SmarterTravel sheds HopJump name, begins a new journey with $9.5M round

Travel startups continue to rake in venture capital dollars as more people become comfortable traveling amid the global pandemic. The latest is SmarterTravel, which brought in $9.5 million in Series B funding co-led by Link Ventures and Second Alpha, with existing investors also participating.

In addition to the fundraise, the company, a provider of personalized travel recommendations and targeted travel content, announced its name change from HopJump, which reflects the company’s renewed vision of providing an informative online travel experience, CEO Jordan Staab told TechCrunch.

Jordan Staab, CEO of SmarterTravel. Image Credits: SmarterTravel

SmarterTravel has 7 million email newsletter subscribers and uses proprietary artificial intelligence fixes to give customers travel information and discounts. The company writes articles on every facet of travel to inform customers, especially now with airlines, hotels and countries placing certain restrictions on travel.

“The travel consumer is changing how they absorb information,” Staab said. “The consumer is coming to us instead of visiting 20 websites before they book. Before, you might have combed through reviews, but now you just want an expert to tell you, and that is what we are.”

HopJump was started in 2018 by Staab as a digital marketing agency helping big brands with user acquisition campaigns. As it was building up to an initial public offering, Staab said the company wanted to move into building its own brand and saw an opportunity in travel, which accounts for a big market — 10% of global gross domestic product, he added.

The company went on to provide hotel discount travel prices to consumers but found it to be challenging. There are a lot of nuances and different approaches for offering four-star hotel rooms for two-star prices and bundling tactics, Staab explained.

“We fell in love with uncomplicating the process,” he said. “Consumers just want a good price from a company they trust, and that is what we set out to solve.”

In January 2020, the company launched its first product and had 60 members join in the first few months, but then the global pandemic hit. Suddenly, HopJump went from managing rapid growth to managing how the company might shut down.

Still eager to stay in travel, the company pivoted back to marketing so it could continue examining the travel industry, he said. While the company was figuring out its next move, Staab said folks at SmarterTravel were helpful to them, and when he heard that its parent company, TripAdvisor, was needing to make layoffs, and that division was going to be let go, he decided to purchase that asset along with seven others, including Airfarewatchdog, Family Vacation Critic and Oyster. The deal closed in 2020.

Lisa Dolan, managing director at Link Ventures, said that SmarterTravel’s growth was one of the drivers of her firm’s investment. When no one was traveling due to COVID, the company acquired travel companies and made it through the pandemic while other startups in the space were struggling.

She also cited its strong revenue-generating business on the email side and that it capitalized on the fact that even in the pandemic, people were conducting web searches for car rentals, things to do in certain cities and looking for vacation inspiration.

SmarterTravel is going after a U.S. travel and tourism industry valued at $580.7 billion in 2019. It is also not the only one to gain investor attention recently. For example, just over the past month companies like Thatch raised $3 million for its platform aimed at travel creators, travel tech company Hopper brought in $175 million, Wheel the World grabbed $2 million for its disability-friendly vacation planner and Elude raised $2.1 million to bring spontaneous travel back to a hard-hit industry.

Meanwhile, the funding will drive SmarterTravel’s aim to grow rapidly in terms of getting its name out there, building new travel products and hiring key staff. The company already has 50 people, but needs more, Staab said.

“Travel has had a tough couple of years, but some pockets of it are back, and we are seeing that,” he added. “In a year that should have been a bad year, our growth has been good. We were up eight times in revenue in the past 12 months. We are growing, profitable and have extra funding to lean into the growth. It is not going to be easy growth, but we are well-positioned to understand how to do it.”

 

#advertising-tech, #artificial-intelligence, #digital-marketing, #ecommerce, #funding, #hopjump, #jordan-staab, #link-ventures, #lisa-dolan, #recent-funding, #second-alpha, #smartertravel, #startups, #tc, #tourism, #travel, #travel-industry, #travel-startups, #travel-tech, #tripadvisor

#Brandneu – 5 neue Startups: Grid, Raus, Klinikheld, Everyyin, SaySom


deutsche-startups.de präsentiert heute wieder einmal einige junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind, sowie Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind. Übrigens: Noch mehr neue Startups gibt es in unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar.

Grid
Hinter Grid verbirgt sich eine “App für den Ticketverkauf, digitale Bestellungen und Payment”. Auf der Website heißt es: “Unser Ziel ist es, das Nachtleben und die Eventbranche zu digitalisieren und aufzuwerten”. Hinter dem Startup steckt insbesondere trivago-Gründer Rolf Schrömgens.

Raus
Das Berliner Startup Raus, das von Christopher Eilers, Johann Ahlers und Julian Trautwein gegründet wurde, entwickelt “zeitgemäße Rückzugsorte außerhalb der Stadt mit smarten, nachhaltigen Cabins”. “Die minimalistischen Rückzugsorte bieten eine stressfreie Pause vom Alltag”, versprechen die Gründer.

Klinikheld
Klinikheld möchte sich als Alternative zu Headhuntern und klassischen Jobbörsen in der Medizin etablieren. “Wir setzen dabei auf Technologien wie unseren KI-basierten Matching-Algorithmus, um die Jobsuche im Gesundheitswesen neu zu denken und die Ära von Post & Pray zu beenden”, so Gründer Daniel Huth.

Everyyin
Das junge Startup Everyyin, das von der Biotechnologin Nina Schmidt gegründet wurde, setzt auf “pflanzliche Nahrungsergänzunsmittel”. Zielgruppe sind “Frauen, die ihren Hormonhaushalt nach dem Absetzen synthetischer Verhütungsmittel, auf natürliche Weise wieder in Balance bringen möchten”

SaySom
SaySom möchte eine digitale und teilnehmerzentrierte Lösung bieten, um online Veranstaltungen realitätsnaher zu gestalten. “Aktuell wird SaySom hauptsächlich für Networking und für den Austausch nach großen Online-Events genutzt sowie für interne Mitarbeiter Events”, so die Macher des Stuttgarter Startups.

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über neue Startups. Alle Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der Startup-Szene. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #berlin, #brandneu, #dusseldorf, #everyyin, #femtech, #frankfurt-am-main, #grid, #hamburg, #hr, #klinikheld, #raus, #saysom, #stuttgart, #travel

Headout raises $12M, plans to hire 150+ people as domestic travel rebounds

The travel industry was one of the hardest hit by the pandemic, and startup Headout was no exception. A marketplace that let tourists make same-day bookings for tours, events and activities, the app expanded around the world after launching in 2015. Then COVID-19 hit.

But business is growing again thanks to rebounds in domestic travel and Headout claims it has grown 800% since January 2021. The company announced today it has raised $12 million led by Glade Brook Capital, which has also invested in marketplaces like Airbnb, Meituan, Uber and Instacart. The round included participation from returning investors Version One Ventures, Nexus Venture Partners, FJ Labs, 500 Startups, Haystack and Ludlow Ventures, and new investors Espresso Capital and Practical VC. 

Headout says it reached profitable EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization) in July. The new funding will be used to expand into 300 cities, product development and its product, business, marketing and operations teams. Headout plans to hire more than 150 employees around the world and is also looking for opportunities to acqui-hire travel and entertainment startups. 

This represents a massive turnaround from the beginning of the pandemic. In an email, co-founder and chief executive officer Varun Khona told TechCrunch “the pandemic was devastating as you’d imagine. Our business went from doing $250M+ to negligible scale in a matter of weeks.” 

But as travel gradually resumes, Headout identified “two massive tailwinds.” The first is an unprecedented demand for domestic travel. The second are travel experience providers who are digitizing for the first time. The company began focusing on domestic tourism in the last quarter of 2020. It’s seeing the highest demand in places with relatively high vaccination rates, like the United States, the United Kingdom, the European Union and the United Arab Emirates. 

“To win this space, we prioritized onboarding new experiences that are more diverse, local and niche to attract domestic travelers. We standardized these room and pop experience providers, upgraded their services and brought them online,” said Khona. “In conjunction, we worked hard on making Headout available in local languages—not just with machine translation but by actually ensuring we create content that is compelling and inspiring.” For example, 85% of bookings in Spain are sold in Spanish. 

When asked how Headout differentiates from other on-demand booking marketplaces, Khona said in 2018 it evolved from a traditional listings oriented marketplace, like Booking.com, to a “more managed marketplace” by standardizing, upgrading and branding experiences to ensure consistent quality. This increased conversion rates, which in turn “helped us provide more sales to our partners and hence command a higher take rate,” leading to profitable unit economics. 

 

#domestic-travel, #fundings-exits, #headout, #startups, #tc, #travel

YouTravel.Me packs up $1M to match travelers with curated small group adventures

YouTravel.Me is the latest startup to grab some venture capital dollars as the travel industry gets back on its feet amid the global pandemic.

Over the past month, we’ve seen companies like Thatch raise $3 million for its platform aimed at travel creators, travel tech company Hopper bring in $175 million, Wheel the World grab $2 million for its disability-friendly vacation planner, Elude raise $2.1 million to bring spontaneous travel back to a hard-hit industry and Wanderlog bag $1.5 million for its free travel itinerary platform.

Today YouTravel.Me joins them after raising $1 million to continue developing its online platform designed for matching like-minded travelers to small-group adventures organized by travel experts. Starta VC led the round and was joined by Liqvest.com, Mission Gate and a group of individual investors like Bas Godska, general partner at Acrobator Ventures.

Olga Bortnikova, her husband Ivan Bortnikov and Evan Mikheev founded the company in Europe three years ago. The idea for the company came to Bortnikova and Bortnikov when a trip to China went awry after a tour operator sold them a package where excursions turned out to be trips to souvenir shops. One delayed flight and other mishaps along the way, and the pair went looking for better travel experiences and a way to share them with others. When they couldn’t find what they were looking for, they decided to create it themselves.

“It’s hard for adults to make friends, but when you are on a two-week trip with just 15 people in a group, you form a deep connection, share the same language and experiences,” Bortnikova told TechCrunch. “That’s our secret sauce — we want to make a connection.”

Much like a dating app, the YouTravel.Me’s algorithms connect travelers to trips and getaways based on their interests, values and past experiences. Matched individuals can connect with each via chat or voice, work with a travel expert and complete their reservations. They also have a BeGuide offering for travel experts to do research and create itineraries.

Since 2018, CEO Bortnikova said that YouTravel.Me has become the top travel marketplace in Eastern Europe, amassing over 15,900 tours in 130 countries and attracting over 10,000 travelers and 4,200 travel experts to the platform. It was starting to branch out to international sales in 2020 when the global pandemic hit.

“Sales and tourism crashed down, and we didn’t know what to do,” she said. “We found that we have more than 4,000 travel experts on our site and they feel lonely because the pandemic was a test of the industry. We understood that and built a community and educational product for them on how to build and scale their business.”

After a McKinsey study showed that adventure travel was recovering faster than other sectors of the industry, the founders decided to go after that market, becoming part of 500 Startups at the end of 2020. As a result, YouTravel.Me doubled its revenue while still a bootstrapped company, but wanted to enter the North American market.

The new funding will be deployed into marketing in the U.S., hiring and attracting more travel experts, technology and product development and increasing gross merchandise value to $2.7 million per month by the end of 2021, Bortnikov said. The goal is to grow the number of trips to 20,000 and its travel experts to 6,000 by the beginning of next year.

Godska, also an angel investor, learned about YouTravel.Me from a mutual friend. It happened that it was the same time that he was vacationing in Sri Lanka where he was one of very few tourists. Godska was previously involved in online travel before as part of Orbitz in Europe and in Russia selling tour packages before setting up a venture capital fund.

“I was sitting there in the jungle with a bad internet connection, and it sparked my interest,” he said. “When I spoke with them, I felt the innovation and this bright vibe of how they are doing this. It instantly attracted me to help support them. The whole curated thing is a very interesting move. Independent travelers that want to travel in groups are not touched much by the traditional sector.”

 

#acrobator-ventures, #apps, #artificial-intelligence, #bas-godska, #ecommerce, #evan-mikheev, #funding, #ivan-bortnikov, #mobile, #olga-bortnikova, #online-travel, #recent-funding, #saas, #starta-vc, #startups, #tc, #tourism, #travel, #travel-industry, #travel-tech, #youtravel-me

#DealMonitor – Bain Capital investiert 700 Millionen in BBG – Vectornator sammelt 20 Millionen ein – Arive bekommt 6 Millionen


Im aktuellen #DealMonitor für den 2. September werfen wir wieder einen Blick auf die wichtigsten, spannendsten und interessantesten Investments und Exits des Tages in der DACH-Region. Alle Deals der Vortage gibt es im großen und übersichtlichen #DealMonitor-Archiv.

INVESTMENTS

Berlin Brands Group
+++ Das Privat-Equity-Unternehmen Bain Capital setzt voll und ganz auf die Berlin Brands Group (BBG). Zunächst einmal übernimmt Bain Capital den 40-Prozent-Anteil des bisherigen Investors Ardian. Im Zuge der Transaktion wird D2C-Pionier BBG mit mehr als 1 Milliarde US-Dollar bewertet und erreicht damit Unicorn-Status. Details nennt das erfolgreiche E-Commerce-Unternehmen, zudem Marken wie Klarstein, auna und gehören, nicht. Mehrere Quellen – unter anderem manager magazin und Bloomberg – nennen 1,2 Milliarden Dollar als Bewertung. Doch damit nicht genug! “Darüber hinaus hat sich BBG eine Eigen- und Fremdkapitalfinanzierung in Höhe von 700 Millionen US-Dollar gesichert, um Wachstum zu finanzieren”, heißt es in der Presseaussendung. Mehr im ausführlichen Artikel zum Unicorn-Investment

Vectornator
+++ EQT Ventures, 468 Capital und Business Angels wie Bradley Horowitz, Jonathan Rochelle, Charles Songhurst und Lutz Finger investieren – wie im Juli im Insider-Podcast berichtet – 20 Millionen US-Dollar in Vectornator. Die Post-Money-Bewertung liegt nach unseren Infos bei rund 100 Millionen Dollar. Das Berliner Unternehmen wurde 2017 von Vladimir Danila und Marc Zacherl gegründet. Mit Hilfe von Vectornator können Designer Logos, Kunstwerke, Flyer, Webseiten und vieles mehr erstellen. “With this investment, we’ll be able to take Vectornator to the next level and invest in Vectornator’s future”, teilt das Startup mit. HV Capital, Mirko Novakovic (Instana), Martin Sinner (Idealo) und Philip Magoulas investierten zuletzt rund 5 Millionen Euro in das Startup. Mehr über Vectornator

Arive
+++ Jetzt offiziell: Balderton Capital, La Famiglia und 468 Capital investieren – wie Anfang August im Insider-Podcast berichtet – 6 Millionen Euro in Arive. Die Bewertung liegt nach unseren Informationen bei rund 25 Millionen Euro (Post-Money). Das Startup aus München bringt das FastAF-Konzept nach Deutschland. Die Jungfirma, die von Linus Fries und Maximilian Reeker gegründet wurde, möchte Händlern mit Hilfe von Micro Fulfilment Centern und einer Marktplatz-App eine günstige Option für Lieferungen unter 60 Minuten anbieten. Dabei geht es gezielt nicht um Lebensmittel, sondern andere E-Commerce-Produkte. Mehr über Arive

UnitPlus
+++ Mehrere Business Angel – darunter Christian Rebernik, Katrin Stark und Lothar Eckstein investieren “einen Betrag von etwas unter 1 Million Euro” in UnitPlus – siehe FinanceFWDDas Berliner FinTech UnitPlus, das von Sebastien Segue, Fabian Mohr und Kerstin Schneider gegründet wurde, setzt auf ein Bankkonto, bei dem das vorhandene Geld in ETFs angelegt wird. Über die dazugehörige Mastercard können die Nutzer:innen dabei quasi mit ihrem angelegten Geld Shoppen gehen.

