Merging Airbnb and the traditional hotel model, Mexico City’s Casai raises $23 million to grow in Latin America

With travel and tourism rising across Latin America, Casai, a startup combining Airbnb single unit rentals with hotel room amenities, has raised $23 million to expand its business across Latin America.

The company, which initially was as hit hard by regional responses to the COVID-19 pandemic as other businesses in the hospitality industry has recovered to reach nearly 90 percent of total capacity on the 200 units it manages around Mexico City.

The company was co-founded by chief executive Nico Barawid, a former head of international expansion at Nova Credit and consultant with BCG, and chief operating officer María del Carmen Herrerías Salazar, who previously worked at one of Mexico’s largest hotel operators, Grupo Presidente.

The two met two years ago at a barbecue in Mexico City and began speaking about ways to update the hospitality industry taking the best of Airbnb’s short term rental model of individual units and pairing it with the quality control and standards that guests expect from a hotel chain.

“I wanted to define a product from a consumer angle,” said Barawid. “I wanted this to exist.”

Before the SARS-Cov-2 outbreak Casai’s units were primarily booked through travel partners like HotelTonight or Expedia. Now the company has a direct brisk direct booking business thanks to the work of its chief technology officer, a former engineer at Google named Andres Martinez.

The company’s new financing was led by Andreessen Horowitz and included additional commitments from the firm’s Cultural Leadership Fund, Kaszek Ventures, Monashees Capital, Global Founders Capital, Liquid 2 Ventures, and individual investors including the founders of Nova Credit, Loft, Kavak and Runa.

Casai also managed to nab a debt facility of up to $25 million from TriplePoint Capital, bringing its total cash haul to $48 million in equity and debt.

Image Credit: Casai

The big round is in part thanks to the company’s compelling value proposition, which offers guest not only places to stay equipped with a proprietary smart hardware hub and the Casai app, but also a Google Home, smart lights, and Chromecast-kitted televisions, but also a lounge where guests can stay ahead of their check-in or after check-out.

And while the company’s vision is focused on Latin America now, its management team definitely sees the opportunity to create a global brand and business.

The founding team also includes a chief revenue officer, Alberto Ramos, who worked at McKinsey and a chief growth officer, Daniel Hermann, who previously worked at the travel and lifestyle company, Selina. The head of design, Alexa Backal, used to work at GAIA Design, and its vice president of experience, Cristina Crespo, formerly ran WeWork’s international design studio.

“To successfully execute on this opportunity, a team needs to bring together expertise from consumer technology, design, hospitality, real estate and financial services to develop world-class operations needed to deliver on a first-class experience,” said Angela Strange, a general partner at Andreessen Horowitz, who’s taking a seat on the Casai board. “It was obvious when I met Nico and Maricarmen that they are operationally laser-focused and have uniquely blended expertise across verticals, with unique views on the consumer experience.”

#airbnb, #andreessen, #andreessen-horowitz, #angela-strange, #chief-operating-officer, #chief-technology-officer, #engineer, #financial-services, #general-partner, #global-founders-capital, #hoteltonight, #kaszek-ventures, #laser, #latin-america, #liquid-2-ventures, #mckinsey, #mexico, #mexico-city, #monashees-capital, #nova-credit, #real-estate, #runa, #selina, #sharing-economy, #tc, #tourism, #travel, #triplepoint-capital, #vacation-rental, #wework

0

Understanding Airbnb’s summer recovery

New numbers concerning Airbnb’s summer performance were reported this week, with The Information adding to the performance figures that Bloomberg previously detailed earlier this year.

Airbnb announced that it filed privately to pursue a debut this August. We have yet to see its public IPO filing, but, all the same, the flotation is coming.


The Exchange explores startups, markets and money. Read it every morning on Extra Crunch, or get The Exchange newsletter every Saturday.


If you’re like me, this year’s chaotic news cycles have made it hard to track any single story well. So this morning I want to put together a financially-focused chronology of Airbnb’s year, including the new data. Enough has happened over the past few months that any prior work we’ve done is too dated to use.

