Noah’s Spaceship

A craft built to save Earth’s biodiversity from a planetary crisis would be far tinier—but vastly more far-reaching—than the biblical Ark

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#space, #the-sciences

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Sea Angels and Sea Butterflies Reveal Climate Change Consequences

The delicate marine animals known as sea angels are facing unprecedented change because of global warming

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#biology, #climate, #sustainability, #the-sciences

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Eating Turkey Does Not Really Make You Sleepy

Don’t blame the tryptophan in your Thanksgiving turkey. The post-dinner drowsiness probably results from carbs and alcohol

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#biology, #chemistry, #the-sciences, #wellness

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Thanksgiving and the Myth of Native American “Savages”

Prominent scientists exaggerate the violence of Native Americans, whom European invaders ravaged.

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#policyethics, #the-sciences

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Visualizing the Rhythm of Food

Interactive data visualization charts the changing popularity of 195 different foods over time

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#artsculture, #the-sciences

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The Foreigners at Your Thanksgiving Table

Many of the "American" foods we love came from parts of the world Pres. Trump has vilified

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#artsculture, #the-sciences

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Do Wine over Those Brussels Sprouts

Taking a swig of red wine before eating Brussels sprouts appears to moderate Brussels sprouts’ polarizing flavor. Christopher Intagliata reports

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#biology, #chemistry, #cognition, #mind, #the-sciences

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What We’re Thankful for at Scientific American

From our virtual Thanksgiving table to yours

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#artsculture, #the-sciences

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Echolocation Drains Bats Traveling through Noise

Bats expend more energy navigating in loud conditions

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#advances, #biology, #the-sciences

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Duckbill Dino Odyssey Ended in Africa

A duckbill dinosaur jawbone found in Morocco means that dinosaurs crossed a large body of water to reach Africa.  

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#earth, #natural-disasters, #the-sciences

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China’s Chang’e-5 Mission Launches to Collect Lunar Samples

After a 44-year hiatus, humans are on the verge of returning fresh material from the moon

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#space, #the-sciences

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How Misinformation Spreads–and Why We Trust It

The most effective misinformation starts with seeds of truth

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#behaviorsociety, #features, #mind, #the-sciences

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Why Social Media Became the Perfect Incubator for Hoaxes and Misinformation

Data scientists are studying how information spreading online influences our social dynamics and what, if anything, can be done to smooth polarization

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#behaviorsociety, #features, #the-sciences

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The Scientific Benefits of Social Distancing

Avoiding too much direct contact with colleagues can lead to more independent thinking

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#policyethics, #the-sciences

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Bumblebees’ Self-Image Gets Them through Tight Spots

Sridhar Ravi was outdoors with his colleagues on a summer day in Germany when a group of bumblebees grabbed his attention. As the bees made their way from flower to flower, they skillfully flew…

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#biology, #the-sciences

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To Understand How Science Denial Works, Look to History

The same tactics used to cast doubt on the dangers of smoking and climate change are now being used to downplay COVID

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#observatory, #policyethics, #the-sciences

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Distrust Authorities, Including Me

The presidential election and pandemic have highlighted the fallibility of experts, but that doesn’t mean we should dismiss them all

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#behaviorsociety, #the-sciences

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The Noble Gases

Science in meter and verse

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#artsculture, #meter, #the-sciences

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If It Smells like Dirt, Fire Ants Are Interested

For these swarming, stinging insects it’s the aroma of home sweet home

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#biology, #the-sciences

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Readers Respond to the July 2020 Issue

Letters to the editor from the July 2020 issue of Scientific American

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#letters, #policyethics, #the-sciences

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Arecibo Observatory to Close Its Giant Eye on the Sky

After suffering severe damage from broken cables that cannot be readily repaired, the observatory’s enormous radio telescope is now slated for “controlled decommissioning”

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#space, #the-sciences

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See a Male Seahorse Give Birth

Unlike almost all other animal species, it is male seahorses who become pregnant and birth young

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#biology, #the-sciences

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Doing the Touchy Math on Who Should Get a COVID Vaccine First

Mathematicians model pandemic scenarios by plugging thorny ethical and logistical issues into calculations

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #math, #medicine, #public-health, #the-sciences

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Storm-Surfing Parasites Spread Widely

Major hurricanes scramble marine-creature populations

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#advances, #biology, #the-sciences

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New Scientist-Candidates for U.S. Congress Fared Worse Than Expected in 2020

Even with big health issues in the headlines, most of these challengers lost, though advocates hope the races gave science a higher policy profile

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#policyethics, #the-sciences

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Information Overload Helps Fake News Spread, and Social Media Knows It

Understanding how algorithm manipulators exploit our cognitive vulnerabilities empowers us to fight back

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#behaviorsociety, #computing, #features, #tech, #the-sciences