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS

Secra
+++ Das Berliner Grownup HomeToGo, eine Suchmaschine für Ferienunterkünfte, steigt bei Secra, einem Softwareanbieter in der Unterkunftsvermarktungsbranche, ein. Zunächst sichert sich das Travel-Satrtup 19 % am Unternehmen aus Sierksdorf . “Based in the Bay of Lübeck, Germany, Secra’s shareholders and managing directors, Christoph Rakel and Sebastian Krüger, lead a team of 37 developers, designers, copywriters, and marketing/communication specialists. The parties involved have agreed not to disclose the purchase price for the acquisition”, teilen die Unternehmen mit. Mehr über HomeToGo

VENTURE CAPITAL

Innovis VC
+++ In München geht die studentischen Gründer-Initiative Innovis VC an den Start. Das Motto dabei lautet: “The intersection of start-ups, students and investors is our area of impact – and where we connect, empower, and educate”. Innovis VC ist aus dem Munich Student Venture Club hervorgegangen.  “Mit ausgebildeten Analysten und starkem Netzwerk aus Universitätsnähe, arbeitet Innovis mit Partnern schon heute bei Leadsharing über eine eigens entwickelte Plattform zusammen und unterstützt bei Due Diligence sowie Market Research-Projekten”, teilen die Macher mit.

Achtung! Wir freuen uns über Tipps, Infos und Hinweise, was wir in unserem #DealMonitor alles so aufgreifen sollten. Schreibt uns eure Vorschläge entweder ganz klassisch per E-Mail oder nutzt unsere “Stille Post“, unseren Briefkasten für Insider-Infos.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): azrael74

 

#468-capital, #aktuell, #arive, #bain-capital, #berlin, #berlin-brands-group, #eqt-ventures, #fintech, #hometogo, #innovis-vc, #linearity, #munchen, #travel, #unitplus, #vectornator, #venture-capital

Thatch using $3M round to put travel creators on the map

After a difficult year, the travel industry is gaining steam again this summer and Thatch is carving out a space for itself in the sector by enabling travel creators to monetize their recommendations.

Today the company announced a $3 million Seed II round led by Wave Capital. They were joined by Freestyle VC’s Jenny Lefcourt, Netflix co-founder Marc Randolph and Airbnb’s head of data science for user trust, Kapil Gupta. It brings Thatch’s total investment to $5.2 million since the company was founded by West Askew, Abby West and Shane Farmer in 2018.

Prior to the global pandemic, the company was a subscription-based consumer travel service that matched travelers with someone who would essentially plan their trips from top to bottom. Then the industry came to a grinding halt in 2020, and the co-founders saw a bigger need to help travel creators — those who share their experiences on social media — better connect to their followers and capture value for the travel recommendations, tips and perspectives they create.

“We noticed consumers were willing to pay individuals for their time and expertise,” Abby West told TechCrunch. “Increasingly, instead of going to travel agencies, they are going to Instagram or YouTube and then DM’ing them for information. We are formalizing that relationship so that the travel creator can get paid and can then provide a better experience for the end user.”

Askew and West say travel creators drive billions of dollars of consumer travel spending. Thatch’s free mobile app provides tools for them to build their own travel-based businesses in order to curate, share and will soon be able to sell interactive travel guides and planning services. Thatch makes money when the creators do, taking a small percentage of the transactions.

While the pandemic was detrimental to the travel industry, it gave the Thatch team time to build out its app, and now it is focused on building the creator side and marketing to attract creators to the app. This is where the new funding will come in: The company intends to hire additional engineers, build out new content and launch new features for selling or earning tips on interactive guides that creators produce in the app.

Thatch app. Image Credits: Thatch

(opens in a new tab)

Among the travel creators already using the app, their audience reach is over 12 million, and the company saw a bump in usage in July, a sign that the travel industry is improving, Askew said.

Following the seed, the company will go live with the monetization and booking features so the creators can get paid, and it is looking at a strong first quarter in terms of potential bookings. The founders also want to attract larger creators and build a network for them, with Askew saying they need to be considered like the small businesses that they are and wants to help them grow.

“There is unfortunately a graveyard full of travel companies, but we are doing things differently,” West said. “We are unique with our people-to-people angle, and in this case, with people who have a built-in audience and who are trusted by that audience. That is something we don’t see in this space today.”

Wave Capital’s general partner Riley Newman said he and his other general partner, Sara Adler, both former Airbnb executives, were introduced to the company through one of Thatch’s existing investors.

His firm typically invests in marketplaces at the seed stage and the investment in Thatch marks the first into the travel sector, saying, “It is one we know well from Airbnb and a good moment to dive back into the industry.”

The travel market is poised for growth in the years ahead, especially with the pent-up demand for travel post-pandemic, Newman said. At the same time, the creator economy is on the same trajectory to democratize travel planning similar to the way he said Airbnb did, and that was a compelling vision for Wave Capital.

“Travel planning has been around for a long time, but this is an interesting new angle,” Newman added. “We look at the founding team and see Abby and West having complementary backgrounds and energy. This is a good moment for travel given their approach, and their concept for attacking the market is right and needed.”

#abby-west, #advertising-tech, #airbnb, #apps, #ecommerce, #freestyle-vc, #funding, #jenny-lefcourt, #kapil-gupta, #marc-randolph, #recent-funding, #riley-newman, #sara-adler, #shane-farmer, #social-media, #startups, #tc, #thatch, #travel, #travel-industry, #travel-recommendations, #vacation-rental, #wave-capital, #west-askew

#Interview – “Wir hätten schneller agieren und ausprobieren können”


Acht Jahre nach dem Start steht das Münchner Startup Mileways, über das Nutzer:innen bisher unabhängig von Airlines Meilen sammeln konnten, vor einem Neustart. “Meilen werden hauptsächlich gesammelt, um einen Status bei einer Airline zu erreichen und wenn, dann nur für Flüge oder Flug-Upgrades genutzt. Die Meilen im Miles-Shop einzulösen ist wirtschaftlich nicht interessant. Das mussten wir auf die harte Tour lernen”, sagt Gründer Alexander Lueck.

Nun positioniert sich die Jungfirma als eine Fluginfodienst. “Flying can and should be comfortable. Instead, in times like these, we travel with uncertainty and anxiety. We think we can do better. We have identified the problems faced by many air travelers and translated them into a modern, contemporary user experience, finally creating the a flight tracker that will meet all your needs”, heißt es auf der Website.  Vom ursprünglichen Mileways-Team ist nur noch Lueck an Bord. Zum neuen Gründerteam gehören nun aber noch Gernot Poetsch, Marton Salomvary und Yannick Lung.

Im Interview mit deutsche-startups.de spricht Mileways-Macher Lueck über alten Code, Flugdaten und Szenarien.

Wie würdest Du Deiner Großmutter Mileways erklären?
Oma, Mileways hilft dir zu sehen, wann ich wo hinfliege und liefert mir alle relevanten Informationen zu meinen Flügen am schnellsten und übersichtlichsten.

Beim Start vor einigen Jahren lag der Fokus noch auf dem Sammeln von Meilen. Wie kam es zu dieser Veränderung?
Leider hat es nicht so viele Leute interessiert Meilen unabhängig der Airlines zu sammeln und diese bei unseren Partner einzulösen. Obwohl wir mit Airbnb, Uber, damals noch DriveNow, Sixt, Amazon usw. recht coole Partner für uns begeistern und akquirieren konnten. Meilen werden nämlich hauptsächlich gesammelt, um einen Status bei einer Airline zu erreichen und wenn, dann nur für Flüge oder Flug-Upgrades genutzt. Die Meilen im Miles-Shop einzulösen ist wirtschaftlich nicht interessant. Das mussten wir auf die harte Tour lernen.

Was war die größte Herausforderung, was die größte Schwierigkeit, beim Wandel zum jetzigen Konzept?
Die Motivation und Ausdauer über so eine lange Zeit zu behalten. Aber auch den Schritt zu gehen und das Produkt noch einmal von Null zu entwickeln, da wir vom alten Code nur noch wenig bis gar nichts verwenden konnten.

Der erste Start von Mileways ist jetzt acht Jahre her. Was habt ihr in dieser langen Zeit sonst so gemacht?
In den acht Jahren ist tatsächlich sehr viel passiert. Aus dem ehemaligen Gründerteam hat sich, klassisch, jeder für sich selbst neu orientiert und beispielsweise neue Unternehmungen gestartet oder ist zu anderen Unternehmen als Mitarbeiter gewechselt. Mileways haben wir aber gemeinsam tatsächlich nie abgeschaltet, da wir immer noch organisches Wachstum hatten und die Burn-Rate überschaubar war. Als dann Flighttrack 5 von Expedia übernommen wurde und sich viele User beschwert halten, dass es keinen vernünftigen Flighttracker mehr auf dem Markt gibt, kam die Idee zum Pivot. Interessanterweise hat die Zeit uns eher geholfen, da die Flugdaten mittlerweile sehr viel besser geworden sind. Damals war man noch happy, wenn man eine Flugverspätung korrekt angezeigt hat, heute kann man eigentlich immer sehr genau sagen wo sich das Flugzeug befindet vom Taxiing bis hin zur exakten Flugroute. Und auch die Verfügbarkeit des mobilen Internets in Europa begünstigt unser Produkt. Denn so können wir nach einer Landung nützliche Informationen wie zum Bespiel das Anschluss-Gate oder das Baggage Belt mühelos zur Verfügung stellen.

Welchen Tipp gibst du anderen Gründern, die vor einem Pivot stehen?
Es gibt drei Szenarien, die einem als Gründer widerfahren können. Das beste Szenario: Schneller Erfolg. Das zweitbeste Szenario: Schneller Misserfolg. Das schlimmste Szenario: Langsamer Misserfolg. Leider haben auch wir viel zu lange mit der Entscheidung des Pivots gewartet. Ich kann daher jedem Gründer raten, die relevanten KPIs immer im Blick zu haben und sehr kritisch und ehrlich mit sich selbst zu sein. Wenn etwas nicht läuft, nicht all zu lange warten und die Strategie anpassen. Auch wenn es bedeutet sich um 180 Grad zu drehen oder den Laden komplett zu schließen.

Blicke bitte noch einmal zurück: Was ist in den vergangenen Jahren sonst noch so richtig schief gegangen?
Ganz klar, das wir die Entscheidung betreffend Pivot und neuem Fokus der App viel zu lange herausgezögert haben. Wir hätten schneller agieren und ausprobieren können.

Und wo hat Ihr bisher alles richtig gemacht?
Ich würde sagen, dass wir den Customer Support immer ganz gut bewältigt haben. Wir haben uns stets gut um das Bugfixing und die Anliegen und Wünsche unsere User gekümmert. Glückliche User, die unsere App nutzen, machen auch uns als Team glücklich. Deshalb haben wir auch mit der alten Version eigentlich eine recht gute Bewertung im deutschsprachigen App-Store. Auch das neue Team haben wir zusammen ganz gut auf die Beine gestellt. Wir ergänzen uns alle in unseren Fähigkeiten und haben die nötigen Skills um ein erstklassiges Produkt auf dem Markt zu etablieren. Mittlerweile haben wir auch viel Erfahrung im Flight-Tracking Bereich sammeln können, was enorm wichtig ist. Einer der Team-Mitglieder hat sogar seine Bachelorarbeit über Mileways geschrieben, so sehr brennen wir für unser Produkt.

Die Corona-Krise traf die Startup-Szene zuletzt teilweise hart. Wie habt ihr die Auswirkungen gespürt?
Wir hatten Glück im Unglück. Tatsächlich war die Flugindustrie ja mit am härtesten betroffen. Die Airlines sind als erste in die Krise rein und kommen als letzte wieder raus. Wir haben jedoch genau in dieser Zeit die neue Version entwickelt und hoffen jetzt mit unserem Launch ein gutes Timing zu erwischen, um mit dem steigenden Flugaufkommen zu wachsen.

Wo steht Mileways in einem Jahr?
Als Travel-Startup während der Corona-Pandemie ist es natürlich sehr schwer bis gar unmöglich eine Prognose abzugeben. Unser Ziel ist es, uns als App langfristig im Travel-Bereich unter den top Travel-Apps zu etablieren. Wir haben spannende Features in der Pipeline und hoffen das es diesmal um einiges besser läuft als beim ersten Anlauf.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Mileways

#aktuell, #interview, #mileways, #munchen, #pivot, #travel

Hopper raises $170M at $3.5B+ valuation as travel surges and its fintech tools help offset variant concerns

Travel tech company Hopper has raised a $170 million Series G, the company said today. Astute observers may recognize the number — that’s the same amount it raised in a Series F round that closed earlier this year. These are indeed new funds, however, bringing its total raised to date to nearly $600 million, with the company now valued at over $3.5 billion. This latest round arrives as Hopper is seeing impressive growth as travel starts to surge on the recent downswings in cases in North America following large-scale Covid-19 vaccination campaigns.

Hopper says that its revenue is on track to surge 330% vs. last year, which is hardly surprising given that 2020 saw the depths of the pandemic and a widespread screeching halt to the bustling global travel industry. The more impressive stat is that Hopper’s revenue is already up 100% vs. its last pre-pandemic quarter, indicating the tough choices and aggressive re-prioritization of its products and business it underwent as a result of the pandemic are working well.

Of course, there’s a looming spectre threatening the overall narrative of a travel industry bounce-back: Delta and other Covid-19 variants, which are currently driving another wave of resurgence of the disease in North America. I asked Hopper CEO and co-founder Fred Lalonde about Delta’s impact on Hopper’s business so far.

“Currently, we have not seen an incremental impact of the Delta variant on Hopper’s domestic bookings,” he said. “In recent weeks, we have seen higher domestic bookings and lower international bookings on Hopper, as travelers look to stay closer to home. Since Hopper’s customer base is predominantly younger, leisure travelers and the majority of our bookings have been domestic throughout the pandemic, our domestic bookings still remain stable. ”

Regardless of the impact on the nature of bookings, though, Lalonde notes that Hopper’s line of fintech products (something the company increasingly sees as its key differentiation) are in increasing demand as elements of uncertainty like the impact of the Delta variant enter into customer travel planning considerations.

We are, however, seeing increased demand for our flexible booking products in recent weeks,” Lalonde said. “In fact, purchases of Hopper’s Cancel for Any Reason are up 33% from early July, Change for Any Reason is up 9.3% from early July, and Rebooking Guarantee is up 12% in the past month, as travelers look for more flexibility and protection over their trips.”

These AI-powered tools offer protections against pricing fluctuations and volatility, no hassle rebooking even up to the day prior to your trip, cross-airline rebooking for missed connections and more.