So, let’s rewind the clock and dig into the biggest financial moment from Airbnb’s 2020, capping off with the latest reporting, including details from the company itself on booking volume recovery as we go.

This should be easy, fun and useful. Let’s go!

Airbnb’s 2020

Heading into 2020, Airbnb promised to go public in 2020. Given that there’s technical pressure from holders of Airbnb stock options for the company go public inside the year, the vow made sense. Airbnb was founded around 12 years ago, meaning that the company was already a bit aged for a private firm on an IPO path. Toss in the options issue, and if Airbnb wanted to hold onto its workforce, this was the year to go.

And Airbnb was well-capitalized heading into this year, so a direct listing was in the cards.

Enter 2020 and a few unexpected events. When COVID-19 hit Airbnb’s key markets it took the travel market with it, leading to this column asking on March 18th whether the company could go public this year given the state of its industry. At that point we knew that Airbnb’s cash balance was about $2 billion heading into the start of the year, and that the company had reported Q4 2019 revenue of around $1.1 billion (+32% YoY, per Bloomberg) and negative earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization of $276.4 million (+92.4% YoY, per Bloomberg).

The company’s persistent lack of profits heading into 2020 was the subject of our curiosity at the start of the year.

In late March, Airbnb announced that it would pay out $250 million to hosts to soften the blow of the pandemic’s travel declines. That was not a cheap move, and when the company expanded the policy this column wrote that it was “an intelligent if expensive way to help preserve user trust.”

#airbnb, #covid-19, #fundings-exits, #proptech, #startups, #tc, #the-exchange, #travel

0

Travel activities platform KKDay raises $75 million Series C as it focuses on “staycations”

With lockdowns around the world, the COVID-19 pandemic has hit the travel industry especially hard. In Asia, however, several startups are adapting by focusing on domestic activities (or “staycations”) instead of international travel. They include Taipei-based KKday, which announced today that it has closed a $75 million Series C led by Cool Japan Fund and the National Development Fund of Taiwan. Existing investors Monk’s Hill Ventures and MindWorks Capital also returned for the round.

Founded in 2014, KKDay will use its new funding on Rezio, a booking management platform it began piloting in March, starting with Japan and Taiwan.

Created for tour operators and activity providers, especially those who previously operated mostly offline, Rezio can help reduce operational costs by allowing its users to set up a booking website that works with different payment gateways and manage availability by tracking bookings from different channels. The latter is especially important during the pandemic because many venues have set up capacity limits.

The company says that Rezio has served over 150,000 customers so far, and will be launched in more Asian markets with its Series C funding. KKDay currently has more than five million users on its platform, and has hosted more than 30,000 tours and other activities so far in 92 countries.

In May 2020, the company began seeing more demand for local travel in Japan, Taiwan and Hong Kong. This parallels Klook, which also saw an increase in demand for “staycations” bookings that helped it recover after its business was hurt during the early stages of the pandemic in Asia.

In a statement, Cool Japan Fund managing director Kazushi Sano said his firm invested in KKDay because “we believe that KKDay’s strong execution and innovative mindset will drive the tourism industry in Japan even under adverse conditions.”

#asia, #bookings, #fundings-exits, #kkday, #startups, #staycations, #taiwan, #tc, #travel

0

#Brandneu – 6 neue Startups, die jeder auf dem Schirm haben sollte


Jeden Tag entstehen überall in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz neue Startups. deutsche-startups.de präsentiert an dieser Stelle wieder einmal einige ganz junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Tagen, Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind sowie einige junge Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind und erstmals für Schlagzeilen gesorgt haben.

Simity
Hinter Simity verbirgt sich eine “CRM-Lösung für lokale Unternehmen, um offline Daten zum Kundenverhalten zu generieren”. Dabei geht es darum, dass Nutzer etwa besser mit ihrem Bestandskunden kommunizieren oder “Gästen vor Ort ein besonderes Angebot” schicken können.

