Thoma Bravo takes a stake in threat intelligence provider Intel 471

Private equity giant Thoma Bravo has taken a stake in Intel 471, a provider of cyber threat intelligence for enterprises and governments.

The strategic growth investment, which comes as organizations double-down on cybersecurity amid a pandemic-fueled rise in cyber threats, will enable Intel 471 to evolve its product suite, broaden its go-to-market strategy and continue to “aggressively pursue innovation,” according to Thoma Bravo. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Intel 471, a Texas-based firm founded in 2014, takes a preventative approach to cybersecurity. It leverages its access to forums and dark web marketplaces to equip organizations with intelligence and monitoring on threat actors and malware attacks. Using the company’s platform, businesses can track threat actor activity and vulnerability exploits, analyze near-real-time monitoring of malware activity, trace threats that could cause security breaches, and receive alerts on compromised credentials.

“As cybercriminals and their tactics become increasingly sophisticated, our monitoring and intelligence solutions have become mission-critical, with organizations of all sizes looking to us to help them protect against attacks,” said Mark Arena, CEO of Intel 471.

Arena, along with fellow co-founder Jason Passwaters, will continue to lead Intel 471 and will retain a “significant” ownership position

Thoma Bravo’s investment in Intel 471 sees the private equity firm continue its cybersecurity investing spending-spree. Its recent $12.3 billion purchase of Proofpoint, for example, said to be the largest acquisition in cybersecurity history, trumps Broadcom’s $10.7 billion purchase of Symantec, Intel’s $7.6 billion acquisition of McAfee, and Okta’s proposed $6.5 billion acquisition of Auth0.

Thoma Bravo also previously acquired Sophos for $3.9 billion, took a majority stake in LogRhythm and paid $544 million for authentication startup Imprivata. 

#auth0, #broadcom, #ceo, #computing, #cybercrime, #cyberwarfare, #logrhythm, #mcafee, #security, #security-software, #sophos, #symantec, #technology, #texas, #thoma-bravo

Cybersecurity VC funding surges to a record $11.5B in 2021

The pandemic completely upended the threat landscape as we know it. Ransomware accounted for an estimated 2.9 million attacks so far in 2021, and supply-chain attacks that targeted Kaseya and SolarWinds have increased fourfold over 2020, according to the European Union’s cybersecurity agency, ENISA, which recently warned that the more traditional cybersecurity protections are no longer effective in defending against these types of attacks.

This has created an unprecedented need for emerging technologies, attracting both organizations and investors to look closer at newer cybersecurity technologies.

“We are seeing a perfect storm of factors coming together to create the most aggressive threat landscape in history for commercial and government organizations around the world,” said Dave DeWalt, founder and managing director of NightDragon, which recently invested in multi-cloud security startup vArmour. “As an investor and advisor, I feel we have a responsibility to help these organizations better prepare themselves to mitigate this growing risk.”

According to Momentum Cyber’s latest cybersecurity market review out Wednesday, investors poured $11.5 billion in total venture capital financing into cybersecurity startups in the first half of 2021, up from $4.7 billion during the same period a year earlier.

More than 36 of the 430 total transactions surpassed the $100 million mark, according to Momentum, which includes the $543 million Series A raised by passwordless authentication company Transmit Security and the $525 million round closed by cloud-based security company Lacework.

“As an investor in the cyber market for over fifteen years, I can say that this market climate is unlike anything we’ve seen to date,” said Bob Ackerman, founder and managing director of AllegisCyber Capital, which recently led a $26.5 million investment in cybersecurity startup Panaseer. “It is encouraging to finally see CEOs, boards of directors, investors and more paying serious attention to this space and putting the resources and capital in place to fund the innovations that address the cybersecurity challenges of today and tomorrow.”

Unsurprisingly, M&A volume also saw a massive increase during the first six months of the year, with significant deals for companies in cloud security, security consulting, and risk and compliance. Total M&A volume reached a record-breaking $39.5 billion across 163 transactions, according to Momentum, more than four-times the $9.8 billion spent in the first half of 2020 across 93 transactions.