Image Credits: Hopper

Hopper is also looking to use these newly-raised funds to further reinforce its business through increased customer support hiring (it’s already scaled the team by 200% and rolled out a suit of new automated tools that Lalonde says resolves 60% of its inbound requests “instantly”). The company intends to bring on 500 new employees in the near future, with 300 of those dedicated to customer service roles.

Another area of interest for Hopper with this funding is acqui-hiring: Lalonde says specific targets include teams focused on “travel, data science or engineering-heavy startups to help introduce new product offerings and fuel its international expansion.” The company’s product expansion goals include opening up home rentals on the platform, and its global ambitions include expanding to Europe and Asia.

When it raised its Series F in March, Hopper also announced that it would be white labeling its booking products through Hopper Cloud, and partnering first with Capital One to launch a travel booking portal for its cardholders, which is on track to debut later this year. Since then, Hopper has also revealed that it will be working with Amadeus to roll out its fintech products to any travel provider that wants to use them, including airlines, online travel agencies and more.

Covid-19 was obviously a shock to the system across all industries and almost every aspect of daily life, but the travel industry likely experienced some of the most dramatic upheaval. Hopper’s ability to attract significant pools of new funding in the wake of the pandemic, including this new round led by GPI Capital, reflect the impressive flexibility and speed with which it’s been able to shape an entirely new kind of digital travel company that anticipates and even thrives on volatility.

#funding, #hopper, #tc, #travel

Airbnb, DoorDash report earnings as COVID threatens to slow the IRL economy (again)

Home-stay giant Airbnb and on-demand delivery concern DoorDash reported their quarterly results today after the bell.

Both companies were heavily impacted by the onset of COVID-19. Airbnb saw its revenues collapse in 2020 during early lockdowns, leading the company to raise expensive capital and batten its hatches. The company recovered as the year continued, leading to its eventual IPO.

DoorDash, in contrast, managed a simply incredible 2020 as folks stayed home and ordered in. Given that we got both reports on the same day, let’s digest ’em and see how COVID has — and may — impact their results.

Airbnb’s Q2

In the second quarter, Airbnb reported revenues of $1.3 billion, which compares favorably with its Q2 2020 result of $335 million and its 2019 Q2 revenue total of $1.21 billion. In percentage terms, Airbnb’s revenue grew 299% from its Q2 2020 level and 10% from what the company managed during the same period of 2019.

Analysts had expected $1.23 billion in revenue for the period.

Airbnb lost $68 million in the quarter when counting all costs. The company’s adjusted EBITDA, a heavily modified profit metric, came to $217 million in the quarter. Cash from operations in Q2 2021 was $791 million. Looking ahead, here’s what Airbnb had to say regarding its revenue outlook:

[We] expect Q3 2021 revenue to be our strongest quarterly revenue on record and to deliver the highest Adjusted EBITDA dollars and margin ever.

How did the market digest Airbnb’s better-than-expected growth, rising adjusted profit, falling net losses, massive cash generation and expectations of record Q3 revenue? By bidding its shares lower. Airbnb is off around 4.5% in after-hours trading.

Confused? Investors may be worried about the following note from the company, also from the guidance section of its earnings letter:

In the near term, we anticipate that the impact of COVID-19 and the introduction and spread of new variants of the virus, including the Delta variant, will continue to affect overall travel behavior, including how often and when guests book and cancel. As a result, year-over-year comparisons for Nights and Experiences Booked and GBV will continue to be more volatile and non-linear.

While Q3 2021 is looking great for Airbnb, it appears that its future growth could be lumpy or delayed thanks to the ongoing pandemic. There are public indicators pointing to travel rates declining, which could impact Airbnb.

The company’s Q2 results and Q3 anticipations are impressive when compared to where Airbnb was a year ago. But that doesn’t mean that it is entirely out of the COVID woods.

DoorDash’s Q2

Despite generally lower COVID friction in its market during Q2 2021, DoorDash managed to set records for orders and the value of those orders. In the three-month period concluding June 30, 2021, the on-demand food delivery company turned $10.46 billion in order value (marketplace GOV) into $1.24 billion in total revenue. The marketplace GOV number was 70% greater than the Q2 2020 result, while DoorDash’s revenues expanded by 83%.

Investors had expected the company to post $1.08 billion in total revenues, so DoorDash handily bested expectations.

How profitable was DoorDash during the quarter? DoorDash was unprofitable overall, with a net loss of $102 million. In adjusted EBITDA terms, DoorDash saw $113 million in profit during Q2 2021. That’s not too bad, given that Uber cannot manage the same feat with its own food delivery business. DoorDash’s net income was worse than what it managed in Q2 2020, while its adjusted EBITDA improved.

Shares of DoorDash are off around 3.5% in after-hours trading.

Why? It’s not entirely clear. DoorDash said that it expects “Q3 Marketplace GOV to be in a range of $9.3 billion to $9.8 billion, with Q3 Adjusted EBITDA in a range of $0 million to $100 million.” Sure, that’s down a smidgen from its Q2 GOV number, but investors were anticipating DoorDash to post less revenue in Q3 than Q2, so you would think that GOV expectations were also more modest.

Is COVID the answer? Mentions of COVID-19 in the company’s earnings document tend to deal with trailing results and historical efforts to provide relief to restaurants that use DoorDash for orders or delivery. So, there’s not a lot of juice to squeeze there. However, the company did say the following toward the end of its report:

We believe the broad secular shift toward omni-channel local commerce remains nascent. However, the scale and fragmentation of local commerce suggests the problems to be solved will get more difficult, coordination between internal and external stakeholders will become more complex, and vectors for competitive threats will increase. At the same time, we expect the pace of consumer behavioral shifts to slow compared to the extraordinary pace of change in recent quarters.

Simplifying that for us: DoorDash expects slower growth in the future, a more complex business climate and rising competition as it enters new markets. That’s not a mix that would make any investor more excited, we don’t think.

#airbnb, #doordash, #earnings, #food-delivery, #on-demand-food-delivery, #travel

#DealMonitor – Planted sammelt 19 Millionen ein – Ardian übernimmt YT Industries – Home kauft Zenmieter


Im aktuellen #DealMonitor für den 3. August werfen wir wieder einen Blick auf die wichtigsten, spannendsten und interessantesten Investments und Exits des Tages in der DACH-Region. Alle Deals der Vortage gibt es im großen und übersichtlichen #DealMonitor-Archiv.

INVESTMENTS

Planted
+++ Vorwerk Ventures, Gullspang Re:food, Movendo Capital, Good Seed Ventures, Joyance, ACE & Company und Be8 Ventures investieren 19 Millionen Schweizer Franken in Planted. Das im Juli 2019 von Pascal Bieri, Lukas Böni, Christoph Jenny und Eric Stirnemann gegründete Spin-off der ETH Zürich vertreibt rein pflanzliche Fleischprodukte. Vorwerk Ventures und Blue Horizon Ventures, der Schweizer Fußball-Star Yann Sommer sowie die Altinvestoren Stephan Schmidheiny, Good Seed Ventures, die Gaydoul Group, die ETH Zürich Foundation und Joyance Partners investierten erst im März 2021 rund 17 Millionen Schweizer Franken in Planted.

expertlead
+++ Acton Capital Partners, Seek, Rocket Internet und Kreos Capital investieren 9,5 Millionen Euro in expertlead. Das Berliner HR-Startup, das 2018 von Alexander Schlomberg und Arne Hosemann gestartet wurde, positioniert sich als Vermittlungsplattform für Freiberufler aus der Tech-Branche. Alle Kandidaten werden dabei von Expertlead extrem auf Herz und Nieren, also ihre Fähigkeiten geprüft. “The raised money will be invested into the development and expansion of new and existing tools”, teilt das Unternehmen mit. Mehr über expertlead

gitti
+++ Der deutsche-französische Geldgeber Xange, Martin Avetisyan und Alexander Frolov von Target Global investieren gemeinsam mit den Altinvestoren 6,9 Millionen Euro in gitti – siehe Gründerszene. Grazia Equity und btov Partners investierten Ende 2020 bereits 3 Millionen Euro in das Berliner Nagellack-Startup. Zuvor investierten Mirko Caspar, Christoph Honnefelder und Caren Genthner in die Jungfirma, die von Jennifer Baum-Minkus gegründet wurde. In der Gründer-Show “Die Höhle der Löwen” interessierten sich zuletzt Judith Williams und Dagmar Wöhrl für das Startup. Der Deal über 350.000 Euro platzte aber nach der Show. Mehr über gitti

VoteBase
+++ Fußball-Profi Manuel Neuer, Rose Bikes-Macher Marcus Diekmann und Shopware-Gründer Stefan Hammann investieren in VoteBase. Das Startup aus München entwickelt eine Wahl-App auf Blockchain-Technologie, die speziell für Wahlen mit extrem hohen Sicherheitsanforderungen, wie eine Bundestagswahl, gedacht ist. Das Unternehmen wurde von Payman Supervizer und Maximilian Pieters gegründet. Die Investoren sichern sich nun 10 % an der Jungfirma.

Signature Products
+++ Im Rahmes des Förderprogramm BIPL-Innovation fließt eine sechsstellige Summe – rund 800.000 Euro – in das Cannabis-Startup Signature Products. Das 2019 von Florian Pichlmaier und Tobias Bühler in Pforzheim gegründete Unternehmen bietet unterschiedliche Hanfprodukte – vom Rohstoffhandel über die Extraktion bis hin zu Endkonsumentenprodukte. 20 Mitarbeiter:innen wirken derzeit für Signature Products.

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS

Zenmieter
+++ Das Berliner PropTech Home, das Vermieter dabei unterstützt ihre Immobilien zu verwalten bzw zu vermieten, übernimmt das PropTech Zenmieter. “Zenmieters Wohnungsbestand wird von Home übernommen. Die Marke bleibt nicht bestehen”, teilt das Unternehmen mit. Zenmieter, ein Startup des Venture Builders Stryber, positioniert sich als “Zukunft des Vermietens”. Vermieter können ihre Wohnungen direkt an Zenmieter vermieten. Das Münchener Startup, 2020 gegründet, und war bisher in München, Augsburg, Nürnberg, Fürth und Erlangen aktiv. Home wurde 2016 von Moritz von Hase und Thilo Konzok gegründet. Kunden von Home vermieten die Wohnung an das Startup und bekommen dafür jeden Monate die Miete direkt von Home bezahlt. Capnamic Ventures, EQT Ventures. Redalpine Venture Partners und FJ Labs investierten zuletzt rund 11 Millionen Euro in Home. Mehr über Home

YT Industries
+++ Die Investmentgesellschaft Ardian übernimmt die Mehrheit am D2C-Unternehmen YT Industries. “The management team, led by former Amazon manager Sam Nicols who joined the company in 2020, and the founder and CVO Markus Flossmann, supported by Jacob Fatih’s business incubator Crealize, will focus on building out the company’s product portfolio, whilst simultaneously bringing YT’s brand and customer experience to the next level”, teilt das Unternehmen mit. Die Mountainbike-Kultmarke, 2008 von Markus Flossmann und Jacob Fatih gegründet,  bietet derzeit 40 verschiedene Modellen an sowie passende Bekleidung und Zubehör. Der Umsatz lag zuletzt bei rund 100 Millionen.

 TravelLocal.com / trip.me
+++ Die Travel-Startups TravelLocal.com aus Bristol und trip.me aus Berlin fusionieren. “Durch die Fusion entsteht einer der größten Online-Marktplätze für personalisierte Reisen im englisch- und deutschsprachigen Raum. Angesichts des erwarteten Nachfragebooms nach der Pandemie sehen die Managementteams und Investoren ein enormes Potential in der Zusammenlegung verbunden mit einer deutlichen Steigerung der Marktanteile”, teilen die Unternehmen mit. Im Zuge der Fusion investieren Active Partners und Gresham House Ventures 2,9 Millionen Euro in das Unternehmen. Insgesamt flossen bisher 15,2 Millionen in das Unternehmen. trip.me wurde 2013 von André Kiwitz, Matthias Woppmann, Stefan Richter und Yngrid Arnold gegründet. Die “Plattform für maßgeschneiderte Reisen im DACH-Markt” wurde unter anderem von der Recruit Group aus Japan unterstützt.

Achtung! Wir freuen uns über Tipps, Infos und Hinweise, was wir in unserem #DealMonitor alles so aufgreifen sollten. Schreibt uns eure Vorschläge entweder ganz klassisch per E-Mail oder nutzt unsere “Stille Post“, unseren Briefkasten für Insider-Infos.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): azrael74

#ace-company, #acton-capital-partners, #aktuell, #ardian, #be8-ventures, #beauty, #berlin, #d2c, #expertlead, #food, #gitti, #good-seed-ventures, #gullspang-refood, #home, #hr, #joyance, #kreos-capital, #manuel-neuer, #movendo-capital, #pforzheim, #planted, #proptech, #rocket-internet, #signature-products, #stryber, #travel, #travellocal-com, #trip-me, #venture-capital, #vorwerk-ventures, #votebase, #xange, #yt-industries, #zenmieter, #zurich

#Brandneu – 6 neue Startups: AlpacaCamping, Hype 1000, Hawk AI, Vaira, one minute for nature, Purpose


deutsche-startups.de präsentiert heute wieder einmal einige junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind, sowie Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind. Übrigens: Noch mehr neue Startups gibt es in unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar.

AlpacaCamping
Über AlpacaCamping finden Campingfans Stellplätze in der Natur. Dazu schreiben die Gründer: “Wir bieten Stellflächen in der Natur und ganz legal von unabhängigen Anbietern”. Ins Leben gerufen wurde die Jungfirma von Christopher Feuerlein, Dominik Quambusch, Steffen Drew und Simon Illner. AlpacaCamping war zuletzt auch in unserem Pitch-Podcast zu Gast.

Hype 1000
Das junge Unternehmen Hype 1000 entwickelt “sichere, kundenorientierte und benutzerfreundliche Audio- und Voice-Lösungen”. Die Gründer schreiben dazu: “Denn wir sind davon überzeugt, dass jede Organisation mit einer eigenen Stimme kommunizieren sollte”.

Hawk AI
Das Münchner Fintech Hawk AI bietet eine “Softwarelösung zur automatisierten Erkennung von Verdachtsfällen von Finanzkriminalität” an. Das Team schreibt dazu: “Die Lösung reduziert die Fehlalarmquote im Vergleich zu herkömmlichen AML-Lösungen drastisch”.

Vaira
Vaira aus Paderborn bietet eine Plattform für die automatisierte Abwicklung von Baumaßnahmen in der Energiebranche. Ein Feature ist etwa die digitale Vermessung via Smartphone. Daten sollen so direkt von der Baustelle in die Plattform geladen werden können.

one minute for nature
Das junge Startup one minute for nature zeigt kurze Videos zum Thema Nachhaltigkeit, die 15 Sekunden Werbung eines umweltbewussten Unternehmens enthalten. “Mit den Einnahmen unterstützen wir Aufforstungsprojekte in Madagaskar”, teilt die Gründer mit.