URL: www.simity.de
Hashtags: #Tool #Software #CRM
Ort: Hannover
Gründer: Jan-Niklas Schmitz, Sebastian Böddeker

TripLegend
Das Travel-Startup TripLegend richtet sich an Millennials. Diesen möchte der digitale Reiseveranstalter “einzigartige Kleingruppen-Abenteuerreisen anbieten”. Dazu teilen die Berliner mit: “Wir kombinieren Technologien mit gesundem Menschenverstand, um die besten Lösungen für Mensch und Natur zu entwickeln”.

URL: www.triplegend.com
Hashtags: #Travel
Ort: Berlin
Gründer: Brian Ruhe, Alexander Ditzel, Martin Ditzel

yeew
Das junge Kölner Startup yeew bringt sich als “Partner für lokale Werbung auf Smartphones” in Stellung. Das AdTech aus dem Dunstkreis der Verlagsgruppe Aschendorff wird von den Seriengründern Coskun Tuna, früher Seeding Alliance, und Thorsten Kambach geführt.

URL: www.yeew.de
Hashtags: #AdTech
Ort: Köln
Gründer: Coskun Tuna, Thorsten Kambach

Stargazr
Hinter Stargazr aus Hamburg verbirgt sich ein “webbasierter Softwareanbieter, der Controlling Teams unterstützt, ihr Unternehmensergebnis besser zu verstehen und zu steuern”. Stargazr aus Hamburg liefert somit eine “innovative KI-Software für modernes Controlling”.

URL: www.stargazr.ai
Hashtags: #FinTech #Software
Ort: Hamburg
Gründer: Rafi Wadan, Juan C. Roldan

Philex Protein
Bei Philex Protein dreht sich alles um Proteinsnacks. Das Startup bietet verschiedene Sorten wie Apfel-Banane oder Dattel-Vanille als Backmischungen an. “Wir haben alle Früchte und jede einzelne Nuss gekostet und getestet” – versprechen die Gründer aus Bad Köstritz.

URL: www.philexprotein.com
Hashtags:#Food #eCommerce
Ort: Bad Köstritz
Gründer: Philipp Weiler, Alexander Seliger

JL-Clean
Bei JL-Clean dreht sich alles um Heimtextilreinigungen. Zum Start fokussieren sich die Gründer auf Teppichreinigungen. Polsterreinigung kommen demnächst hinzu. “Wir arbeiten nur mit etablierten mittelständischen Reinigungsunternehmen zusammen”, verspricht das junge Startup.

URL: www.jl-clean.de
Hashtags: #Marktplatz #Dienstleitung
Ort: Frankfurt am Main
Gründer: Janis Curtius, Luca Bös

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über junge, frische und brandneue Startups, die noch nicht jeder kennt. Alle diese Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der bundesweiten Startup-Szene und im besten Fall auf die Agenda von Investoren, Unternehmen und potenziellen Kooperationspartnern. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #brandneu, #jl-clean, #philesimity, #philex-protein, #simity, #stargazr, #startup-radar, #triplegend, #yeew

0

#Brandneu – 6 neue Startups, die Aufmerksamkeit verdient haben


Jeden Tag entstehen überall in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz neue Startups. deutsche-startups.de präsentiert an dieser Stelle wieder einmal einige ganz junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Tagen, Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind sowie einige junge Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind und erstmals für Schlagzeilen gesorgt haben.

Awake Mobility
Das Münchner Startup Awake Mobility möchte den ÖPNV digitalisieren. Konkret geht es unter anderem darum, Bus-Ausfälle zu verhindern und Instandhaltungskosten zu reduzieren. Gelingen soll dies mit Hilfe von Künstlicher Intelligenz und ganz ganz vielen Daten.