Nine M&A deals in 2021 so far have been valued at greater than $1 billion, including Proofpoint’s $12.3 billion acquisition by Thoma Bravo, Auth0’s $6.4 billion acquisition by Okta, and McAfee’s $4 billion acquisition by TG.

“Through the first half of 2021, we have witnessed unprecedented strategic activity with both M&A and financing volumes at all-time highs,” said Eric McAlpine and Michael Tedesco, managing partners at Momentum Cyber. “We fully expect this trend to continue through the rest of the year and into 2022.”

Read more on Extra Crunch:

#computer-security, #computing, #cyberwarfare, #fundings-exits, #network-management, #security, #thoma-bravo, #venture-capital

Cybersecurity giants NortonLifeLock and Avast merge in $8.1B deal

US cybersecurity firm NortonLifeLock has confirmed it is acquiring British rival Avast in order to create a global consumer security powerhouse.

The agreement, which comes just weeks after both companies confirmed they were in advanced discussions regarding a possible combination of the two brands, will see Avast stockholders receive cash and shares that value the deal at $8.1 billion to $8.6 billion. That makes this merger the third-largest cybersecurity acquisition of all time, following Thoma Bravo‘s $12.3 billion takeover of Proofpoint and Broadcom’s $10.7 billion acquisition of Symantec’s enterprise business. 

NortonLifeLock, formed in 2019 as a spin-off from Symantec following the latter, says the deal will create an industry-leading consumer cyber safety business, unlock approximately $280 million of annual gross cost synergies, and dramatically expand its user numbers thanks to Avast’s 435 million-strong customer base.

“With this combination, we can strengthen our cyber safety platform and make it available to more than 500 million users,” NortonLifeLock CEO Vincent Pilette said in a statement. “This transaction is a huge step forward for consumer cyber safety and will ultimately enable us to achieve our vision to protect and empower people to live their digital lives safely.”

Avast, founded in 1988, focuses on cybersecurity software for consumers and small and medium-sized businesses and describes itself as one of the largest security companies. However, the company has not been without controversy during its near-25-year history; Avast was forced to shut down its marketing technology subsidiary Jumpshot last year after it was found to be peddling web browsing data that could be linked to individual users.

Once NortonLifeLock’s acquisition of the company is complete, Pilette will remain CEO of the new business, while Avast CEO Ondrej Vlcek will become president and join the board, the companies said.

“Our talented teams will have better opportunities to innovate and develop enhanced solutions and services, with improved capabilities from access to superior data insights,” Vlcek said. “Through our well-established brands, greater geographic diversification and access to a larger global user base, the combined businesses will be poised to access the significant growth opportunity that exists worldwide.”

The final name of the merged company has yet to be determined, but NortonLifeLock has confirmed it will be dual headquartered in the Czech Republic and Tempe, Arizona, and will seek to cut its number of employees from 5,000 workers to around 4,000 over the next two years. The combined company will be listed on the Nasdaq, rather than Avast’s current London Stock Exchange home.

The deal, which has been confirmed just weeks after NortonLifeLock bought free antivirus provider Avira for £360 million, is expected to close in mid-2022. 

#arizona, #avast, #avira, #broadcom, #ceo, #computer-security, #czech-republic, #freeware, #jumpshot, #ma, #nortonlifelock, #president, #proofpoint, #security, #software, #symantec, #thoma-bravo, #united-states

Sophos extends its spending spree with Refactr buy

Thoma Bravo-owned Sophos has announced its second takeover in as many weeks with the acquisition of Seattle-based DevSecOps startup Refactr.

Refactr was founded in 2017 and offers an automation platform that helps cybersecurity and DevOps teams to collaboratively operate. The platform, which is used by the non-profit Center for Internet Security and the U.S. Air Force’s Platform One, features a drag-and-drop low-code pipeline builder and DevOps-friendly features that encourage disparate teams to collaborate on the same agile workflow process, according to the company.