Purpose
Purpose aus Berlin positioniert sich als “Career Development und Coaching Plattform”.Das Startup setzt dabei, um Nutzer und Karrieren zusammenzubringten auf eine Analyse, die Psychometrie und KI miteinander verbindet. Purpose empfiehlt dann Ausbildungs-, Job- und Studienangebote

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über neue Startups. Alle Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der Startup-Szene. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

 

#aktuell, #alpacacamping, #audio, #berlin, #brandneu, #camping, #contech, #fintech, #hawk-ai, #hr, #hype-1000, #koln, #munchen, #munster, #oberschwarzach, #one-minute-for-nature, #paderborn, #purpose, #travel, #vaira, #voice

#DealMonitor – Choco sammelt 100 Millionen ein – Cliplister und DemoUp fusionieren


Im aktuellen #DealMonitor für den 20. Juli werfen wir wieder einen Blick auf die wichtigsten, spannendsten und interessantesten Investments und Exits des Tages in der DACH-Region. Alle Deals der Vortage gibt es im großen und übersichtlichen #DealMonitor-Archiv.

INVESTMENTS

Choco 
+++ Jetzt offiziell: Left Lane Capital, Insight Partners sowie die Altgesellschafter Coatue und Bessemer Venture Partners investieren – wie erwartet – 100 Millionen Dollar in Choco. Insgesamt flossen nun sch0n 171,5 Millionen Dollar in das Unternehmen. Die Bewertung liegt bei 600 Millionen Dollar. Das Berliner Startup, das 2018 von Julian Hammer und Rogério da Silva Yokomizo und Daniel Khachab gegründet wurde, bietet Gastronomen eine App an, mit der diese Waren bei Großhändlern bestellen können. Mitte Juli haben wir im Insider-Podcast über das bevorstehende Investment berichtet

Raus
+++ Speedinvest investiert gemeinsam mit Angel-Investoren wie  Julian Stiefel und Julian Weselek (Tourlane), Zazume-Gründer Jeroen Merchiers sowie Urs Rahne eine siebenstellige Summe in Raus. Das Berliner Startup, das 2021 von den Schulfreunden Christopher Eilers, Johann Ahlers und Julian Trautwein gegründet wurde, entwickelt “zeitgemäße Rückzugsorte außerhalb der Stadt mit smarten, nachhaltigen Cabins”. “Das frische Kapital investiert Raus vor allem in die Produkt- und Technologieentwicklung sowie die Skalierung, sodass die ersten Standorte bereits 2021 in Deutschland eröffnen”, teilt das Unternehmen mit.

Brajuu 
+++ Mehrere nicht genannte Business Angels investieren in Brajuu. Das Startup möchte den BH-Kauf revolutionieren und bietet Frauen eine Online-Unterwäsche-Beratung an. Im Zuge der Pre-Seed-Investmentrunde gründete das Unternehmen eine neue Gesellschaft und verlegte seinen Standort von Köln nach Münster. Brajuu wird von Melanie Wagenfort und Marco Preuß geführt.

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS

Cliplister / DemoUp 
+++ Die beiden Unternehmen DemoUp (gegründet 2014) und Cliplister (gegründet 2007, die beide Hersteller und Händler beim Erstellen, Verwalten und Ausspielen von Content-Formate unterstützen, schließen sich zusammen. “Unter dem Doppelnamen DemoUp Cliplister bündeln beide Unternehmen ihre internationalen Kundenportfolien sowie das technologische Setup zur europaweit führenden Plattform im Bereich Product Experience Management”, teilen die Unternehmen mit. Für die zusammengeschlossene Firma arbeiten in Berlin und Kiel rund 100 Mitarbeiter:innen. Nach eigenen Angaben ist DemoUp Cliplister in 25 Ländern aktiv. Zu den Investoren des Unternehmens gehören unter anderem Rheingau Ventures, Born2grow und Mountain Partners sowie Björn Jopen und Fabian Bohne.

VENTURE CAPITAL

Speedinvest 
+++ Der Frühphasen-Geldgeber Speedinvest legt mit Speedinvest x Fund 2 einen weiteren Fonds für Marketplaces & Consumer-Themen in Höhe von 60 Millionen Euro auf. Geplant waren ursprünglich 50 Millionen. “Neben den beiden Anker-Investoren Styria Digital Marketplaces und Russmedia Equity Partners sind an dem Fonds über ein Dutzend Marketplaces-Unternehmer und -Führungskräfte beteiligt, unter anderem Jörg Gerbig, COO von JustEatTakeAway, und die Gründer von Ankorstore und Vinted”, teilt der Venture Capitalist mit.

Achtung! Wir freuen uns über Tipps, Infos und Hinweise, was wir in unserem #DealMonitor alles so aufgreifen sollten. Schreibt uns eure Vorschläge entweder ganz klassisch per E-Mail oder nutzt unsere “Stille Post“, unseren Briefkasten für Insider-Infos.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): azrael74

#aktuell, #berlin, #brajuu, #cliplister, #demoup, #kiel, #munster, #raus, #speedinvest, #travel, #venture-capital

#Brandneu – 5 neue Startups: Hyrise Academy, solasolution, HiddenGyms, wyldr, BuroYou


deutsche-startups.de präsentiert heute wieder einmal einige junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind, sowie Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind. Übrigens: Noch mehr neue Startups gibt es in unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar.

Hyrise Academy
Hyrise Academy, das von Michael Land, Alvaro Rojas und Dominic Blank in Berlin gegründet wurde, positioniert sich als “Online-Akademie, die talentierte Karriere- und Quereinsteiger findet, über ein Bootcamp für digitale Jobprofile ausbildet und anschließend bei wachsenden Digitalunternehmen platziert”. Die Hyrise Academy war zuletzt auch in unserem Pitch-Podcast zu Gast.

solasolution
Mit solasolution startet Seriengründer Sascha Nitsche ein weiteres Unternehmen. Die Jungfirma aus Essen positioniert sich als “Supply Side Service Provider für touristische Leistungsträger” solasolution bietet unter anderem ein “multioptionales Dialog Center” und einen Concierge-Service für mobile Reiseberater an.

HiddenGyms
Die Mannheimer Jungfirma HiddenGyms “bringt private Fitnessstudios mitten in die Stadt”. Der Zugang erfolgt über ein elektronisches Türschloss. So können “Fitnesstrainer und Trainierende trainieren – alleine, mit Freunden, Familie oder Kunden. Das ganze stundenweise und ohne Vertragsbindung”.

wyldr
Das Berliner Startup wyldr setzt auf “gesunde und umweltfreundliche Ernährung”. Die Hauptstädter liefern “Bio-Rezepte inklusive der passenden Premium-Zutaten” direkt zu seinen Nutzer:innen. Alle Lebensmittel kommen dabei “ohne sperrige Box oder unnötigen Verpackungsmüll” aus.

BuroYou
Das Berliner PropTech BuroYou, das vom Seriengründer Thomas Gawlitta gegründet wurde, positioniert sich als “Mieter Club für Unternehmer”. BuroYou dreht den Anmietprozess dabei um. Mieter müssen ein “dediziertes Anmietprofil” anlegen und Vermieter können “nach einem positiven Match passende Büroflächen anbieten”.

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über neue Startups. Alle Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der Startup-Szene. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #berlin, #brandneu, #buroyou, #essen, #food, #hiddengyms, #hyrise-academy, #mannheim, #proptech, #solasolution, #travel, #wyldr

#Brandneu – 6 neue Startups: Yababa, Angle Audio, Boyoca, pryntad, Earnest, Unchained Robotics


deutsche-startups.de präsentiert heute wieder einmal einige junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind, sowie Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind. Übrigens: Noch mehr neue Startups gibt es in unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar.

Yababa
Hinter Yababa verbirgt sich ein Lieferservice für orientalische Lebensmittel und Gerichte. Das Berliner Startup von Atlantic Labs angeschoben, verspricht seinen Kundinnen und Kunden “niedrige Preise” und eine “Lieferung am gleichen Tag”. Geführt wird der orientalische Supermarkt von Ralph Hage.

Angle Audio
Das Startup Angle Audio, das von Matthias D. Strodtkoetter, Valerius Huonder und Matthias Karg gegründet wurde, positioniert sich als Clubhouse-Alternative. Die Jungfirma aus Zürich bietet zudem aber auch Funktionen wie eine Bildschirmfreigabe und eine Text-Chat Funktion an.

Boyoca
Über Boyoca kann jeder Campingplätze online buchen. Die Betreiber von Campingplätzen möchte das Kölner Team “mit kuratierten Services unterstützen, die ihnen dabei helfen, ihre alltäglichen Herausforderungen in einer dynamischen, digitalen Welt erfolgreich zu meistern”.

pryntad
Hinter pryntad verbirgt sich ein Marktplatz für Printanzeigen. Das Hamburger Startup, das von Anja Visscher, Martin Kaltwasser und Philipp Wolde gegründet wurde, verspricht dabei eine “unkomplizierte Buchung – ganz ohne Preisliste”. Über 300 Zeitungen mit mehr als 1.700 Ausgaben bietet die Jungfirma derzeit an.

Earnest
Earnest bietet Nutzer:innen Tipps und Tricks sowie, Analysen rund um nachhaltiges Leben. Dabei setzt das Projekt aus dem Hause uptodate Ventures auf Edutainment. “Die App sensibilisiert, inspiriert und motiviert zur Eigeninitiative – nicht mit erhobenem Zeigefinger und Informationsüberfluss”, lautet dabei die Vorgabe.

Unchained Robotics
Das Paderborner Startup Unchained Robotics entwickelt eine auf künstlicher Intelligenz basierte Steuerung von Robotern für die Elektronik-Fertigung. “Somit eröffnet man den Weg zur kostspieligen Automatisierung für jede Fabrik in Deutschland und Europa”, teilt das Unternehmen zum Konzept mit. Unchained Robotics war zuletzt auch in unserem Pitch-Podcast zu Gast.

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über neue Startups. Alle Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der Startup-Szene. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#adtech, #aktuell, #angle-audio, #audio, #berlin, #boyoca, #brandneu, #camping, #climatetech, #earnest, #food, #hamburg, #koln, #munchen, #paderborn, #pryntad, #travel, #unchained-robotics, #uptodate-ventures, #yababa, #zurich

#DealMonitor – Tencent investiert in Scalable Capital – peaq bekommt 2,5 Millionen – Flow Lab sammelt 1 Million ein


Im aktuellen #DealMonitor für den 9. Juni werfen wir wieder einen Blick auf die wichtigsten, spannendsten und interessantesten Investments und Exits des Tages in der DACH-Region. Alle Deals der Vortage gibt es im großen und übersichtlichen #DealMonitor-Archiv.

INVESTMENTS

Scalable Capital
+++ Jetzt offiziell! Der chinesische Techkonzern Tencent und Altinvestoren investieren 180 Millionen US-Dollar in Scalable Capital. Der digitale Vermögensverwalter, der 2014 von Florian Prucker, Erik Podzuweit, Patrick Pöschl, Adam French und Stefan Mittnik gegründet wurde, sammelt nun schon 320 Millionen Dollar ein. “Das neue Kapital wird verwendet, um das europäische Wachstum von Scalable Capital zu beschleunigen und den Aufbau eines ganzheitlichen digitalen Vermögensverwaltungs- und Brokerage-Angebots fortzusetzen”, teilt die Jungfirma mit. Im Zuge der aktuellen Investmentrunde steigt das Unternehmen aus München zum Unicorn auf. Die Bewertung liegt bei 1,4 Milliarden Dollar (Post-Money). 230 Mitarbeiter:innen arbeiten derzeit für Scalable Capital. Zuletzt sammelte das der Neobroker und Robo-Advisor 50 Millionen Euro ein – unter anderem von Hedosophia, BlackRock, HV Capital und Tengelmann Ventures. Im Insider-Podcast haben wir bereits am Montag über das Investment berichtet. Mehr über Scalable Capital

peaq
+++ Die Beteiligungsgesellschaft Scherzer & Co., Werner Geissler, ehemaliger Vice-Chairman von Procter & Gamble, und Meteoric VC investieren 2,5 Millionen Euro in peaq. Das Startup aus Berlin, das 2017 von Till Wendler, Julia Poenitzsch, Max Thake und Leonard Dorlöchter gegründet wurde,  möchte Unternehmen dabei helfen, Prozesse zu automatisieren und Kosten einzusparen. Dafür setzt das peaq-Team auf sogenannte Distributed Ledger Technology. “Unsere dezentrale Infrastruktur transformiert das Internet der Dinge in die hyper-vernetzte Economy of Things”, verspricht das Startup. Mehrere Angel-Investoren investierten zuvor bereits 750.000 Euro in peaq.

Flow Lab
Der Berliner Kapitalgeber IBB Ventures, APX, der Frühphaseninvestor von Axel Springer und Porsche, sowie einige Business Angels investieren 1 Million Euro in das Berliner Startup Flow Lab. Die Jungfirma, die 2018 von Jonas Vossler, David Jacob und Peter Schwarz gegründet wurde, entwickelt eine individuelle Mental-Trainings-App. ”Mit Hilfe von geführten Audiosessions lernst du Schritt für Schritt, auch unter Stress produktive Höchstleistungen zu erzielen”, heißt es auf der Website. APX, die Unternehmensberatung IIC Solutions und drei Business Angels investierten zuvor bereits 285.000 Euro in Flow Lab.

Travelcircus
+++ Die Altinvestoren investieren eine siebenstellige Summe in Travelcircus. Das Startup, das von 2014 von Nils Brosch, Bastian Böckenhüser, Mathias Zeitler und Robert Anders gegründet wurde, kümmert sich um “handverlesene Kurzreisepakete im DACH-Raum”. In der Vergangenheit investierten Geldgeber wie Airbridge Equity Partners, Tengelmann Ventures, MairDumont Ventures, IBB Ventures und Howzat Growth rund 7,5 Millionen Euro in die Jungfirma. 70 Mitarbeiter:innen wirkten derzeit für Travelcircus.

VENTURE CAPITAL

Emerge Accelerator
+++ Die Investoren SoftBank und Speedinvest starten mit Emerge Accelerator ein Programm für “mehr Diversität in der europäischen Tech-Branche”. Der Emerge Accelerator richtet sich gezielt an “Startups, die mindestens eine/n Gründer*in haben, der oder die sich als People of Color, weiblich, LGBTQ+, Mensch mit Behinderung oder Geflüchtete*r identifiziert”. Zu den Unterstützer:innen des Emerge Accelerators gehören Cherry Ventures, Breega, firstminute Capital und Kindred. In den USA investierte SoftBank im Rahmen der ersten Emerge-Reihe insgesamt 5 Millionen US-Dollar in 13 Startups.

Achtung! Wir freuen uns über Tipps, Infos und Hinweise, was wir in unserem #DealMonitor alles so aufgreifen sollten. Schreibt uns eure Vorschläge entweder ganz klassisch per E-Mail oder nutzt unsere “Stille Post“, unseren Briefkasten für Insider-Infos.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): azrael74

#accelerator, #aktuell, #apx, #berlin, #emerge-accelerator, #fintech, #flow-lab, #ibb-ventures, #munchen, #neobroker, #peaq, #robo-advisor, #scalable-capital, #softbank, #speedinvest, #tencent, #travel, #travelcircus, #venture-capital

#DHDL – Lambus: Fast ein Silicon-Valley-Startup


Ein gutes Team, ordentlich Risikobereitschaft, aber keine Unternehmer. Viel Potenzial, aber keine genaue Planung. Kaum Umsatz, aber gute Nutzerzahlen. Und ein noch nicht ganz ausgereiftes Geschäftsmodell, aber eine hohe Bewertung. Viele deutsche Gründer denken hier wahrscheinlich eher “USA”. Und tatsächlich hat der Gründer von Lambus vier Jahre im Silicon Valley gearbeitet. Lassen sie zwei so unterschiedliche Startup-Kulturen in Einklang bringen?