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Legendary Arecibo Telescope Will Close Forever, And Scientists Are Reeling

New satellite image reveals the damage that shut down the facility, ending an era in astronomical observation

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#physics, #space, #the-sciences

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New Space Weather Network Extends over Africa

Sensors will monitor solar emissions that threaten GPS and radio signals

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#advances, #engineering, #space, #tech, #the-sciences

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Early Mammals Had Social Lives, Too

Chipmunk-like animals that lived among the dinos appear to have been social creatures, which suggests that sociality arose in mammals earlier than scientists thought. Christopher Intagliata…

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#biology, #evolution, #the-sciences

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Prospects for Life on Venus Fade–But Aren’t Dead Yet

Debate continues over controversial report of phosphine in the planet’s atmosphere, as researchers re-analyze data and find a fainter signal

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#space, #the-sciences

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NASA Celebrates Crew-1 Arrival at Space Station

SpaceX’s first 4-astronaut mission for the agency is a milestone in human spaceflight

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#space, #the-sciences

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Strange Supernovae Upend Expectations

Most stars die in fairly predictable ways, but astronomers have discovered a growing catalog of unusual stellar deaths that challenge the traditional picture

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#features, #space, #the-sciences

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Sharing the Human Side of Science

Exploding stars, Top 10 Emerging Technologies, hand transplants, and more in the December issue of Scientific American

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#from-the-editor, #policyethics, #the-sciences

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Four Years after Science Took a Hit, There’s Hope

But 500 Women Scientists, formed in the aftermath of Trump’s 2016 election, still has plenty of work to do

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#policyethics, #the-sciences

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Stellar Smashups May Fuel Planetary Habitability, Study Suggests

Radioactive elements produced by colliding neutron stars could make the difference between living and lifeless worlds

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#physics, #space, #the-sciences

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10 Steps That Can Restore Scientific Integrity in Government

Here’s what the Biden-Harris administration can do to repair the damage Trump has done

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#policyethics, #the-sciences

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Ten Steps that Can Restore Scientific Integrity in Government

What the Biden-Harris administration can do to repair the damage Trump has done

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#policyethics, #the-sciences

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Scientists Failed to Use Common Sense Early in the Pandemic

The WHO’s initial advice not to wear masks in the fight to contain COVID sowed dangerous confusion

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #observatory, #policyethics, #public-health, #the-sciences

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We Need More Scientists in the U.S. Diplomatic Corps

Their creativity, entrepreneurism and grasp of the complexity of the world are crucial attributes

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#policyethics, #the-sciences

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The Empty Half of the Glass May Also Be Full

How many scientific breakthroughs have been lost because they came from outside the mainstream?

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#policyethics, #the-sciences

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50, 100 & 150 Years Ago: November 2020

Nuclear future, data on hurricanes, and machines replace muscle on the farm

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#50-100150-years-ago, #policyethics, #the-sciences

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A New Cell Map of the Human Heart

Scientists have created an atlas of cardiac cells in six regions that could help chart what goes awry in heart disease

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#biology, #the-body, #the-sciences

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Why Polls Were Mostly Wrong

Princeton’s Sam Wang had to eat his words (and a cricket) in 2016. He talks about the impacts of the pandemic and QAnon on public-opinion tallies in 2020

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#behaviorsociety, #health, #public-health, #the-sciences

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Divide and Conquer Could Be Good COVID Strategy

COVID might be fought efficiently with fewer shutdowns by restricting activities only in a particular area with a population up to 200,000 when its case rate rises above a chosen threshold.  

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#health, #math, #public-health, #the-sciences

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Do NASA’s Lunar Exploration Rules Violate Space Law?

The Artemis Accords—NASA guidelines supposedly designed to regulate global cooperation on the moon—may serve to circumvent preexisting international treaties

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#space, #the-sciences

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A Cosmic Video Mini-Series to Ponder Gravity, the Universe, and Everything

Earthly matters got you stressed? Here is an opportunity to elevate your mind above the terrestrial din with three cosmic questions.

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#space, #the-sciences

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A Cosmic Video Miniseries to Ponder Gravity, the Universe and Everything

Earthly matters got you stressed? Here is an opportunity to elevate your mind above the terrestrial din with three cosmic questions

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#space, #the-sciences

0

Dramatic Scope of the Anthropocene Can Be Seen from Above

Aerial photography highlights the effect humankind is having on the earth

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#evolution, #the-sciences

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China Set to Retrieve First Moon Rocks in 40 Years

Chang’e-5 has just one lunar day to collect material from a previously unexplored region of the moon’s near side

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#space, #the-sciences

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Solving the Mysteries of Ancient Plagues

DNA from bacteria and viruses, recovered from human remains, shows how pathogens helped to topple empires and change civilizations

— Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

#features, #public-health, #the-sciences

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