50, 100 & 150 Years Ago: July 2022

Count women as workers; cement from sewage

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#50-100150-years-ago, #history, #technology

Electronic Skin Lets Humans Feel What Robots Do–And Vice Versa

An integration of soft materials, sensors and flexible electronics is bringing robotic “skin” closer than ever to reality

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#biotech, #electronics, #robotics, #technology

We Asked GPT-3 to Write an Academic Paper about Itself.–Then We Tried to Get It Published

An artificially intelligent first author presents many ethical questions—and could upend the publishing process

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#artificial-intelligence, #technology

Who Is Liable when AI Kills?

We need to change rules and institutions while still promoting innovation to protect people from faulty AI

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#artificial-intelligence, #technology

How Indigenous Groups Are Using 3-D Technology to Preserve Ancient Practices

To safeguard fragile cultural objects, some groups are replicating them with digital models

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#anthropology, #arts, #culture, #engineering, #social-sciences, #technology

How Connected Cars Can Map Urban Heat Islands

Crowdsourced vehicle data trace the contours of dangerous city temperatures

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#advances, #automobiles, #environment, #technology, #weather

Roe v. Wade Was Overturned. Here’s how Your Phone Could Be Used to Spy on You.

From figuring out how often you go to the bathroom to potentially being used to prosecute you, your trusty smartphone might not be so trusty in a post-Roe world.

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#privacy, #technology

Spray-On, Rinse-Off Food ‘Wrapper’ Can Cut Plastic Packaging

The coating deters microorganisms to fight both food waste and foodborne illness

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#engineering, #environment, #food, #pollution, #technology

To Prevent Nuclear Annihilation, Resume Negotiations Immediately

The war in Ukraine shows the urgency of nuclear arms control

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#energy, #politics, #technology, #the-science-agenda

Tiny, Tumbling Origami Robots Could Help with Targeted Drug Delivery

The design’s origami pattern creates the flexibility needed to deliver compounds to specific areas of the body

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#engineering, #robotics, #technology

AI Can Predict Potential Nutrient Deficiencies from Space

New work maps a region’s nutrient landscape

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#advances, #aerospace, #artificial-intelligence, #technology

Better Face Masks Are Possible: Here Are Some Winning Designs

A two-part competition aims to spark innovation and connect the groups trying to redesign high-quality masks that protect against COVID

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#engineering, #health, #public-health, #technology

Artificial General Intelligence Is Not as Imminent as You Might Think

A close look reveals that the newest systems, including DeepMind’s much-hyped Gato, are still stymied by the same old problems

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#artificial-intelligence, #technology

The ‘Wall of Wind’ Can Blow Away Buildings at Category 5 Hurricane Strength

The test facility is helping engineers design safer homes—but it’s not powerful enough to mimic the stronger hurricanes fueled by climate change

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#environment, #natural-disasters, #technology, #weather

Political Affiliation Influences Our Fear of Data Collection

It’s not government Americans don’t trust with their data; it’s the opposite political party

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#privacy, #technology

The Weather Myth: Lost Women of Science Podcast, Season 2, Bonus Episode

When we first started researching Klára Dán von Neumann, we thought she was “the computer scientist you should thank for your smartphone’s weather app.” It turns…

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#computing, #technology

Kyiv Cruise Missile Strike Highlights Need to Protect U.S. Cities

A top U.S. commander wants to test technology that can better defend domestic targets

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#aerospace, #defense, #technology

50, 100 & 150 Years Ago: June 2022

Innovation and discovery as chronicled by Scientific American

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#50-100150-years-ago, #environment, #health, #planetary-science, #spacephysics, #technology

We Shouldn’t Try to Make Conscious Software–Until We Should

Eventually, the most ethical option might be to divert all resources toward building very happy machines

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#artificial-intelligence, #computing, #consciousness, #ethics, #mindbrain, #social-sciences, #technology

Drones Could Spot Crime Scenes from Afar

A system could aid forensic searches and crime-scene mapping by detecting reflections from human materials

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#advances, #engineering, #robotics, #technology

Yes, Phones Can Reveal if Someone Gets an Abortion

To protect personal information from companies that sell data, some individuals are relying on privacy guides instead of government regulation or industry transparency

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #health-care, #politics, #privacy, #reproduction, #social-sciences, #technology

Air-Conditioning Should Be a Human Right in the Climate Crisis

We need to protect vulnerable people from killer heat without destroying the environment

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#climate-change, #engineering, #environment, #health, #inequality, #public-health, #renewable-energy, #technology

Mysterious ‘Retron’ DNA Helps Scientists Edit Human Genes

For the first time, researchers have used this bacterial tool to edit genes in human cells

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#advances, #biotech, #technology

Rechargeable Molten Salt Battery Freezes Energy in Place for Long-Term Storage

The technology could bring more renewable energy to the power grid

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#energy, #technology

New Drones Could Spot Wildfires Earlier, Even Help Snuff Them Out

And other new technology could detect carbon monoxide emitted just when flames start

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#natural-disasters, #technology

Electric Planes Take Off

More than 170 projects are underway worldwide

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#aerospace, #technology, #transportation

How Language-Generation AIs Could Transform Science

An expert in emerging technologies warns that software designed to summarize, translate and write like humans might exacerbate distrust in science

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#artificial-intelligence, #ethics, #language, #social-sciences, #technology

New Tech Conveys Emotional Touch Long-Distance

Complex social information can be felt through a virtual touch

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#advances, #engineering, #technology

Cryptocurrencies and NFTs Are a Buyer Beware Market

Scams and volatility plague this market, and the Biden administration is still trying to decide where the federal government fits in

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#policy, #privacy, #technology, #the-science-agenda

The Navy Extracted a Jet Fighter from 12,400 Feet below the South China Sea

But the U.S. must probe even further to catch up with China’s access to the ocean’s deepest reaches

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#defense, #oceans, #politics, #technology

The Navy Extracted a Jet Fighter from 12,400 Feet below the Surface of the South China Sea

But the U.S. must probe even further to catch up with China’s access to the ocean’s deepest reaches

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#defense, #oceans, #politics, #technology

Can semiconductor makers meet surging demands sustainably?