Die Idee: eine App, die Reiseplanung, Buchungen, alle Unterlagen und die Abrechnungen intelligent vereint und für den Nutzer erheblich vereinfacht. Besonders Gruppenreisen sollen so mit erheblich weniger Aufwand zu planen sein. Stolz erzählen die Gründer Hans Knöchel und Anja Niehoff, dass sie bereits knapp 60.000 Nutzer gewinnen konnten.

Die Zahl lässt die Investoren aufhorchen, und Carsten Maschmeyer zeigt sofort, dass er sich mit dieser Art von Geschäftsmodell auskennt, denn er stellt direkt mehrere Fragen in einer: Ob diese Nutzer sich auch registriert hätten, oder was genau hier gezählt wurde? Wie viele Reisen schon in der App von den Nutzern erstellt würden und was und ob monetarisiert würde?

Tatsächlich stecken hierin noch viel mehr Aspekte, als sich auf den ersten Blick vermuten lässt. Natürlich ist die Frage nach den registrierten Nutzern zunächst wörtlich zu nehmen, der Löwe wollte sicherlich an dieser Stelle auch genau diese Information haben. Aber es gibt noch ein paar “Nebeneffekte”: Stellt ein Investor diese Frage, will er oft auch sehen, ob Gründer bereit sind, die Begriffe ein wenig zu vermischen, um vielleicht besser dazustehen. Oder sogar ihre Zahlen nicht wirklich im Griff haben. Denn Gründer geben gerne einmal Downloads als Nutzer an, was aber einfach nicht korrekt ist. Denn es gibt immer auch direkte App-Löschungen nach dem Download. Selbst wenn diese sehr gering ausfallen sollten, fallen hier also schon potenzielle User weg und man muss mit einer Conversion Rate planen und arbeiten. GründerInnen sollten hier also gegenüber Investoren immer 100%ig korrekt und transparent sein und sich vorher mit den gebräuchlichen Begrifflichkeiten auseinander gesetzt haben.

Doch die Gründer können dies bestätigen, die Nutzer, von denen sie sprachen, sind allesamt registriert. Außerdem haben sie insgesamt ca. 50.000 Reisen über die App erstellt. Carsten bemerkt, dass das ja praktisch eine Reise pro Nutzer ist. Er rechnet hier also praktisch schon mit einer Art genormten Conversion Rate zur Reiseplanung. Im Schnitt nutzt also fast jeder registrierte Nutzer die App auch tatsächlich, was auf eine hohe Aktivitätsrate hindeutet. Zwar müsste man sich streng genommen noch anschauen, wie genau die Verteilung aussieht, das heißt, ob es z.B. viele Nutzer gibt, die mehrere Reisen anlegen und dafür auch recht viele, die gar nicht erst anfangen zu planen. Doch bei einem Startup, was es noch nicht so lange gibt, kann man vorerst eine recht ausgeglichene Verteilung unterstellen.

Solche Aktivitätskennzahlen sind allerdings überaus wichtig für die Bewertung des Geschäftsmodells: Nutzen die Menschen die App auch wirklich, kommt das Konzept an? Gute Aktivitätskennzahlen können ein erster Schritt Richtung Proof of Concept sein, auch wenn man noch viel mehr über seine Nutzer herausfinden muss, um ein funktionierendes Geschäftsmodell zu basteln.

Denn bei der Frage nach der Monetarisierung wird es etwas schwächer bei Lambus, erst wenige Partner sind angebunden, die ihre Dienstleistungen anbieten und dafür eine Art Vermittlungsprovision zahlen. Zwar ist man hier in weiteren Gesprächen, die Gründer wollen sich aber nicht auf Umsatzprognosen festlegen, auch wenn die Löwen mehrmals nachfragen und Georg Kofler dann sogar aussteigt.

Doch die Gründer haben es sowieso vor allem auf Carsten Maschmeyer abgesehen, wie sie wenig später zugeben.

Allerdings ist der Großinvestor skeptisch: ein Reise-Startup mitten in der Pandemie und dann auch noch mit einer recht hohen Bewertung? Die Monetarisierung scheint hier noch in weiter Ferne zu sein, doch die Gründer pochen auf ihr gutes Nutzer-Wachstum und eben die Aktivitätsrate.

Durchaus ein eher amerikanischer Ansatz: Groß denken, erstmal viele Nutzer gewinnen. Doch den deutschen Boden haben die Gründer nicht unter den Füßen verloren: Sie haben bereits Partner und sind in der weiteren Akquise, erklären außerdem ihre Pläne für eine bezahlte Pro-Version. Im Gegenzug zu vielen Silicon-Valley-Startups in einer solchen Phase ist das Geschäftsmodell also prinzipiell klar, es geht nur noch um Details.

Carsten Maschmeyer lässt sich schließlich überzeugen, er findet die Gründer gut, auch wenn er sie noch nicht ganz als Unternehmer wahrnimmt.

Doch er will 25 statt 15 % von den Gründern haben plus einen “Corona-Meilenstein”, nach dessen Erreichen erst die zweite Hälfte ausbezahlt wird. Eine harte Verhandlung beginnt, schließlich einigt man sich bei 18 %. Was vielleicht weniger Übermut und Einfluss des amerikanischen Gründer-Selbstbewusstseins ist, als das Wissen, dass es mit einem solchen Modell noch weitere Runden geben wird, soll es erfolgreich sein. Das lange Feilschen wurde am Ende aber nicht belohnt, der Deal platzte nach der Show.

Tipp: Alles über die Vox-Gründer-Show gibt es in unserer DHDL-Rubrik. Die jeweiligen Deals und Nicht-Deals gibt es hier: “Die Höhle der Löwen (9. Staffel)“,”Die Höhle der Löwen (8. Staffel)“, “Die Höhle der Löwen (7. Staffel)“,”Die Höhle der Löwen” (6. Staffel)“,“Die Höhle der Löwen” (5. Staffel)“, “Die Höhle der Löwen (4. Staffel)“, “Die Höhle der Löwen (3. Staffel)“, “Die Höhle der Löwen (2. Staffel)“, “Die Höhle der Löwen (1. Staffel)“.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben):  TVNOW / Bernd-Michael Maurer

#aktuell, #carsten-maschmeyer, #die-hohle-der-lowen, #lambus, #travel

#Zahlencheck – HomeToGo wächst auf 73,3 Millionen Umsatz – Verlust: 22,3 Millionen


Das Berliner Grownup HomeToGo legt neue Unternehmenszahlen vor – und zwar den Jahresabschluss für das Geschäftsjahr 2019. Die Suchmaschine für Ferienunterkünfte, die 2014 von Wolfgang Heigl, Patrick Andrä und Nils Regge gegründet wurde, erwirtschaftete im Geschäftsjahr 2019 (Konzernabschluss) einen Umsatz in Höhe von 73,3 Millionen Euro. Ende Dezember 2019 war das Unternehmen an zehn europäischen Gesellschaften beteiligt – unter anderem Casamundo, Wimdu und Tripping.

2019 kümmerte sich das HomeToGo-Team vor allem um die Integration von Casamundo: “Das Jahr war auch geprägt von der Integration der im Jahr 2018 erworbenen Casamundo GmbH in den Konzern, vor allem auf operativer Ebene, um weitere Synergieeffekte zu heben. Da die Casamundo GmbH ebenso wie die Muttergesellschaft als Aggregator im gleichen Markt agiert, wurden die interne Abwicklung verschlankt und Prozesse optimiert”.

Der Umsatz bei der HomeToGo GmbH (HTG) stieg 2019 um 13 % von 52,7 auf 59,6 Millionen. “Maßgeblich getrieben wird der Umsatz durch die zunehmende Popularität der Marke HTG, einer steigenden Kundenbindung und dem somit effizienteren Einsatz der Marketinginstrumente”, teilt das Unternehmen mit. Der Jahresfehlbetrag auf Konzernebene lag 2019 bei üppigen 22,3 Millionen Euro. Der Jahrefehlbetrag der HomeToGo GmbH lag dabei bei 18,6 Millionen (Vorjahr: 17,8 Millionen).

“Insgesamt ist das Jahr 2019 sowohl für die HTG als auch für den Konzern überaus positiv verlaufen. Die Webseiten unserer Gruppen-Unternehmen verzeichneten insgesamt ca. 296 Mio. Besuche nach ca. 182 Mio. Aufrufen im Vorjahr. Das Buchungsvolumen bei angeschlossenen Buchungsportalen ist konzernweit um über 24 % angewachsen, was sich auch im Umsatzwachstum der HomeToGo GmbH widerspiegelt. Umsatzseitig wurde damit die Prognose der HTG und der Gruppe für 2019 voll bestätigt. Der Jahresfehlbetrag fiel aufgrund der reduzierten Marketingaufwendungen unter Berücksichtigung des Einmaleffekts aus den Abschreibungen auf Finanzanlagen geringer aus als erwartet”, schreibt das Unternehmen im Jahresabschluss.

Auch für das Corona-Jahr zeigte sich das HomeToGo-Team zuletzt zuversichtlich: “Für das Geschäftsjahr 2020 erwarten wir für die Gesellschaft und den HTG-Konzern trotz der Corona-Pandemie eine leichte Zunahme beim Umsatz und Buchungsvolumen im einstelligen Prozentbereich. Aufgrund der eingeleiteten (Spar-)Maßnahmen im Zuge der Corona-Krise und der sich abzeichnenden beschleunigten positiven Nachfrage nach Ferienhausurlaub aufgrund ebendieser erwarten wir sowohl auf Gesellschaftsebene als auch auf Konzernebene einen moderaten Rückgang des Jahresfehlbetrages im einstelligen Prozentbereich”. Bei den Spar-Maßnahmen griff das Unternehmen unter anderem auf Kurzarbeit zurück.

Zudem sicherte sich die Jungfirma weiteres Kapital: “Um die Liquidität in diesem volatilen Umfeld langfristig abzusichern, hat die HomeToGo GmbH ein Wandeldarlehen von ihren Gesellschaftern (7. August 2020) sowie einen Kredit von ihrer Hausbank (12. August 2020) aufgenommen. Das kombinierte Gesamtvolumen dieser Finanzierungsmaßnahmen liegt deutlich über T€ 30.000”. Zum Hintergrund: In den vergangenen Jahren flossen 150 Millionen US-Dollar in HomeToGo – unter anderem von Insight Venture Partners, Lakestar, Acton Capital Partners und DN Capital. Der Konzernbilanzverlust lag Ende 2019 bei rund 66,6 Millionen Euro.

Fakten aus dem Jahresabschluss 2019

* Insgesamt ist das Jahr 2019 sowohl für die HTG als auch für den Konzern überaus positiv verlaufen. Die Webseiten unserer Gruppen-Unternehmen verzeichneten insgesamt ca. 296 Mio. Besuche nach ca. 182 Mio. Aufrufen im Vorjahr. Das Buchungsvolumen bei angeschlossenen Buchungsportalen ist konzernweit um über 24 % angewachsen, was sich auch im Umsatzwachstum der HomeToGo GmbH widerspiegelt. Umsatzseitig wurde damit die Prognose der HTG und der Gruppe für 2019 voll bestätigt. Auch die angestrebte höhere Marketingeffizienz wurde voll erreicht. Der Materialaufwand der HTG, der aufgrund des Geschäftsmodells vor allem Marketingaufwendungen beinhaltet, ist bei gleichzeitigem Umsatzzuwachs um über 4 % niedriger ausgefallen. Dadurch konnte erstmals in der Geschichte der HTG ein positiver Deckungsbeitrag in Höhe von T€ 4.829 realisiert werden (Vorjahr T€ -4.415). Das Verhältnis von Umsatz zu Materialaufwand lag bei der HTG mit knapp 109 % in der Zielzone (auf Konzernebene über 123 %). Der Jahresfehlbetrag fiel aufgrund der reduzierten Marketingaufwendungen unter Berücksichtigung des Einmaleffekts aus den Abschreibungen auf Finanzanlagen geringer aus als erwartet.
* Der Gesamtumsatz der HTG-Gruppe lag im Geschäftsjahr 2019 bei T€ 73.343 und wurde im Wesentlichen durch die Vermittlung von Ferienunterkünften sowie durch Werbeumsätze erzielt.
* Die Finanzlage der HTG-Gruppe ist positiv. Zum 31. Dezember 2019 verfügte der Konzern über liquide Mittel in Höhe von T€ 10.972, das Eigenkapital lag bei T€ 47.292 und die Eigenkapitalquote damit bei 64,9 %. Die konzernweiten Verbindlichkeiten aus Lieferungen und Leistungen lagen bei T€ 5.541 und betragen 7,6 % der Bilanzsumme.
* Zusammenfassend ist für 2019 festzustellen, dass das Ergebnis der HTG und des HTG-Konzerns innerhalb der Erwartung lag und die Gesamtlage des Unternehmens insgesamt positiv einzustufen ist. Die Vermögens- und Finanzlage ist als geordnet und stabil anzusehen.
* Für das Geschäftsjahr 2020 erwarten wir für die Gesellschaft und den HTG-Konzern trotz der Corona-Pandemie eine leichte Zunahme beim Umsatz und Buchungsvolumen im einstelligen Prozentbereich. Bei den Marketingaufwendungen (Materialaufwand) rechnen wir mit einer gegenüber der Umsatzerwartung unterproportionalen Entwicklung und einem dementsprechenden leichten Anstieg des Deckungsbeitrags im niedrigen einstelligen Prozentbereich. Aufgrund der eingeleiteten (Spar-)Maßnahmen im Zuge der Corona-Krise und der sich abzeichnenden beschleunigten positiven Nachfrage nach Ferienhausurlaub aufgrund ebendieser erwarten wir sowohl auf Gesellschaftsebene als auch auf Konzernebene einen moderaten Rückgang des Jahresfehlbetrages im einstelligen Prozentbereich.
* Um die Liquidität in diesem volatilen Umfeld langfristig abzusichern, hat die HomeToGo GmbH ein Wandeldarlehen von ihren Gesellschaftern (7. August 2020) sowie einen Kredit von ihrer Hausbank (12. August 2020) aufgenommen. Das kombinierte Gesamtvolumen dieser Finanzierungsmaßnahmen liegt deutlich über T€ 30.000.