“Our mission is to enable DevSecOps to become the modern approach to automation, where cybersecurity use cases like Security Operation, Automation and Response (SOAR), Extended Detection and Response (XDR), compliance, cloud security, and Identity and Access Management (IAM) become building blocks for DevSecOps solutions,” said Michael Fraser, CEO and co-founder of Refactr.

The deal, the terms of which were not disclosed, will see Refactr’s entire team of developers and engineers join Sophos. While Sophos says it will continue to develop and offer Refactr’s DevSecOps automation platform to existing customers, it will also embed its SOAR capabilities to its own managed threat response (MTR) and XDR solutions.

“With Refactr, Sophos will fast track the integration of such advanced SOAR capabilities into our adaptive cybersecurity ecosystem, the basis for our XDR product and MTR service,” said Joe Levy, chief technology officer at Sophos.

Sophos’ acquisition of Refactr lands shortly after it announced plans to buy Braintrace, a cybersecurity startup that provides organizations visibility into suspicious network traffic patterns. Thoma Bravo completed its $3.9 billion takeover of Sophos in 2020 as the company continues to increase its reach in the cybersecurity space. Since then, the private equity firm has acquired security vendor Proofpoint for $12.3 billion and led a $225 million funding round in zero-trust unicorn Illumio.

#braintrace, #chief-technology-officer, #computing, #cybercrime, #cybersecurity-startup, #devops, #illumio, #information-technology, #ma, #proofpoint, #seattle, #security, #security-software, #sophos, #technology, #thoma-bravo, #u-s-air-force

Sophos acquires Braintrace to supercharge its threat detection capabilities

Thoma Bravo-owned Sophos has announced it’s acquiring Braintrace, a cybersecurity startup that provides organizations visibility into suspicious network traffic patterns. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Braintrace, which was founded in 2016 and has raised $10 million in funding, has developed a network detection and response (NDR) solution that helps organizations to easily inspect network traffic to identify and filter out suspicious activity. It does this using remote network packet capture (RNCAP) technology, which provides visibility into network traffic patterns, including encrypted traffic, without the need for man-in-the-middle decryption. It also provides visibility into cloud network traffic, a task that typically needs to be carried out on-site, and supports all of the major cloud providers including AWS and Microsoft Azure.

The deal will see Sophos integrate Braintrace’s NDR technology into its own adaptive cybersecurity ecosystem, which underpins all of its security products and services. The technology will also help Sophos collect data from firewalls, proxies and VPNs, allowing it to look for network traffic that contains instructions for malware like TrickBot, and attackers that misuse Cobalt Strike, as well as pre-empting other malicious traffic that might lead to ransomware attacks

Braintrace’s developers, data scientists and security analysts have joined its global Sophos’ managed threat response (MTR) and rapid response teams as part of the deal.

Commenting on the deal, which Sophos claims will make it one of the largest and fastest-growing managed detection and response (MDR) providers, the company’s CEO Joe Levy said: “We’re excited that Braintrace built this technology specifically to provide better security outcomes to their MDR customers. It’s hard to beat the effectiveness of solutions built by teams of skilled practitioners and developers to solve real-world cybersecurity problems.”

Bret Laughlin, co-founder and CEO of Braintrace, added: “We built Braintrace’s NDR technology from the ground up for detection and now, with Sophos, it will fit into a complete system to provide cross-product detection and response across a multi-vendor ecosystem.”

The deal comes a little over a year after Thoma Bravo completed its $3.9 billion takeover of Sophos, and sees the private equity firm further increasing its reach in the cybersecurity space. It acquired security vendor Proofpoint for $12.3 billion back in April, and recently led a $225 million funding round in zero trust unicorn Illumio.