Can semiconductor makers meet surging demands sustainably?

Enlarge (credit: Getty Images)

Earth Day was April 22, and its usual message—take care of our planet—has been given added urgency by the challenges highlighted in the latest IPCC report. This year, Ars is taking a look at the technologies we normally cover, from cars to chipmaking, and finding out how we can boost their sustainability and minimize their climate impact.

While chips have been in short supply lately, there has also been growing concern about their environmental impact. Droughts and COVID caused factory (or fab) shutdowns just as the pandemic fueled a surge in demand for medical devices, tele-everything, and all the other gadgets to help people remain productive and less isolated. But the demand for chips has been growing for some time, making it important to ask whether meeting these demands is compatible with climate and sustainability goals.

The answer is that it’s a work in progress. Semiconductor manufacturers are building new facilities in Taiwan, the US, Europe, and elsewhere, providing an opportunity for the industry to incorporate sustainability from the very start. Doing so will help leading chip manufacturers meet voluntary pledges, such as reaching net-zero emissions by 2040 and 2050. These promises are encouraging, but they’re still shy of the urgent action needed, according to the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report. And pledging doesn’t guarantee delivery—but contributions from researchers, external regulators, and consumers can help with that.

Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

#climate, #emissions, #science, #technology

AI Sommelier Generates Wine Reviews without Ever Opening a Bottle

A new algorithm writes wine and beer reviews that sound like they were penned by human critics. Is that a good thing?

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#artificial-intelligence, #language, #technology

Lost Women of Science Podcast, Season 2, Episode 5: La Jolla

Klára Dán von Neumann encounters a new home, a new husband and a new project

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#computing, #technology

It’s Time to Open the Black Box of Social Media

Social media companies need to give their data to independent researchers to better understand how to keep users safe

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#computing, #technology

Record-Breaking Jumping Robot Can Leap a 10-Story Building

To propel itself higher than any known engineered jumper or animal can, it had to ignore the limits of biology

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#engineering, #robotics, #space-exploration, #technology

These Three Overlooked Black Inventors Shaped Our Lives

The innovators changed the nature of household work, industrial production and high technology

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#engineering, #technology

An Old-Fashioned Economic Tool Can Tame Pricing Algorithms

Left unchecked, pricing algorithms might unintentionally discriminate and collude to fix prices

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#artificial-intelligence, #economics, #inequality, #social-sciences, #technology

Tiny Antennas Made from DNA Light Up Protein Activity

A new method for monitoring proteins could lead to better drug development

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#advances, #biotech, #technology

Brain-Reading Devices Help Paralyzed People Move, Talk and Touch

Implants are becoming more sophisticated—and are attracting commercial interest

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#biotech, #health, #mindbrain, #neuroscience, #technology

Lost Women of Science Podcast, Season 2, Episode 4: Netherworld

Klára Dán von Neumann enters the Netherworld of computer simulations and postwar Los Alamos National Laboratory

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#computing, #technology

AI Drug Discovery Systems Might Be Repurposed to Make Chemical Weapons, Researchers Warn

A demonstration with drug design software shows the ease with which toxic molecules can be generated

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#artificial-intelligence, #defense, #technology

AIs Spot Drones with Help from a Fly Eye

A new bio-inspired algorithm picks out the signal from the noise

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#animals, #artificial-intelligence, #biology, #engineering, #technology

How to Fix Quantum Computing Bugs

The same physics that makes quantum computers powerful also makes them finicky. New techniques aim to correct errors faster than they can build up

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#computing, #features, #quantum-computing, #technology

Lost Women of Science Podcast, Season 2, Episode 3: The Experimental Rabbit

ENIAC, an early electronic computer, gets a makeover

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#computing, #technology

Some Medical Ethicists Endorse NFTs–Here’s Why

The technology could help patients exert control over their medical data

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#ethics, #health, #health-care, #privacy, #public-health, #technology

Love Computers? Love History? Listen to This Podcast

In the newest season of Lost Women of Science, we enter a world of secrecy, computers and nuclear weapons—and see how Klára Dán von Neumann was a part of all of it.

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#computing, #technology

Lost Women of Science Podcast, Season 2, Episode 2: Women Needed

Klára Dán von Neumann arrives in Princeton, N.J., just as war breaks out in Europe

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#computing, #technology

Will Russia Use Chemical Weapons in Ukraine? Researchers Evaluate the Risks

Analysts explain why some fear that the Russian military will use chemical weapons—and how the world would know if it did

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#defense, #health, #politics, #public-health, #social-sciences, #technology, #toxicology

New ‘Ionogels’ Are Tough, Stretchable and Easy to Make

They could find use as protective material, 3-D printer “ink” or longer-lasting batteries

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#chemistry, #electronics, #materials-science, #technology