  • Die durchschnittliche Anzahl der Mitarbeiter im Geschäftsjahr betrug: 305

HomeToGo im Zahlencheck

2019: 73,3 Millionen Euro (Umsatz); 22,3 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag) *
2019: 59,6 Millionen Euro (Umsatz); 18,6 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)
2018: 
52,7 Millionen Euro (Umsatz); 17,8 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)
2017
: 36,6 Millionen Euro (Umsatz); 13,4 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)
2016: 11,9 Millionen Euro (Umsatz); 8,2 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)
2015: 4,2 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)

* Konzernabschlusss

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): HomeToGo

#aktuell, #berlin, #hometogo, #reloaded, #travel, #zahlencheck

#Zahlencheck – Comtravo wächst vor der Corona-Pandemie auf 36,8 Millionen Umsatz


Das 2015 gegründet Berliner Startup Comtravo, eine Buchungsplattform für Geschäftsreisen, legt neue Unternehmenszahlen vor – und zwar den Jahresabschluss für das Geschäftsjahr 2019. Bekannte Investoren wie M12, Endeit Capital, Creandum, Project A und btov Partners investierten in den vergangenen Jahren mehr als 35 Millionen Euro in das Unternehmen. Das viele Geld wollte das Comtravo-Team insbesondere nutzen, um seine Technologie weiterzuentwickeln.

Im Geschäftsjahr 2019 erwirtschaftete das Unternehmen einen Umsatz in Höhe von 36,8 Millionen Euro. Im Vorjahr waren es gerade einmal 16,6 Millionen (+ 121%). “Vor allem in 2019 konnte durch die erhöhte Investition in die Kundenakquise, die Anzahl der Kunden um 95% von 329 auf 640 erhöht werden. Ein weiterer finanzieller Leistungsindikator ist der durchschnittliche Warenkorb der Buchungen. Der durchschnittliche Warenkorb ist leicht von 220 Euro im Jahr 2018 auf 213 Euro im Berichtsjahr 2019 gesunken”, schreibt das Unternehmen dazu.

Der Jahresfehlbetrag stieg 2019 von  3,9 Millionen auf 6,2 Millionen. “Das Ergebnis ist maßgeblich gekennzeichnet von Investitionen im Bereich F&E sowie Sales und Marketing”, teilt das Travel-Grownup mit. Insgesamt kostete der Aufbau von Comtravo bis Ende 2o19 rund 14,7 Millionen. Der Großteil davon entfällt auf die Jahre 2018 und 2019. Besonders der Personalaufwand stieg bei Comtravo zuletzt – von 3,3 auf knapp 6 Millionen. Comtravo beschäftigte im Geschäftsjahr 2019 durchschnittlich 122 Arbeitnehmer:innen (Vorjahr: 70).

Das Corona-Jahr warf das Unternehmen komplett aus der Bahn – so viel ist schon jetzt klar. “Wir glauben aber weiterhin mit einem attraktiven und wettbewerbsfähigen Produkt ausgestattet zu sein, dass auf die Bedürfnisse kleiner und mittelständischer Unternehmen abgestimmt ist. Der konsequente starke Ausbau unseres Vertriebs- und Serviceteams und die Verbesserung unserer Vertriebsstrukturen gepaart mit niedriger Fluktuation gewährleisten eine positive Entwicklung der Gesellschaft. Wir planen mit einem Umsatzrückgang in 2020 aufgrund der Pandemie von rund 60 %. Durch bereits eingeleitete Kosteneinsparungen, die sowohl Personal- als auch Sachaufwendungen betreffen, gehen wir weiterhin von einem negativen Jahresergebnis aus”.

Das Unternehmen sieht aber auch Chancen: “Der Geschäftsreisesektor steht vor großen Herausforderungen. Die digitalen Anforderungen an das Reisemanagement werden immer höher und Buchungsprozesse müssen effizienter gestaltet werden, um dem Kostendruck gerecht zu werden, der durch Corona nochmals verstärkt wurde. Da viele kleine Unternehmen in der Geschäftsreisebranche jedoch nicht über das benötigte Kapital verfügen, ist ein Zusammenschluss eine sinnvolle und sehr nachhaltige Alternative. Für Comtravo bieten sich hierdurch Möglichkeiten, noch stärker zu wachsen”.

Fakten aus dem Jahresabschluss 2019

* Die Comtravo GmbH konnte die Umsätze 2019 um 121% im Vergleich zum Vorjahr TEUR 16.627 auf TEUR 36.759 steigern. Die Verteilung der Umsätze auf die einzelnen Sparten ist auf dem Niveau des Vorjahres.
* Als finanzielle Leistungsindikatoren werden insbesondere die Entwicklung Anzahl der Kunden gesehen. Vor allem in 2019 konnte durch die erhöhte Investition in die Kundenakquise, die Anzahl der Kunden um 95% von 329 auf 640 erhöht werden. Ein weiterer finanzieller Leistungsindikator ist der durchschnittliche Warenkorb der Buchungen. Der durchschnittliche Warenkorb ist leicht von 220 Euro im Jahr 2018 auf 213 Euro im Berichtsjahr 2019 gesunken. Dies ist i. W. auf die Verringerung des Flug-Anteils zurückzuführen.
* Die Comtravo weist 2019 einen Jahresfehlbetrag von TEUR 6.237 (i. Vj. TEUR 3.930) aus. Das Ergebnis ist maßgeblich gekennzeichnet von Investitionen im Bereich F&E sowie Sales und Marketing.
* Die Comtravo hat im Jahr 2019 eine Finanzierungsrunde i. H. v. rund 25 Mio. Euro (inkl. Wandelschuldverschreibung) durchgeführt. Damit ist nicht von einer Überschuldung bzw. einem Liquiditätsengpass auszugehen.
* Der konsequente starke Ausbau unseres Vertriebs- und Serviceteams und die Verbesserung unserer Vertriebsstrukturen gepaart mit niedriger Fluktuation gewährleisten eine positive Entwicklung der Gesellschaft. Wir planen mit einem Umsatzrückgang in 2020 aufgrund der Pandemie von rd. 60%. Durch bereits eingeleitete Kosteneinsparungen, die sowohl Personal- als auch Sachaufwendungen betreffen, gehen wir weiterhin von einem negativen Jahresergebnis aus.
* Die Comtravo GmbH beschäftigte im Geschäftsjahr 2019 durchschnittlich 122 Arbeitnehmer (i. Vj.70 Arbeitnehmer).

Comtravo im Zahlencheck

2019: 36,8 Millionen Euro (Umsatz); 6,2 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)
2018: 16,6 Millionen Euro (Umsatz); 3,9 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)
2017: 2,7 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)
2016: 1,7 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)
2015: 151.490 Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #comtravo, #reloaded, #travel, #zahlencheck

#DealMonitor – Holidu bekommt 37 Millionen – Paua Ventures investiert in Xolo – MeinAuto Group sagt IPO ab


Im aktuellen #DealMonitor für den 12. Mai werfen wir wieder einen Blick auf die wichtigsten, spannendsten und interessantesten Investments und Exits des Tages in der DACH-Region. Alle Deals der Vortage gibt es im großen und übersichtlichen #DealMonitor-Archiv.

INVESTMENTS

Holidu 
+++ 83North und die Altinvestoren Prime Ventures, EQT Ventures, Coparion, Senovo, Kees Koolen, Lios Ventures sowie Chris Hitchen investieren 37 Millionen Euro in Holidu. “Claret Capital  schließt sich der Finanzierungsrunde an und stellt sowohl Eigenkapital als auch Venture Debt zur Verfügung”, teilt das Unternehmen weiter mit. Das Startup, das 2014 von den Brüdern Johannes und Michael Siebers gegründet wurde, sammelte zuletzt 40 Millionen ein. Insgesamt flossen nun schon mehr als 100 Millionen Euro in die Ferienhausplattform. Das frische Kapital unter anderem in den Ausbau des Software- und Serviceanbieters Bookiply fließen. Mit der Software Bookiply hilft das Unternehmen Ferienhausvermietern, “mit weniger Aufwand mehr Buchungen zu bekommen”. Nach eigenen Angaben wirtschaftet Holidu seit 2020 “operativ profitabel”. Mehr über Holidu

KidsCircle.io
+++ Die Angel-Investorinnen Nicole Herzog, Carole Ackermann, Daniela Hinrichs und Corinne Rohner investieren in KidsCircle.io. Beim jungen Unternehmen, das 2020 von Sabine Wildemann und Felix Kosel gegründet wurde, sollen Kinder im Alter von vier bis elf Jahren erlebnisreich betreut werden. Das Berliner Startup setzt auf Kinderbetreuung in Gruppen mit ausgebildeten Coaches. Eltern können ihre Kinder nach der Kita direkt in eine “Kids Circle-Station” bringen, dort können sie dann beispielsweise bei Kochkursen reinschnuppern oder sich im Modern Dance ausprobieren.

Xolo
+++ Der Berliner Geldgeber Paua Ventures und Berliner Angel-Investoren wie Christian Vollmann, Johannes Schaback, Robert M. Maier, Lukas Brosseder, Oliver Roskopf und Just Beyer investieren in Xolo. Das Berliner Unternehmen entwickelt einen Drucker, der auf den sogenannten volumetrischen 3D-Druck setzt. Im Gegensatz zum schichtweisen Aufbau können beim Xolographie-Verfahren komplette Objekt projiziert und ausgehärtet werden. Das Unternehmen wird von Dirk Radzinski geführt. Mehr im Insider-Podcast #EXKLUSIV

EXITS

Lampemesteren
+++Die lampenwelt.de-Mutter Luqom Group übernimmt den dänischen Leuchten -Shop Lampemesteren. “Durch diesen Zukauf setzt das Unternehmen das starke Wachstum der vergangenen Jahre fort und ist jetzt in 27 europäischen Ländern mit über 60 Online-Shops aktiv”, teilt die Luqom Group mit.

STOCK MARKET

MeinAuto Group
+++ Der Online-Autohändler MeinAuto Group sagt seinen geplanten IPO kurzfristig ab. “Grund dafür sind die derzeit ungünstigen Marktbedingungen für wachstumsstarke Unternehmen. Die Bücher waren bereits am ersten Tag des Bookbuildings gefüllt und einschließlich der Mehrzuteilungsoption in voller Höhe überzeichnet”, teilt das Unternehmen mit. Im Rahmen des geplanten Angebots wollte das Unternehmen einen Bruttoerlös von mindestens 150 Millionen Euro erzielen. Die Bewertung sollte bei rund 2 Milliarden Euro liegen. Der Finanzinvestor Hg baute die MeinAuto Group 2018 aus dem Kölner Startup MeinAuto.de, Mobility Concept, der Flottenleasing-Tochter der Hypovereinsbank (HVB) und Athletic Sport Sponsoring zusammen. Das Unternehmen erwirtschaftete 2020 einen bereinigten Umsatz in Höhe von 212 Millionen Euro und ein bereinigtes EBITDA von 38 Millionen Euro.

Achtung! Wir freuen uns über Tipps, Infos und Hinweise, was wir in unserem #DealMonitor alles so aufgreifen sollten. Schreibt uns eure Vorschläge entweder ganz klassisch per E-Mail oder nutzt unsere “Stille Post“, unseren Briefkasten für Insider-Infos.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): azrael74

#83north, #aktuell, #berlin, #holidu, #ipo, #kidscircle-io, #lampenwelt-de, #luqom-group, #meinauto-group, #munchen, #paua-ventures, #travel, #venture-capital, #xolo

Holidu books $45M after growing its vacation rentals business ~50% YoY during COVID-19

Vacation rental startup Holidu has tucked $45 million in Series D funding into its suitcase — bringing its total raised since being founded back in 2014 to more than $120M.

The latest funding round is led by 83North with participation from existing investors Prime Ventures, EQT ventures, Coparion, Senovo, Kees Koolen, Lios Ventures and Chris Hitchen. Also participating, with both equity and debt, is Claret Capital (formerly Harbert European Growth Capital).

The financing will be ploughed into product development; doubling the size of the tech team; and on building out partnerships to keep expanding supply, Holidu said.

While the global pandemic clearly hasn’t been kind to much of the travel industry, the Munich-headquartered startup has been able to benefit from coronavirus-induced shifts in traveller behavior.

People who may have booked city breaks or hotels pre-COVID-19 are turning to private holiday accommodation in greater numbers than before — so they can feel safer about going on holiday and perhaps enjoy more space and fresh air than they’ve had at home during coronavirus lockdowns.

Having flexible cancelation options is also now clearly front of mind for travellers — and Holidu credits moving quickly to build in flexible cancellation and payment solutions with helping fuel its growth during the pandemic.

Holidu’s meta search engine compares listings on sites like Airbnb, Booking.com, HomeAway and Vrbo and provides holidaymakers with tools to zoom in on relevant rentals — offering granular filters for property amenities; property type; and distances to the beach/lake etc.

It can also be used to search only for listings with a free cancelation policy.

“We see that many travellers have chosen vacation rentals in rural destinations over hotels or cities,” confirms CEO and co-founder Johannes Siebers. “In spite of this shift in preference, the overall European vacation rental market declined in 2020 due to the strong travel restrictions in many months. Holidu managed to grow against this trend by responding very quickly to the increased demand for domestic lodging and for flexible cancellation options.”

The startup saw year-over-year growth of circa 50% in 2020 — and greater than 2x growth in its contribution margin, per Siebers.

“[That] enabled us to become profitable with our search business,” he adds. “Revenues for 2021 are still difficult to forecast due to the uncertain pandemic and political outlook but we expect a significantly higher growth rate compared to 2020.”

Holidu is active in 21 countries with its search engine — which now combines more than 15M vacation rental offers from over a thousand travel sites and property managers. In July 2020 alone, it said that more than 27M travellers used the product.

Its search engine business has a mixed business model, with Holidu taking a commission per click with a minority of its partners and earning a commission for each booking generated with the majority.

In another strand of its business, under the Bookiply brand, it works directly with property owners to help them maximize bookings via a software-and-service solution — offering to take the digital management strain in exchange for a cut of (successful) bookings.

Back in 2019 it was managing 5,000 properties via Bookiply. Now Siebers says it’s “on track” to grow to more than 10,000 properties by the end of this year.

Bookiply has become the largest supplier of vacation rentals in what it described as “important leisure destinations” such as the Balearic Islands, Canary Islands and Sardinia (which are all very popular holiday destinations with German travellers).

Part of the Series D funding will go on opening more Bookiply offices across Europe so it can grow its service offering for regional vacation rental owners.

The division aims to reach property owners whose properties are not yet online, as well as optimizing digital listings that aren’t doing as well as they might, so having physical service locations is a strategy to help with onboarding owners who may be newbies to digital listing.

Commenting on the funding in a statement, Laurel Bowden, partner at 83North said: “Vacation rentals are a very competitive market and Holidu’s growth throughout the pandemic has been highly impressive. We are attracted by their strong operating efficiency and proven ability to grow market by market.”

Last year Holidu was among scores of startups in the travel, accommodation and jobs sectors that signed a letter to the European Commission urging antitrust action against Google.

The coalition accused the tech giant of unfairly leveraging its dominant position in search in order to elbow into other markets via tactics like self-preferencing, warning EU lawmakers that homegrown businesses were at risk without swift enforcement to rein in abusive behaviors.

Although in Holidu’s case it’s managed to grow despite the pandemic — and despite Google.

Asked how much of an ongoing concern Google’s behavior is for the growth of its business, Siebers told TechCrunch: “Given its size and market position, we believe Google carries a special responsibility in the search market. Furthermore, we believe in merit based competition to drive innovation and provide users with the best products. We have joined the letter to the EC as in our view, Google does not fully live up to its responsibilities in all areas of its product.

“The way Google displays specialized search products in many travel verticals does, in our view, not comply with the principle of fair, merit based competition. It gives Google’s own product eyeballs which no other player could attract in the same way.”