#aws, #ceo, #computer-security, #computing, #cybercrime, #cybersecurity-startup, #illumio, #microsoft, #proofpoint, #security, #security-software, #sophos, #technology, #thoma-bravo

Barracuda acquires Skout Cybersecurity to enter the XDR market

Barracuda Networks has purchased Skout Cybersecurity, a New York-based channel-only provider of extended detection and response (XDR) services. 

The deal, the terms of which were not disclosed, will see the California-based cybersecurity vendor enter the fast-growing XDR market. 

As a result of the ever-increasing attack surface as businesses shift to the cloud and embrace hybrid working, 80% of security professionals now say XDR solutions — which automatically collect and correlate data from multiple security layers to improve threat detection — should be a top priority for their organization, and 68% of enterprises plan to implement XDR in 2021 and 2022, according to recent research. 

By adopting Skout’s XDR platform, along with the company’s security team, Barracuda says it will be able to offer real-time continuous security monitoring to managed service providers, or MSPs, enabling them to address threats more efficiently. Skout, an early-stage cyber-as-a-service startup that had amassed a total of $25 million in funding from RSE Ventures and ClearSky, also offers AI-powered endpoint protection, email protection services, and Office 365 monitoring through its XDR platform. 

The acquisition also continues Barracuda’s strategic M&A momentum, which includes the recent acquisition of zero trust access provider Fyde.  

“MSPs must be able to protect their customers’ end users, their devices, and the data they are accessing with these devices against increasingly sophisticated threats. To achieve this level of protection for their customers, and themselves, MSPs are transforming their businesses into “security-centric” operations,” said Brian Babineau, SVP and general manager at Barracuda MSP.

“The addition of Skout enables Barracuda’s MSP partners to deploy security solutions across their environments, connecting their data feeds into a unified, 24×7 operation for swift analysis and response.” 

The acquisition is expected to close later this month, subject to obtaining required regulatory and third-party consents, and satisfaction of other customary closing conditions. 

Previously a public company, Barracuda was taken private by private equity firm Thoma Bravo who acquired the company for $1.6 billion in November 2017. The company, which competes with Palo Alto Networks and Symantec, provides security for cloud-connected networks and applications and counts the likes of Delta Airlines, Hootsuite, and Samsung among its 200,000+ customers. 

Read more:

#anti-spam, #artificial-intelligence, #barracuda-networks, #california, #computing, #cuda, #delta-airlines, #flexera, #hootsuite, #illumio, #new-york, #palo-alto-networks, #proofpoint, #rse-ventures, #samsung, #security, #skout, #symantec, #thoma-bravo

Zero trust unicorn Illumio closes $225M Series F led by Thoma Bravo

Illumio, a self-styled zero trust unicorn, has closed a $225 million Series F funding round at a $2.75 billion valuation. 

The round was led by Thoma Bravo, which recently bought cybersecurity vendor Proofpoint by $12.3 billion, and supported by Franklin Templeton, Hamilton Lane, and Blue Owl Capital. 

The round lands more than two years after Illumio’s Series E funding round in which it raised $65 million, and fueled speculation of an impending IPO. The company’s founder, Andrew Rubin, still isn’t ready to be pressed on whether the company plans to go public, though he told TechCrunch: “If we do our job right, and if we make our customers successful, I’d like to think that would be part of our journey.”

Illumio’s latest funding round is well-timed. Not only does it come amid a huge rise in successful cyberattacks which show that some of the more traditional cybersecurity measures are no longer working, from the SolarWinds hack in early 2020 to the more recent attack on Colonial Pipeline, but it also comes just weeks after President Joe Biden issued an executive order pushing federal agencies to implement significant cybersecurity initiatives, including a zero trust architecture. 

“And just a couple of weeks ago, Anne Neuberger [deputy national security adviser for cybersecurity] put out a memo on White House stationary to all of corporate America saying we’re living through a ransomware pandemic, and here’s six things that we’re imploring you to do,” Rubin says. “One of them was to segment your network.”