URL: www.awakemobility.de
Hashtags: #Mobility
Ort: München
Gründer: Houssem Braham, Daniel Sattel, Daniel Tyoschitz

DocEstate
Bei DocEstate aus Aschaffenburg dreht sich alles um “Immobilienbezogene Behördenauskünfte”. Das Startup tritt an, um diese Dokumente – darunter Grundbuchauszüge – online zu bringen. Das Team verspricht dabei “durchschnittlich zwei Wochen schneller” zu sein, als der klassische Weg.

URL: www.docestate.com
Hashtags: #PropTech
Ort: Aschaffenburg
Gründer: Christoph Schmidt, Jerome Sprinkmeier

Beams
Über das Berliner Startup Beams, bisher als TravelPlaylist bekannt, können Nutzer ihre Lieblingsorte mit Freunden teilen.Gegründet wurde das Travel-Unternehmen von Robert Kilian und Alan Sternberg, früher N26. Auf der Website heißt es: “Helping each other have a good time through step-by-step storytelling”.

URL: www.onbeams.com
Hashtags: #Travel
Ort: Berlin
Gründer: Robert Kilian, Alan Sternberg

AliudQ
Das junge Unternehmen AliudQ kämpft gegen Warteschlangen – etwa als Lösung für den Freizeitsektor. “Von Sensortechnik, Zutrittskontrolle bei Attraktionen oder Events, Ampelsystemen, Drehkreuzsystemen und Scannern bieten wir das passende Equipment”, teilt das Startup mit. 

URL: www.aliudq.de
Hashtags: #Tool #Software
Ort: Hepberg
Gründer: Florian Strecker, Virginia Howington

Tracks
Das junge Berliner Startup Tracks positioniert sich als digitale Emissionsmanagement-Plattform. “Mithilfe künstlicher Intelligenz erstellen wir Handlungsempfehlungen für Logistiker, die dadurch ihre LKW-Flotte besser managen und den Benzinverbrauch reduzieren können”, sagt Gründer Jakob Muus.

URL: www.tracksfortrucks.com
Hashtags: #Logistik #ClimateTech
Ort: Berlin
Gründer: Jakob Muus, Igor Nikolaev 

Yepoda
Bei Yepoda finden schönheitsbewusste Onliner koreanische Hautpflege, also sogenannte K-Beauty-Produkte. “Bei Yepoda glauben wir fest an die koreanische Expertise, die jahrhundertealten Traditionen, sowie die Beauty-Innovationen des Landes”, teilt das Startup mit. 

URL: www.yepoda.de
Hashtags: #eCommerce #Beauty
Ort: Berlin
Gründer: Sander van Bladel, Veronika Strotmann

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über junge, frische und brandneue Startups, die noch nicht jeder kennt. Alle diese Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der bundesweiten Startup-Szene und im besten Fall auf die Agenda von Investoren, Unternehmen und potenziellen Kooperationspartnern. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #aliudq, #awake-mobility, #beams, #brandneu, #docestate, #startup-radar, #tracks, #yepoda

0

#Brandneu – 8 neue Startups, die jeder sich ansehen sollte


Jeden Tag entstehen überall in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz neue Startups. deutsche-startups.de präsentiert an dieser Stelle wieder einmal einige ganz junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Tagen, Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind sowie einige junge Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind und erstmals für Schlagzeilen gesorgt haben.

Plant B
Hinter Plant B steckt ein Trinksnack. “Ganz ohne Zuckerzusatz und Milch, dafür mit hohem Fruchtanteil”, teilt das Unternehmen mit. Das Startup aus Hamburg versucht dabei seinen Drink als “Frühstück, schnelles Mittagessen oder als Stärkung zwischendurch” zu vermarkten.

URL: www.plant-b.com
Hashtags: #Food
Ort: Hamburg
Gründer: Thomas Starz

VinVenture
Das junge Startup VinVenture versucht sich als “Wein-Abenteuer-Mitmach-Club” zu etablieren. Konkret geht es dabei um die “Entdeckung und Förderung von Newcomern der deutschen Weinszene”. Das Startup scoutet dafür Winzertalente und schickt diese durch “ein aufwendiges Casting”.