“We have not yet seen noticeable changes in Google’s search box integration but we are confident that Google will eventually provide a level playing field. Even if this would take some time and is important, we are not overly worried as we have a very diversified business. Among others, with Bookiply we have a strongly growing offering towards homeowners which is independent of Google’s activities in the market,” he added.

Since the coalition wrote the letter the Commission has unveiled a legislative proposal to apply ex ante regulations to so called ‘gatekeeper’ platforms — a designation that looks highly likely to apply to Google, although the Digital Markets Act (DMA) is still a long way off becoming pan-EU law.

Siebers said Holidu supports this plan for a set of ‘dos and don’ts’ that the most powerful platforms must abide by.

“We are supportive of the commission’s proposal and believe not only the act itself but also enforcement will drive innovation and better products for customers,” he added. “Enabling free and fair competition is a core deliverable for a regulator in a market place and we have high expectations towards the EU in this regard. If we achieve this, I am certain we will  see an  increase in innovation, investments and activities in areas which are currently impacted by gatekeeper’s activities.”

#83north, #airbnb, #booking-holdings, #booking-com, #covid-19, #europe, #european-commission, #european-union, #fundings-exits, #holidu, #homeaway, #kees-koolen, #laurel-bowden, #munich, #payment-solutions, #prime-ventures, #search, #search-engine, #sharing-economy, #tc, #tourism, #travel, #travel-industry, #travel-sites, #vacation-rental, #vrbo

Persona lands $50M for identity verification after seeing 10x YoY revenue growth

The identity verification space has been heating up for a while and the COVID-19 pandemic has only accelerated demand with more people transacting online.

Persona, a startup focused on creating a personalized identity verification experience “for any use case,” aims to differentiate itself in an increasingly crowded space. And investors are banking on the San Francisco-based company’s ability to help businesses customize the identity verification process — and beyond — via its no-code platform in the form of a $50 million Series B funding round. 

Index Ventures led the financing, which also included participation from existing backer Coatue Management. In late January 2020, Persona raised $17.5 million in a Series A round. The company declined to reveal at which valuation this latest round was raised.

Businesses and organizations can access Persona’s platform by way of an API, which lets them use a variety of documents, from government-issued IDs through to biometrics, to verify that customers are who they say they are. The company wants to make it easier for organizations to implement more watertight methods based on third-party documentation, real-time evaluation such as live selfie checks and AI to verify users.

Persona’s platform also collects passive signals such as a user’s device, location, and behavioral signals to provide a more holistic view of a user’s risk profile. It offers a low code and no code option depending on the needs of the customer.

The company’s momentum is reflected in its growth numbers. The startup’s revenue has surged by “more than 10 times” while its customer base has climbed by five times over the past year, according to co-founder and CEO Rick Song. Meanwhile, its headcount has more than tripled to just over 50 people.

When we look back at the space five to 10 years ago, AI was the next differentiation and every identity verification company is doing AI and machine learning,” Song told TechCrunch. “We believe the next big differentiator is more about tailoring and personalizing the experience for individuals.”

As such, Song believes that growth can be directly tied to Persona’s ability to help companies with “unique” use cases with a SaaS platform that requires little to no code and not as much heavy lifting from their engineering teams. Its end goal, ultimately, is to help businesses deter fraud, stay compliant and build trust and safety while making it easier for them to customize the verification process to their needs. Customers span a variety of industries, and include Square, Robinhood, Sonder, Brex, Udemy, Gusto, BlockFi and AngelList, among others.

“The strategy your business needs for identity verification and management is going to be completely different if you’re a travel company verifying guests versus a delivery service onboarding new couriers versus a crypto company granting access to user funds,” Song added. “Even businesses within the same industry should tailor the identity verification experience to each customer if they want to stand out.”

Image Credits: Persona

For Song, another thing that helps Persona stand out is its ability to help customers beyond the sign-on and verification process. 

“We’ve built an identity infrastructure because we don’t just help businesses at a single point in time, but rather throughout the entire lifecycle of a relationship,” he told TechCrunch.

In fact, much of the company’s growth last year came in the form of existing customers finding new use cases within the platform in addition to new customers signing on, Song said.

“We’ve been watching existing customers discover more ways to use Persona. For example, we were working with some of our customer base on a single use case and now we might be working with them on 10 different problems — anywhere from account opening to a bad actor investigation to account recovery and anything in between,” he added. “So that has probably been the biggest driver of our growth.”

Index Ventures Partner Mark Goldberg, who is taking a seat on Persona’s board as part of the financing, said he was impressed by the number of companies in Index’s own portfolio that raved about Persona.

“We’ve had our antennas up for a long time in this space,” he told TechCrunch. “We started to see really rapid adoption of Persona within the Index portfolio and there was the sense of a very powerful and very user friendly tool, which hadn’t really existed in the category before.”

Its personalization capabilities and building block-based approach too, Goldberg said, makes it appealing to a broader pool of users.

“The reality is there’s so many ways to verify a user is who they say they are or not on the internet, and if you give people the flexibility to design the right path to get to a yes or no, you can just get to a much better outcome,” he said. “That was one of the things we heard — that the use cases were not like off the rack, and I think that has really resonated in a time where people want and expect the ability to customize.”

Persona plans to use its new capital to grow its team another twofold by year’s end to support its growth and continue scaling the business.

In recent months, other companies in the space that have raised big rounds include Socure and Sift.

#angellist, #artificial-intelligence, #coatue, #driver, #funding, #fundings-exits, #identity-verification, #index-ventures, #machine-learning, #mark-goldberg, #persona, #recent-funding, #saas, #san-francisco, #startup, #startups, #tc, #travel, #venture-capital, #verification

Tourlane-Verlust liegt im Vor-Corona-Jahr bei über 20 Millionen


Das Berliner Travel-Startup Tourlane legt neue Unternehmenszahlen vor – und zwar den Jahresabschluss für das Geschäftsjahr 2019. Tourlane, 2016 von Julian Stiefel und Julian Weselek gegründet wurde, vermittelt “maßgeschneiderte Traumreisen” im höheren Preissegment. Insgesamt flossen in den vergangenen Jahren schon mehr als 100 Millionen US-Dollar in Tourlane.  Sogar mitten im Corona-Jahr 2020 investierten HV Capital, Sequoia Capital, Spark Capital und DN Capital noch einmal 20 Millionen Dollar in Tourlane.

Der rasante Aufstieg von Tourlane, der 2020 von der weltweiten Corona-Pandemie unterbrochen wurde, begann Ende 2018. Damals investierten Sequoia und Co. 24 Millionen in das junge Unternehmen. Schon im Mai 2019 folgten dann weitere 47 Millionen. Mit dem vielen Geld baute das Unternehmen vor allem sein Team massiv auf. 2017 wirkten gerade einmal 20 Mitarbeiter:innen für Tourlane. 2018 waren es schon 68 und 2019 bereits 162 Arbeitnehmer:innen.

Der Jahresfehlbetrag von Tourlane stieg gleichzeitig von 1,1 Millionen Euro im Jahre 2017 auf zuletzt 20,9 Millionen. Insgesamt kostete der Aufbau von Tourlane bis Ende 2019 bereits knapp 30 Millionen. Bis zu diesem Zeitpunkt hatte das Unternehmen aber auch schon mehr als 65,5 Millionen eingesammelt. Das Corona-Jahr 2020 dürfte für Tourlane auf jeden Fall nicht gut gelaufen sein. Wobei das Tourlane-Team ohnehin sicherlich weiter mit hohen Verlusten gerechnet hatte. Dazu war Tourlane vor der Pandemie einfach viel zu sehr auf Wachstum und vor allem Investitionen in Technologie ausgerichtet.

Fakten aus dem Jahresabschluss 2019

* Der vorliegende Jahresabschluss wurde nach den einschlägigen Vorschriften des HGB und GmbHG aufgestellt. Ergänzende Bestimmungen des Gesellschaftsvertrags waren nicht zu beachten. Es gelten die Vorschriften für kleine Kapitalgesellschaften.

  • Die durchschnittliche Zahl der während des Geschäftsjahres beschäftigten Arbeitnehmer betrug 162.

Tourlane im Zahlencheck

2019: 20,9 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)
2018: 7,2 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)
2017: 1,1 Millionen Euro  (Jahresfehlbetrag)
2016: 108.373 Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Tourlane

#aktuell, #reloaded, #tourlane, #travel, #zahlencheck

Bandwango raises $3.1M to power tourism- and experience-focused deals

You might think that a startup whose primary customers are tourism bureaus would have had a pretty rough 2020, but CEO Monir Parikh said Bandwango‘s customer base more than doubled in the past year,  growing from 75 to 200.

In Parikh’s words, the Murray, Utah-based startup has built a platform called the Destination Experience Engine and designed for “connecting businesses with communities.” That means bringing together offers from local restaurants, retailers, wineries, breweries, state parks and more into package deals — such as the Newport Beach Dine Pass and the Travel Iowa State Passport — which are then sold by tourism bureaus.

Obviously, the pandemic dealt a big blow to tourism, but in response, many of these organizations shifted focus to deals that could entice locals to support nearby businesses and attractions. Parikh predicted that even after the pandemic, tourism bureaus will continue to understand that “local-focused tourism is going to be part of the mix of what we do — locals are your ambassadors, they are the best organic marketing channel.”

Plus, Parikh said that as new privacy regulations make it harder to collect data about online visitors, it’s becoming more challenging for tourism bureaus to “to prove to their funders that they’re having an economic impact.” So where bureaus were content in the past to advertise deals and then link out to other sites where customers could make the actual purchases, selling the deals themselves has become a new way to prove their worth.

Bandwango founder and CEO Monir Parikh

Bandwango founder and CEO Monir Parikh

With last year’s growth, Bandwango has raised $3.1 million in seed funding led by Next Frontier Capital, with participation from Kickstart, Signal Peak Ventures, SaaS Ventures, and Ocean Azul Partners. (The startup had previously raised only $700,000 in funding.)

Parikh said that until now, Bandwango has been a largely full service option. The selling point, after all, is that the tourism bureaus already “have great relationships with these local businesses,” but the startup can handle the hard work of “trying to wrangle 200 of their local businesses” to offer deals and accept those deals in-store.

“Our mantra is: We become your back office,” he added. But with the new funding, he wants the startup to build a self-serve product as well. “What I say to my team is that a 90-year-old grandmother, as well as 12-year-old teenager, should be able to come into our platform and say, ‘I want to create a local savings program or an ale trail’ and do it end-to-end, without our assistance.”

And while Bandwango is currently focused on providing a white-label solution to its customers (rather than building a consumer deal destination of its own), Parikh said it eventually distribute these deals more broadly by creating its own “private label brands.”

#bandwango, #funding, #fundings-exits, #next-frontier-capital, #startups, #tc, #travel

#Brandneu – 9 richtig spannende neue Startups aus München


deutsche-startups.de präsentiert heute wieder einmal einige junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind, sowie Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind. Übrigens: Noch mehr neue Startups gibt es jede Woche in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter Startup-Radar.

hydesk
hydesk aus München entwickelt “nachhaltiges Möbeldesign für mobil und flexible arbeitende Kunden”. Das erste Produkt der Jungfirma, die von Finian Carey und Daniel Brunsteiner gegründet wurde, ist ein faltbarer, tragbarer und recycelbarer Stehtisch und passt somit gut in die derzeitigen HomeOffice-Zeiten.

Pina
Das Münchner Startup Pina setzt mit Hilfe künstlicher Intelligenz auf die Digitalisierung des Zertifizierungsprozesses. So sollen Waldbesitzern die Möglichkeit haben, am freiwilligen Emissionsmarkt teilzunehmen. ”So wird lokaler Klimaschutz im Wald Realität: digital, messbar, und transparent”, schreibt das Team.

exfinity
exfinity positioniert sich als B2B2C-Plattform für Aktivitäten. “We offer the world’s biggest diversified portfolio of attractions and experiences”, teilt das junge Münchner Startup mit. Das Startup wurde unter anderem von Christina Borensky und Georg Schiffmann gegründet, die vorher mit hip trips unterwegs waren.

Optiwiser
Das Münchner Startup Optiwiser kümmert sich um Operations- und Supply Chain-Management. Die Bajuwaren schreiben zu ihrem Konzept: “We help our clients to boost their supply chain performance through the power of Artificial Intelligence – optimize your data wiser”.

PetLeo
PetLeo aus München bringt sich als “digitale Plattform für moderne Tierbesitzer, innovative Tierärzte und glückliche Haustiere” in Stellung. Die App des Startups bietet Tierbesitzern Gassirouten und Giftköder-Alerts vor allem aber eine digitale Gesundheitsakte und Videosprechstunden mit Tierärzten.

Zenmieter
Das Team von Zenmieter möchte sich als die “Zukunft des Vermietens” einen Namen machen. Vermieter können ihre Wohnungen direkt an Zenmieter vermieten. Das Startup des Venture Builders Stryber übernimmt dann alle Aufgaben des Vermieters. Zum Team gehört unter anderem Maximilian Möhring (Keyp).

Melon
Mit Melon hievte Gründerin Cornelia Weinzierl einen Marktplatz für veganes Essen ins Netz. Die Münchnerin nennt es “das eBay und AirBnB für veganes Essen”. Über Melon kann jeder selbst gekochtes, veganes Essen mit Menschen aus der Umgebung teilen bzw. kaufen.

Organic Labs
Bei Organic Labs können Onliner Super Hafer, einen Haferdrink in Pulverform zum Selbermachen, bestellen. “Die Vorteile: Wir vermeiden CO2-Emissionen durch den überflüssig gewordenen Transport von Wasser und können auch noch Verpackungsmüll einsparen”, schreibt das Startup. 

Audicle
Das Münchner Unternehmen Audicle setzt auf das erfolgreiche Curio-Konzept. Das Startup, das von Wolf Weimer vorangetrieben wird, bietet somit quasi die Zeitung zum Hören. Alles gebündelt in einer kostenpflichtigen App. Im Angebot sind derzeit “hunderte Audio-Artikel deutscher Zeitungen und Magazine”.

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über neue Startups. Alle Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der Startup-Szene. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #audicle, #audio, #b2b, #brandneu, #climatetech, #d2c, #e-health, #exfinity, #food, #hydesk, #medien, #melon, #munchen, #optiwiser, #organic-labs, #petleo, #pina, #proptech, #startup-radar, #stryber, #telemedizin, #travel, #zenmieter

Collaborative iOS app Craft Docs secures $8M, led by Creandum and a ‘Skyscanner Mafia’

Launched in only November last year, the Craft Docs app — which was built from the ground up as an iOS app for collaborative documents — has secured an $8 million Series A round led by Creandum. Also participating was InReach Ventures, Gareth Williams, former CEO and co-founder of Skyscanner, and a number of other tech entrepreneurs, many of whom are ex-Skyscanner.

Currently available on iOS, iPadOS and MacOS, Craft now plans to launch APIs, extended integrations, and a browser-based editor in 2021. It has aspirations to become a similar product to Notion, and the founder and CEO Balint Grosz told me over a Zoom call that “Notion is very much focused around writing and wikis and all that sort of stuff. We have a lot of users coming from Notion, but we believe we have a better solution for people, mainly for written content. Notion is very strong with its databases and structural content. People just happen to use it for other stuff. So we are viewed as a very strong competitor by our users, because of the similarities in the product. I don’t believe our markets overlap much, but right now from the outside people do switch from Notion to us, and they do perceive us as being competitors.”