Illumio focuses on protecting data centers and cloud networks through something it calls micro-segmentation, which it claims makes it easier to manage and guard against potential breaches, as well as to contain a breach if one occurs. This zero trust approach to security — a concept centered on the belief that businesses should not automatically trust anything inside or outside its perimeters — has never been more important for organizations, according to Illumio. 

“Cyber events are no longer constrained to cyber space,” says Rubin. “That’s why people are finally saying that, after 30 years of relying solely on detection to keep us safe, we cannot rely on it 100% of the time. Zero trust is now becoming the mantra.”

Illumio tells TechCrunch it will use the newly raised funds to make a “huge” investment in its field operations and channel partner network, and to invest in innovation, engineering and its product. 

The late-stage startup, which was founded in 2013 and is based in California, says more than 10% of Fortune 100 companies — including Morgan Stanley, BNP Paribas SA and Salesforce — now use its technology to protect their data centers, networks and other applications. It saw 100% international growth during the pandemic, and says it’s also broadening its customer base across more industries. 

The company has raised more now raised more $550 million from investors include Andreessen Horowitz, General Catalyst and Formation 8.

#america, #andreessen-horowitz, #anne-neuberger, #california, #colonial-pipeline, #computer-security, #computing, #cyberwarfare, #executive, #formation-8, #franklin-templeton, #funding, #general-catalyst, #information-technology, #joe-biden, #morgan-stanley, #network-management, #president, #proofpoint, #salesforce, #security, #solarwinds, #system-administration, #thoma-bravo, #unicorn, #white-house

Thoma Bravo buys cybersecurity vendor Proofpoint for $12.3B in cash

Moree M&A activity underway in the red-hot field of cybersecurity. In the latest development, private equity giant Thoma Bravo is buying Proofpoint, the SaaS security vendor, for $12.3 billion in cash.

Proofpoint is traded publicly on the Nasdaq exchange and as of its closing price on Friday, it had a market cap of $7.5 billion. This bid, which will see the company go private, is a big hike on its latest share price. The deal, if approved by shareholders, will close in Q3 of this year.

The news comes at the same time that Proofpoint had released its Q1 earnings, in which it reported revenues of $287.8 million, up 15% versus $249.8 million for the quarter a year ago — and also beating analysts’ expectations, which on average were expecting revenues of $281.6 million, according to Yahoo Finance data.

It also however reported a GAAP net loss of $45.3 million, working out to a loss per share of $0.79. That’s narrowed from a net loss of $66.8 million a year ago, but is still a net loss. Non-GAAP net income for the first quarter of 2021 was $31.5 million, or $0.49 per share, the company said.

The deal is coming in the wake of Proofpoint making a number of acquisitions over the years — its deals have included Cloudmark, Weblife, OberserveIT, and Meta Networks, all deals valued in the hundreds of millions of dollars — but also facing up against not only a growing pool of cybersecurity competitors, but also cyber threats — exacerbated in no small part by the huge shift the world has seen to cloud services, remote working and more transactions carried out online.

Proofpoint CEO Gary Steele said in a statement the acquisition to go private will allow the company to be “more agile with greater flexibility to continue investing in innovation, building on our leadership position and staying ahead of threat actors.”

Thoma Bravo, meanwhile, has been a significant acquirer of security businesses, so it will be worth watching how and if it leverages that in relation to this latest deal to acquire Proofpoint. Its acquisitions have included the likes of Sophos for $3.9 billion, a majority stake in LogRhythm, and paying $544 million for Imprivata — an asset it planned to exit last year reportedly for $2 billion until it called off the sale (it had been proceeding just as the Covid-19 pandemic was taking off). Alongside Silver Lake, Thoma Bravo tool SolarWinds private in a $4.5 billion deal before listing it again. It also attracted some controversy for selling shares just ahead of SolarWinds disclosing its major security breach but Thoma Bravo said it was unaware of the information at the time.

More to come.

#cybersecurity, #exit, #ma, #private-equity, #proofpoint, #saas-cybersecurity, #security, #tc, #thoma-bravo

Thoma Bravo to acquire RealPage property management platform for $10.2B

The busy year in M&A continued this weekend when private equity firm Thoma Bravo announced it was acquiring RealPage for $10.2B.

In RealPage, Thoma Bravo is getting a full-service property management platform with services like renter portals, site management, expense management and financial analysis for building and property owners. Orlando Bravo, Founder and a Managing Partner of Thoma Bravo sees a company that they can work with and build on its previous track record.

“RealPage’s industry leading platform is critical to the real estate ecosystem and has tremendous potential going forward,” Bravo said in a statement.

As for RealPage, company CEO Steve Winn, who will remain with the company, sees the deal as a big win for stock holders, while giving them the ability to keep investing in the product. “This will enhance our ability to focus on executing our long-term strategy and delivering even better products and services to our clients and partners,”  Winn said in a statement.

RealPage, which was founded in 1998 and went public in 2010, is a typical kind of mature platform that a private equity firm like Thoma Bravo is attracted to. It has a strong customer base with over 12,000 customers and respectable revenue, growing at a modest pace. In its most recent earnings statement, the company announced $298.1 million in revenue, up 17% year over year. That puts it on a run rate of over $1 billion.

Under the terms of the deal, Thoma Bravo will pay RealPage stockholders $88.75 in cash per share. That is a premium of more 30% over the $67.83 closing price on December 18th. The transaction is subject to standard regulatory review, and the RealPage board will have a 45-day “go shop” window to see if it can find a better price. Given the premium pricing on this deal, that isn’t likely, but it will have the opportunity to try.

#enterprise, #ma, #mergers-and-acquisitions, #private-equity, #real-estate, #realpage, #tc, #thoma-bravo

Thoma Bravo acquires Flexera for second time paying $2.85B

Thoma Bravo must really like Flexera, an IT asset management company out of Chicago. The private equity firm bought the company for the second time today. Sources told TechCrunch the price was $2.85 billion.

Technically, Thoma Bravo is getting a majority stake in the company, buying it from previous owners TA Associates and Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan Board. The firm originally bought Flexera in 2008 from Macrovision for just $200 million. It turned it around just three years later in 2011 for $1 billion profit, according to reports.

While reports last year had the company’s investors looking for $3 billion, they didn’t quite reach that mark, but it’s still a hefty profit as the company continues to change hands, giving each of its owners a substantial return on investment.

At $2.85 billion, Thoma Bravo will have a bigger challenge on its hands to make that same kind of return, but it sees a company it liked before and it still likes it, especially the management team, which to some degree at least remains intact.

“Jim [Ryan] and his team have positioned Flexera for sustained growth by focusing on the strategic challenges enterprises face with complex IT infrastructures,” Seth Boro, managing partner at Thoma Bravo said in a statement.

Ryan was pleased to see the company’s value continue to rise and to connect once again with Thoma Bravo. “This is a resounding vote of confidence in the growth Flexera has shown and the strategic initiatives we’ve undertaken to address the exponential challenges faced by organizations today,” he said in a statement.

The company was founded in 2008 and has bought 12 companies along the way including five in the last couple of years, according to Crunchbase data. The deal is expected to close in the first quarter of next subject to regulatory approvals.

#enterprise, #flexera, #it-services, #ma, #mergers-and-acquisitions, #private-equity, #thoma-bravo

Ivanti has acquired security firms MobileIron and Pulse Secure

IT security software company Ivanti has acquired two security companies: enterprise mobile security firm MobileIron, and corporate virtual network provider Pulse Secure.

In a statement on Tuesday, Ivanti said it bought MobileIron for $872 million in stock, with 91% of the shareholders voting in favor of the deal; and acquired Pulse Secure from its parent company Siris Capital Group, but did not disclose the buying price.

The deals have now closed.

Ivanti was founded in 2017 after Clearlake Capital, which owned Heat Software, bought Landesk from private equity firm Thoma Bravo, and merged the two companies to form Ivanti. The combined company, headquartered in Salt Lake City, focuses largely on enterprise IT security, including endpoint, asset, and supply chain management. Since its founding, Ivanti went on to acquire several other companies, including U.K.-based Concorde Solutions and RES Software.

If MobileIron and Pulse Secure seem familiar, both companies have faced their fair share of headlines this year after hackers began exploiting vulnerabilities found in their technologies.

Just last month, the U.K. government’s National Cyber Security Center published an alert that warned of a remotely executable bug in MobileIron, patched in June, allowing hackers to break into enterprise networks. U.S. Homeland Security’s cybersecurity advisory unit CISA said that the bug was being actively used by advanced persistent threat (APT) groups, typically associated with state-backed hackers.

Meanwhile, CISA also warned that Pulse Secure was one of several corporate VPN providers with vulnerabilities that have since become a favorite among hackers, particularly ransomware actors, who abuse the bugs to gain access to a network and deploy the file-encrypting ransomware.

#computer-security, #computing, #cybercrime, #cyberwarfare, #enterprise, #hacker, #mobile, #mobileiron, #ransomware, #res-software, #salt-lake-city, #security, #security-software, #siris-capital-group, #software, #system-administration, #thoma-bravo, #united-kingdom, #vpn

Private equity firms can offer enterprise startups a viable exit option

Four years ago, Ping Identity was at a crossroads. A venerable player in the single sign-on market, its product was not a market leader, and after 14 years and $128 million in venture capital, it needed to find a new path.

While the company had once discussed an IPO, by 2016 it began putting out feelers for buyers. Vista Equity Partners made a $600 million offer and promised to keep building the company, something that corporate buyers wouldn’t guarantee. Ping CEO and co-founder Andre Durand accepted Vista’s offer, seeing it as a way to pay off his investors and employees and exit the right way. Even better, his company wasn’t subsumed into a large entity as likely would have happened with a typical M&A transaction.

As it turned out, the IPO-or-acquisition question wasn’t an either/or proposition. Vista continued to invest in the company, using small acquisitions like UnboundID and Elastic Beam to fill in its roadmap, and Ping went public last year. The company’s experience shows that private equity offers a reasonable way for mature enterprise startups with decent but not exceptional growth — like the 100% or more venture firms tend to favor — to exit, pay off investors, reward employees and still keep building the company.

But not everyone that goes this route has a tidy outcome like Ping’s. Some companies get brought into the P/E universe where they replace the executive team, endure big layoffs or sell off profitable pieces and stop investing in the product. But the three private equity firms we spoke to — Vista Equity, Thoma Bravo and Scaleworks — all wanted to see their acquisitions succeed, even if they each go about it differently.

Viable companies with good numbers

#enterprise, #ping-identity, #scaleworks, #tc, #thoma-bravo, #vista-equity-partners

Imperva to acquire database security startup jSonar

Cybersecurity giant Imperva will acquire jSonar, a database security startup that recently landed $50 million from Goldman Sachs.

Financial terms of the deal weren’t disclosed.

The acquisition of jSonar, which provides security and compliance to databases on-premise or in the cloud, will help bolster Imperva’s data security business. As part of the deal, jSonar founder Ron Bennatan will join Imperva to lead its new data security division.

Imperva provides enterprise security, including distributed denial-of-service attacks, to more than 6,200 companies. Earlier this year the company acquired Distil Networks, adding bot protection to its security roster.

“Enterprises have shifted focus from compliance to data security while demanding lower costs and more measurable benefits,” said Imperva chief executive Pam Murphy. “This combination of two uniquely qualified trailblazers will signal a new approach to data security that puts an emphasis on usability and value with sustained and complete coverage for three initiatives organizations need to implement – security, compliance and privacy.”

Last year, private equity firm Thoma Bravo bought Imperva in a $2.1 billion deal to take the company private.

The Imperva-jSonar acquisition is expected to close by mid-October.

#computer-security, #computing, #imperva, #internet-security, #jsonar, #private, #security, #thoma-bravo