URL: www.vinventure.de
Hashtags: #eCommerce
Ort:Sankt Johann
Gründer: Natascha Popp, Andreas Schlagkamp

Emmora
Bei Emmora geht es um das Lebensende. Das Startup will Menschen dabei unterstützen, “einen besseren letzten Abschied zu gestalten”. Angehörige können über Emmora etwa “ortsunabhängig und individuell die Bestattung organisieren, wobei mit ausgewählten Dienstleistern vor Ort zusammengearbeitet wird”.

URL: www.emmora.de
Hashtags: #Marktplatz
Ort: Hamburg
Gründer: Victoria Dietrich, Evgeniya Polo

Booksana
Bei Booksana handelt es sich um eine neue Plattform für Kur- und Gesundheitsreisen. Zielgruppe sind Menschen jenseits der 50, die auf der Suche nach dem perfekten Kurort sind. Insbesondere Bilder und Erfahrungsberichte sollen bei der Auswahl helfen.

URL: www.booksana.com
Hashtags: #Travel #eCommerce
Ort: Berlin
Gründer: Alexander Gross

HalbeStundeÜben
Das Team von HalbeStundeÜben will Musiklehrern sowie -schülern das Lehren und Lernen von Musikinstrumenten – zum Start geht es ums Klavier – erleichtern. Dafür müssen die Nutzer das Musikstück, das geübt werden soll, scannen. HalbeStundeÜben erkennt die Noten und hilft beim Üben.

URL: www.halbestundeüben.de
Hashtags: #eLearning #Musik
Ort: Berlin
Gründer: Tiberius Treppner

swapface
Mit swapface wollen die Schwestern Lilia und Svanja Kleemann laut eigenen Worten “mehr Spaß in den Corona-Alltag bringen”. Über ihren noch sehr jungen Maskenshop verkaufen die Kölnerinnen deswegen nur “kreative, lustige Designs”. Darunter: Aufgespritzte Lippen und gepiercte Nasen.

URL: www.swapface.de
Hashtags: #eCommerce
Ort: Köln
Gründer: Lilia Kleemann, Svanja Kleemann

Marktkost
Das Startup Marktkost positioniert sich als “innovative Lösung für alle Unternehmen ohne Kantine”. Das Berliner Team nennt sein Konzept “Lunch as a Service”. Dabei setzt Marktkost auf ein flexibles Abo-Modell, individuelle Nutzerkonten und eine wöchentliche Lieferung der Mahlzeiten.

URL: www.marktkost.de
Hashtags: #Food #eCommerce
Ort: Berlin
Gründer: Laura-Maria Horn

H.O.P.E.
Das junge ClimateTech H.O.P.E. – steht ganz simpel für Humans On Planet Earth – versucht es mit einen spielerischen Ansatz in Sachen Klimaschutz. Die App aus Wiesbaden möchte viele Menschen zu mehr Klimafreundlichkeit inspirieren – etwa über Belohnungen und Challenges.

URL: www.humans-on-planet.earth
Hashtags: #ClimateTech
Ort: Wiesbaden
Gründer: Konrad Licht

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über junge, frische und brandneue Startups, die noch nicht jeder kennt. Alle diese Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der bundesweiten Startup-Szene und im besten Fall auf die Agenda von Investoren, Unternehmen und potenziellen Kooperationspartnern. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #booksana, #brandneu, #emmora, #h-o-p-e, #halbestundeuben, #marktkost, #plant-b, #startup-radar, #swapface, #vinventure

0

Berbix raises $9M for its identity verification platform

Berbix, an ID verification startup that was founded by former members of the Airbnb Trust and Safety team, today announced that it has raised a $9 million Series A round led by Mayfield. Existing investors, including Initialized Capital, Y Combinator and Fika Ventures, also participated in this round.