He told me this was less down to the app experience than “the hierarchical content. We have this structure where you can create notes within notes, so with every chunk of text you add content and navigate style, and add inside of that – and notion has that as well. And that is a feature which not many products have, so that is the primary reason why people tend to compare us.”

Craft says it’s main advantages over Notion are UX; Data storage and privacy (Craft is offline first, with real-time sync and collaboration; you can use 3rd party cloud services (i.e. iCloud); and integrations with other tools.

Orosz was previously responsible for Skyscanner’s mobile strategy after the company acquired his previous company, Distinction.

Fredrik Cassel, General Partner at Creandum, said in a statement: “Since our first discussions we’ve been impressed by both the amount of love users have for Craft, as well as the team’s unique ability to create a product that is beautiful and powerful at the same time. The upcoming features around connectivity and data accessibility truly set Craft apart from the competition.”

Craft ipad app

Craft ipad app

Roberto Bonazinga, Co-founder at InReach Ventures, added: “We invested in Craft on day zero because we were fascinated by the clarity and the boldness of Balint’s vision – to reinvent how millions of people can structure their thoughts and write them down in the most effective and beautiful way.”

The launch and funding of the Craft startup suggests there is something of a “Skyscanner Mafia” emerging, after its acquisition by Trip.com Group (formerly Ctrip), the largest travel firm in China, $1.75 billion in 2016.

Other backers of the company include Carlos Gonzalez (former CPO at Skyscanner, CTPO at GoCardless), Filip Filipov (former VP Strategy at Skyscanner), Ross McNairn (former CEO at Dorsai, CPO at TravelPerk), Stefan Lesser (former Technology and Partnership Manager at Apple) and Akos Kapui (Former Head of Technology at Skyscanner, VP of Engineering at Shapr3D).

#app-store, #apple, #ceo, #china, #co-founder, #creandum, #distinction, #europe, #general-partner, #inreach-ventures, #macos, #notion, #operating-systems, #skyscanner, #software, #tc, #travel, #trip-com, #yo

After similar moves for Shopping and Flights, Google makes hotel listings free

Last year, Google made a significant change to its Google Shopping destination by making it free for e-commerce retailers to sell on Google, when before the Shopping tab had been dominated by paid product listings. It also made it free for partners to participate in Google Flights. Today, the company announced it’s now doing the same thing for hotel booking links on the Google.com/travel vertical.

Beginning this week, Google will make it free for hotels and travel companies around the world to appear in hotel booking links on Google.com/travel — a change that will give users a more comprehensive look into hotel room availability as they research and plan their trips.

The company is positioning this change as a way it can better help meet consumers’ needs, ahead of the expected return of travel as the pandemic comes to an end.

“When travel does resume in earnest, it’s crucial that people can find the information they’re looking for and easily connect with travel companies online,” writes Richard Holden, VP of Product Management for Google’s Travel efforts, in today’s announcement.

In reality, the adoption of free listings is part of a larger effort underway at Google to shift many of its destinations that were previously powered by paid ads to become free listings. On the e-commerce front, this shift was meant to strategically counteract the growing threat from Amazon in e-commerce, which has steadily grown its ad business over the years. Amazon is also now often the first place users go to search for products, bypassing Google entirely — a worrying threat to Google’s core ad business.

Image Credits: Google

Shortly after the launch of free e-commerce listings, Google said it saw increases in clicks to its Shopping tab (70% lift as of last June) and an increase of impressions on the Shopping tab (130% lift). The idea is that, over time, Google will be able to pull in more brands to its e-commerce platform, increasing competition. As the market becomes more crowded, some brands that were previously benefitting from the free listings will turn to ads in order to increase their visibility.

Travel, including flights and hotels, are other areas where Google is positioned to grow in terms of post-COVID web traffic. For the past several years, however, hotel booking links were offered on Google through paid Hotel Ads, which would display the real-time pricing and availability for specific travel dates.

With these listings now becoming free, consumers will have an expanded set of options. And that will make Google a more reliable place to search for bookings. It could help Google compete with an array of travel booking apps and services, which are also expected to boom in the post-COVID months to come. And though the pandemic is not over yet, there are already signals that some are treating it as such in the U.S., with states lifting mask mandates and Spring Breakers planning their annual trips to Florida beaches, for example. The full effect of the pandemic’s end hasn’t yet to be seen in travel, but consumer appetite is surely there after a year of locking down and staying at home.

Google today argues that the addition of the free listings will generate increased booking traffic and user engagement on its platform. And this will, in turn, expand the reach of advertisers’ Hotel Ads campaigns.

Meanwhile, the shift to free listing will help bring potential new advertisers into the pipeline, too, as hotel and travel companies will be able to list for free by establishing a Hotel Center account. Over time, Google says the onboarding process will be made even easier and it will reduce the complexity of its tools to provide the hotel listings. It notes that its existing hotel partners who already participate in the Hotel Prices API and Hotel Ads don’t have to take any action to appear in free booking links.

 

#ad-tech, #advertising, #advertising-tech, #google, #hotels, #search, #travel

Luxury air travel startup Aero raises $20M

Aero, a startup backed by Garrett Camp’s startup studio Expa, has raised $20 million in Series A funding — right as CEO Uma Subramanian said demand for air travel is returning “with a vengeance.”

I last wrote about Aero in 2019, when it announced Subramanian’s appointment as CEO, along with the fact that it had raised a total of $16 million in funding. Subramanian told me that after the announcement, the startup (which had already run test flights between Mykonos and Ibiza) spent the next few months buying and retrofitting planes, with plans for a summer 2020 launch.

Obviously, the pandemic threw a wrench into those plans, but a smaller wrench than you might think. Subramanian said that as borders re-opened and travel resumed in a limited capacity, Aero began to offer flights.

“We had a great summer,” she said. “We sold a lot of seats, and we were gross margin positive in July and August.”

The startup describes its offering as “semi-private” air travel — you fly out of private terminals, on small and spacious planes (Subramanian said the company has taken vehicles with 37 seats and retrofitted them to hold only 16), with a personalized, first-class experience delivered by its concierge team. Aero currently offers a single route between Los Angeles and Aspen, with one-way tickets costing $1,250.

Subramanian was previously CEO of Airbus’ helicopter service Voom, and she said she approached the company “very skeptically,” since the conventional wisdom in the aviation industry is that the business is all about “putting as many people into a finite amount of square footage” as possible. But she claimed that early demand showed her that “the thesis is real.”

“There is a set of people who want this,” she said. “Air travel used to be aspirational, something people got dressed up for. We want to bring back the magical part of the travel experience.”

After all, if you’re the kind of “premium traveler” who might already spend “thousands of dollars a night” on a vacation in Amangiri, Utah, it seems a little silly to be “spending hours trying to find the a low-cost flight out of Salt Lake City.”

Aero interior

Image Credits: Aero

Subramanian suggested that while demand for business travel may be slow to return (it sounds like she enjoyed the ability to fundraise without getting on a plane), the demand for leisure travel is already back, and will only grow as the pandemic ends. Plus, the steps that Aero took to create a luxury experience also meant that it’s well-suited for social distancing.

Speaking of fundraising, the Series A was led by Keyframe Capital, with Keyframe’s chief investment officer John Rapaport joining the Aero board. Cyrus Capital Partners and Expa also participated.

The new funding will allow Aero to grow its team and to add more flights, Subramanian said. Next up is a route between Los Angeles and Cabo San Lucas scheduled to launch in April, and she added that the company will be returning to Europe this year.

“It’s a horrendous time to be Lufthansa, but counterintuitively, it’s best time to start something from scratch,” she said — in large part because it’s been incredibly affordable to buy planes and other assets.


Early Stage is the premier ‘how-to’ event for startup entrepreneurs and investors. You’ll hear first-hand how some of the most successful founders and VCs build their businesses, raise money and manage their portfolios. We’ll cover every aspect of company-building: Fundraising, recruiting, sales, product market fit, PR, marketing and brand building. Each session also has audience participation built-in – there’s ample time included for audience questions and discussion.

#aero, #air-travel, #funding, #fundings-exits, #startups, #tc, #travel

Travel startup GetYourGuide secures $97M revolving credit facility

Many countries hit hard by Covid-19 are beginning to see a glimmer of optimism from the arrival of vaccinations. Now, a promising travel startup that saw its growth arrested by the arrival and persistence of the pandemic is announcing a $97 million financing facility to help it stay the course until it can finally resume normal business.

GetYourGuide, the Berlin startup that curates, organizes and lets travelers and others book tours and other experiences, has secured a revolving credit facility of €80 million ($97 million at current rates). The financing is being led by UniCredit, with CitiGroup, Silicon Valley Bank, Deutsche Bank and KfW also participating.

CFO Nils Chrestin said in an interview that the funding will let GetYourGuide come “sprinting out of the gates” when consumers are in a better position to enjoy travel experiences again.

The capital could be used potentially for normal business expenses, for acquisitions or investments, or other strategic initiatives, such as more investment into the company’s in-house Originals tour operations or new services to book last-minute experiences, he added.

And even if a lot of tourism has really slowed down, there are still people taking short-distance trips or buying activities in the cities where they live (and are not leaving). While some metro areas like London are essentially only open for booking well in advance (when the hope is lockdown restrictions might be eased), other cities like Rome or Amsterdam have activities available for booking today.

GetYourGuide’s latest financing news underscores how some startups — specifically those whose business models have not lended themselves well to pandemic living — are getting more creative with their approaches to staying afloat.

GetYourGuide has raised more than $600 million in equity capital since 2009, with its Series E of $484 million in 2019 (before the pandemic) valuing it at well over $1 billion.

But more recently, the startup backed by the likes of SoftBank, Temasek, Lakestar, and others has been shoring up its position with alternative forms of finance.

In October, GetYourGuide closed a convertible note of $133 million. While it has yet to raise the equity round that would covert that note — it could be up to 18 months before another equity round is closed, CEO and co-founder Johannes Reck told me at the time — this latest revolving debt facility is giving the startup another efficient route to accessing money.

Unlike equity rounds (or notes that can convert into equity), revolving debt facilities are non-dilutive, flexible lines of credit, where companies can quickly draw down funds as needed up to the full value of the facility. After repaying with interest, they can re-draw up to the same limit again.

In that regard, revolving debt facilities are not unlike credit cards for consumers, and similarly, they are a sign of how banks rate GetYourGuide, and perhaps the travel industry more generally, as strong candidates for paying back, and eventually bouncing back.

“We are very happy to help GetYourGuide continue its growth trajectory during this extraordinary situation that we find ourselves in”, says Jan Kupfer, head of corporate and investment banking, Germany, at UniCredit, in a statement. “The successful financing also shows once again our unique tech advisory approach, where we combine our deep tech expertise with the broad product range of a pan-European commercial bank.”

“Extraordinary situation” is perhaps an understatement for the rough year that travel businesses have had.

There do remain parts of the industry that have yet to make the leap to digital platforms — experiences, the focus of GetYourGuide, is very much one of them — and that makes for very interesting and potentially big businesses.

But between government-imposed travel restrictions, and people reluctant to venture far, or mix and mingle with others, startups like GetYourGuide have essentially found themselves treading water until things get moving again.

Last October, GetYourGuide said it had passed 45 million ticket sales in aggregate on its platform, but that figure was only up by 5 million in 10 months. As we pointed out at the time, that speaks both to a major slowdown in growth and to the struggles that companies like it are facing, and it is very likely far from the projections the startup had originally made for its expansion before the pandemic hit.

It’s not the only one: air travel, hotels, and other sectors that fall into the travel and tourism industries have largely been stagnating or in freefall or decline this year. Many believe that those who will be left standing after all of this will have to collectively brace themselves for potentially years of financial turmoil to come back from it.

Interestingly, Airbnb presents an alternative reality, at least for the moment. It appears to have captured investors’ attention and since going public in December has been on a steady upswing.

Analysts may say that there hasn’t been a lot of news coming out about the company to merit that rise, but one explanation has been that the optimism has more to do with its longer-term potential and for how tech-savvy routes to filling travel needs will indeed be the services that people will use before the rest.

That could be part of the pitch for GetYouGuide, too. Chrestin said that the company believes that travel in the U.S. market, a key region for the startup, is looking like it might rebound in Q2 or Q3. Yet even if it doesn’t, the company has the runway to wait longer.

Chrestin noted that GetYourGuide has “reinvented internal processes” and is operating much more efficiently now. “If it weren’t for the global hardship this crisis is causing, we would look back and say it was quite transformational,” he said.

“The company is very well capitalized and fully funded to profitability. Even if the current travel volume stayed like this for three years, we would not run out of capital,” he continued. “We have sufficient capital even for that scenario, but we don’t think that will happen.”

#entertainment, #europe, #experiences, #finance, #getyourguide, #tc, #tourism, #travel

#Brandneu – 6 neue Startups, die ihr euch einmal ansehen solltet


deutsche-startups.de präsentiert heute wieder einmal einige junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind, sowie Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind. Übrigens: Noch mehr neue Startups gibt es in unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar.

Kausa
Kausa kümmert sich um Business Intelligence. Das Startup aus dem Hause Merantix teilt dazu mit: “Our mission is to empower businesses to make data-driven decisions faster and more effortlessly. Therefore, we are building an analytics platform using machine learning to reason why KPIs change”.

A+energy
Das Berliner Startup A+energy tritt an, um den “Strommarkt zu revolutionieren: Weg von Ineffizienz, Intransparenz, und teuren und unübersichtlichen Tarifen zu dem fairsten Stromanbieter auf dem Markt”. Das Strom-Startup wird von Matthias Martensen vorangetrieben.

mercanis
Mit mercanis möchten scoutbee-Gründer Fabian Heinrich und Moritz Weiermann (zuletzt Director Of Operations, scoutbee) eine “neue Art Dienstleistungen zu kaufen” zu etablieren. Our cutting-edge tool enables customers to source services in a smart, efficient, and compliant manner”, teilt das Berliner Startup mit.

Ride
Das Berliner FinTech Ride wurde von Christine Kiefer (BillPay, Pair Finance) und Felix Schulte gegründet. Das Gründerteam möchte “Finanzprodukte und die Vermögensstrukturierung demokratisieren”. Rise sieht sich dabei das “das erste Fintech, das sich auf die echte Rendite, nach Steuern und Kosten, konzentriert”.

The Staycation Collection
Hinter dem Berliner Travel-Startup The Staycation Collection, das von Emily McDonnell gegründet wurde, verbirgt sich eine “Travel Agency for the Digital Age”. Die Jungfirma möchte vor allem mit einer Auswahl an Hotels und Ferienwohnungen punkten.

mypandoo.de
Hinter mypandoo.de verbirgt sich ein Online-Shop für nachhaltige Naturkosmetik. Wichtig ist den Berlinern dabei, dass alles “ganz ohne Plastik und Zusatzstoffe” auskommt. Zudem plant mypandoo-Team “eigene Kosmetik wie Deocreme und Seifen herzustellen”.

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über neue Startups. Alle Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der Startup-Szene. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer