties-years-of-hope-days-of-rage-book, #writing-and-writers

Sara McLanahan, Who Studied Single Motherhood, Dies at 81

A Princeton sociologist and a single mother herself, she brought her own experience to her wide body of scholarly work.

#deaths-obituaries, #mclanahan-sara-f-1940-2021, #princeton-university, #research, #single-mothers, #sociology, #university-of-wisconsin

Citizen Militias in the U.S. Are Moving toward More Violent Extremism

In some members, a longing for “simpler” times is giving rise to deadly activities

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#features, #social-sciences, #sociology

Your Boss Wants to Spy on Your Inner Feelings

Tech companies now use AI to analyze your feelings in job interviews and public spaces. But the software seems prone to racial, cultural and gender bias

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#features, #social-sciences, #sociology

The Psychological Differences between Those Who Love and Loathe Black Friday Shopping

Some people are more “task-oriented,” while others focus more on making social connections

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#behavior, #mindbrain, #social-sciences, #sociology

Anxious, Avoidant or Secure: ‘Attached’ Is the Book That’s Shaping How We Understand Love

Over a decade after its publication, one book on dating has people firmly in its grip.

#dating-and-relationships, #psychology-and-psychologists, #sociology, #therapy-and-rehabilitation

The Life-Altering Differences Between White and Black Debt

The sociologist Louise Seamster discusses America’s student debt crisis and how higher education contributes to the racial wealth gap.

#colleges-and-universities, #income-inequality, #klein-ezra, #mcmillan-cottom-tressie, #sociology, #student-loans, #united-states, #united-states-economy

Facebook Makes Us Know Too Much About Each Other

On social media, exposure to those unlike us often makes us hate them.

#computers-and-the-internet, #facebook-inc, #social-conditions-and-trends, #social-media, #sociology

Pauline Bart, Sociologist Who Mapped Women’s Challenges, Dies at 91

She researched the ways gender biases harmed women, and she wrote about her findings in studies laced with compassion and wry humor.

#bart-pauline, #deaths-obituaries, #discrimination, #domestic-violence, #pornography, #sex-crimes, #sociology, #womens-rights

Let’s Discuss What Sinema Is Wearing

For public figures, presentation is politics.

#dresses, #fashion-and-apparel, #internal-sub-only-nl, #manchin-joe-iii, #politics-and-government, #sinema-kyrsten, #sociology, #womens-rights

Confronting the Political Determinants of Gun Violence

Addressing health inequities in the U.S. requires social and historical context

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#diversity, #health, #policy, #social-sciences, #sociology

Why Everyone Is Always Giving Unsolicited Advice

And why, even though I hate it, small talk is so important.

#facebook-inc, #instagram-inc, #internal-sub-only, #landers-ann, #reddit-inc, #social-media, #sociology, #women-and-girls

Education Doesn’t Inoculate Us from Vaccine Hesitancy

What we learn is filtered through our identities.

#colleges-and-universities, #coronavirus-risks-and-safety-concerns, #internal-sub-only, #lil-nas-x-rapper, #medicine-and-health, #parenting, #parton-dolly, #sociology, #vaccination-and-immunization

How 13 Reasons Why sparked years of suicide-contagion research

Back in 2017, the first season of the Netflix series <em>13 Reasons Why</em> sparked controversy about suicide contagion. Four years later, a new UCLA study offers guidance for Hollywood on how to best handle such topics going forward.

Enlarge / Back in 2017, the first season of the Netflix series 13 Reasons Why sparked controversy about suicide contagion. Four years later, a new UCLA study offers guidance for Hollywood on how to best handle such topics going forward. (credit: Netflix)

When 13 Reasons Why debuted on Netflix on March 31, 2017, it was initially met with mostly rave reviews from critics and viewers alike. Viewers appreciated the show’s frank and sensitive handling of such complex topics as suicide, bullying, rape, and depression. Within weeks, however, mental health professionals began voicing strong objections to the YA-targeted show’s treatment of suicide in particular—these professionals believed the depiction could trigger suicidal thoughts or actions in vulnerable teens. It’s well known that high-profile suicides can sometimes influence copycats, but the issue is less clear when it comes to fictional stories. Throughout the last four years, multiple, often contradictory studies on that very topic have since appeared. Some of the studies show negative impacts, while others show beneficial effects in young people who watched 13 Reasons Why.

The series aired its fourth and final season last year, but 13 Reasons Why continues to inspire research on the potential impact (positive or negative) of fictional stories on teen mental health. A new study available today from researchers affiliated with UCLA’s Center for Scholars and Storytellers focuses specifically on the show’s third season, and it shows that series like 13 Reasons Why can have a positive impact on teen mental health as long as the issues are depicted accurately and with empathy.

The report also recommends that appropriate supplementary resources be provided to viewers—which is a major challenge, since most viewers don’t engage with such resources even when they are available. But whether it’s a streaming series or accompanying readings, the researchers at UCLA’s Center for Scholars and Storytellers strongly believe that the media tweens and teens consume plays a crucial role in their development, as it does with any other young demographic.

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#13-reasons-why, #features, #gaming-culture, #netflix, #psychology, #science, #sociology, #streaming-television, #suicide-contagion, #ucla

The Pandemic Caused a Baby Bust, Not a Boom

Birth rates in many high-income countries declined in the months following the first wave, possibly because of economic uncertainty

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#social-sciences, #sociology

Why We Rally around Some Social Issues and Not Others

The answer involves an experiment with strange results and a dive into irrationality

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#social-sciences, #sociology

Stanley Aronowitz, Labor Scholar and Activist, Dies at 88

As a self-described “working-class intellectual,” he declared that direct action was more potent than collective bargaining or conventional politics.

#aronowitz-stanley, #colleges-and-universities, #deaths-obituaries, #labor-and-jobs, #organized-labor, #politics-and-government, #sociology

Conversations With Black Leaders in STEM

Black innovators and leaders discuss career paths, mentorship and diversity in science. This speaker series is hosted by the Black Employee Network at Springer Nature, the…

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#culture, #diversity, #ethics, #inequality, #social-sciences, #sociology

Bill Gamson, Sociologist and Inventor of Games, Dies at 87

He created a game of simulated baseball that was a precursor to today’s fantasy sports. As a professor, he devised a role-playing game to help students address societal problems.

#baseball, #colleges-and-universities, #deaths-obituaries, #fantasy-sports, #gamson-bill-1934-2021, #okrent-daniel, #rotisserie-baseball, #sociology

The History Behind ‘Mob’ Mentality

Why do some mass gatherings turn violent? Experts in crowd behavior say there’s still much to learn.

#capitol-building-washington-dc, #civil-rights-and-liberties, #civil-rights-movement-1954-68, #demonstrations-protests-and-riots, #sociology, #storming-of-the-us-capitol-jan-2021

Can’t Find It at the Store?

How to make sure everyone gets what they need — and feels good about it.

#barter, #quarantine-life-and-culture, #sociology

Want to Abolish the Police? Consider Becoming an Officer Instead

If more people in law enforcement cared about the things progressives support, we’d all benefit.

#police, #police-brutality-misconduct-and-shootings, #sociology

Coronavirus May Have Long-Term Social Behavior Effects

Fear of others may linger long after the pandemic is over. But so may a new sense of community.

#altruism, #anxiety-and-stress, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #emotions, #psychology-and-psychologists, #quarantines, #sociology

This Is How You Live When the World Falls Apart

The Great Alaska Earthquake of 1964 surprised everyone by showing that natural disasters can bring out more kindness than selfishness.

#alaska, #anchorage-alaska, #disasters-and-emergencies, #earthquakes, #sociology, #volunteers-and-community-service