Founded in 2018, Berbix helps companies verify the identity of its users, with an emphasis on the cannabis industry, but it’s clearly not limited to this use case. Integrating the service to help online services scan and validate IDs only takes a few lines of code. In that respect, it’s not that different from payment services like Stripe, for example. Pricing starts at $99 per month with 100 included ID checks. Developers can choose a standard ID check (for $0.99 per check after the basic allotment runs out), as well as additional selfie and optional liveness checks, which ask users to show an emotion or move their head to ensure somebody isn’t simply trying to trick the system with a photo.

While ID verification may not be the first thing you think about in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, the company is actually seeing increasing demand for its solution now that in-person ID verification has become much harder. Berbix CEO and co-founder Steve Kirkham notes that the company now processes the same number of verifications in a day that it used to do monthly only a year ago.

“The inability to conduct traditional identity checks in person has forced organizations to move online for innumerable use cases,” he says in today’s announcement. “One example is the Family Independence Initiative, a nonprofit that trusts and invests in families’ own efforts to escape poverty. Our software has enabled them to eliminate fraudulent applications and focus on the families who have been economically affected by COVID.”

Berbix co-founder Eric Levine tells me the company plans to use the new funding to expand its team, especially the product and sales department. He also noted that the team is investing heavily in localization, as well as the technical foundation of the service. In addition, it’s obviously also investing in new technologies to detect new types of fraud. Scammers never sleep, after all.

#airbnb, #berbix, #fika-ventures, #hospitality-industry, #initialized-capital, #mayfield, #recent-funding, #security, #sharing-economy, #startups, #tc, #tourism, #travel, #vacation-rental, #y-combinator

0

After early-COVID layoffs, Hipcamp is buying competition, hiring

When shelter-in-place was first announced in the United States, most companies in the travel space saw bookings drop. Some shuttered. Hipcamp, a San Francisco-based startup that provides private land for people who want to go glamping or camping, found itself in a similar spot. (even though its entire sell is about getting you away from crowds).

“Bookings took a precipitous drop as people sheltered-in-place, and we actually encouraged people to cancel,” founder Alyssa Ravasio said in an interview. The startup conducted a round of layoffs back in April, citing ‘economic uncertainties.’ One employee tells TechCrunch that 60% of the company was laid off in two weeks. Hipcamp did not comment directly on the number of layoffs.

Months later, Hipcamp is in a far better spot. When stay-at-home orders lifted, bookings spiked with people eager to get outside, which the CDC says is a safer activity than being inside a place with less ventilation. Ravasio says that Hipcamp has even brought back some employees it originally laid off. The startup is currently hiring.

Off this new momentum, Hipcamp today announced that it has acquired Australia-based landsharing startup Youcamp, marking its first expansion into an international market. With the new business, Hipcamp will acquire Youcamp’s existing 50,000 listings, bringing its total to 420,000 listings.

Hipcamp declined to disclose the financials of the deal at this time.

Youcamp, founded by James Woodford, was born in New South Wales in 2013. Similar to Hipcamp, Youcamp worked to draw urban-based adults to the great outdoors. For its 7 years as an independent company, Youcamp racked up listings by working directly with private landowners.

Ravasio says she made her first big international bet in Australia partly because of revenue predictability.

“Expanding to the Southern Hemisphere also helps us account for natural seasonality with outdoor recreation. Between the US and Australia, it’s an endless summer,” the founder said.

The entire team at Youcamp will join Hipcamp, adding five to Hipcamp’s staff, bringing its employee base to a total of 35

Along with the acquisition announcement, Hipcamp shared that it is officially launching in Canada . The startup already had a number of Canadian hosts, but it will now increase the total by partnering directly with private landowners.

The company declined to share profitability or growth statistics, but instead pointing to aggregate usage numbers as some sort of cumulative revenue parallel. To date, Hipcamp has helped people spend 2.5 million nights outside across 6,000 hosts in the United States. Australia, and Canada.

In July 2019, Hipcamp got a tranche of new capital from investors, including but not limited to Andreessen Horowitz, Benchmark, Slow Ventures, Marcy Ventures (co-founded by Shawn Carter, or Jay-Z) and Dreamers Fund (co-founded by Will Smith). The round valued the startup at $127 million.

Hipcamp, which has been dubbed by the New Yorker the ‘Airbnb of the outdoors’, is more optimistic than it was in March, as shown by this appetite for acquisition. The progress mirrors what we’re seeing out of the actual Airbnb, which has found bookings increasing year over year as people look to stay at properties for local holidays.

#airbnb, #alyssa-ravasio, #andreessen-horowitz, #australia, #canada, #economy, #hipcamp, #san-francisco, #sharing-economy, #shawn-carter, #slow-ventures, #startup-company, #tc, #techcrunch, #travel, #united-states, #vacation-rental, #websites, #will-smith

0

Mastercard acquired and shut down IfOnly, an experiences marketplace hit by Covid-19

Travel has undoubtedly been one of the industries hardest hit in the coronavirus pandemic, constrained by restrictions on how people can move between and within countries, many venues closing, new rules to minimise gatherings, shrinking economies, and a general reluctance among consumers to engage in getting out and about. One startup in the space has been acquired in the wake of that.

IfOnly — an “experiences” marketplace based around access to exclusive, and often expensive, events and people, with a portion of the proceeds that a guest pays for the experience going towards good causes — was quietly acquired and shut down by credit giant Mastercard for an undisclosed sum. Mastercard told TechCrunch that it has folded the tech and team into Priceless — its own experiences marketplace — after initially leading a strategic investment in the company in 2018.

“At the end of last year, IfOnly, whose technology helps to power Priceless.com, became part of the Mastercard family, bringing their expertise and know-how in-house,” a spokesperson said. “The IfOnly platform will continue to help advance our Priceless strategy and our combined team will be even better positioned and equipped to deliver exclusive experiences for cardholders globally.”

IfOnly had been founded and previously led by Trevor Traina, a businessman, member of one of the wealthiest families in the US, and a well-connected Trump supporter. Traina eventually left the role of CEO when Trump appointed him ambassador to Austria in 2018. He was replaced by John Boris, who had been the CMO of Shutterfly. He still lists the CEO role of IfOnly as his current gig.

Mastercard had been just one of IfOnly’s big strategic investors; others were Hyatt Hotels, Sotheby’s and American Express, while financial backers investors included the likes of Founders Fund, NEA and Khosla. Together, investors had collectively put nearly $50 million into the startup. IfOnly was last valued at about $105 million, according to PitchBook data.

While Mastercard said that it had acquired the company at the beginning of the year, it turned out to be a soft landing for the startup, given the global turn of events and how it has impacted the travel industry.

It was only in July of this year that IfOnly had posted a notice on its site announcing the closure and acquisition. (A reader tipped us on the development last week.)

But before that, IfOnly’s business had ground to a halt in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. In the archived pages of the site (via the Internet Archive’s Wayback Machine) the company announced months ago that it would be pausing the availability of its experiences “due to the COVID-19 situation”, saying it would update as it learned more.

The sale (and closure) puts an end to a startup that began life with exclusive experiences that appeared to be aimed squarely at the one percent. One offer (on an archived page) for example offered “a family weekend feasting in Florence, Italy” starting at €62,851 (about $74,000) for four people, and tours of the Champagne region in France.

But the startup appeared to want to widen that out. Another offer included a session with the founders of “Goat Yoga” in Las Vegas for a private feeding and yoga session with baby goats (yes, this is a thing), starting at about $33 per person, depending on group numbers and presumably the number of goats and other parameters. Each experience was tied to a particular charity that would benefit from the purchase.

It also looks like IfOnly had also expanded into single, virtual experiences and those that could be bid on, both directly on its site and in partnership with auctioneers Sotheby’s. These included having customised voicemails created by Susan Sarandon, or bidding on a lunch with Mary Kay Place.

But the writing may have been on the wall, with the startup not formulating any kind of “plan B” on its site in the wake of the global health pandemic. Others that have built businesses around experiences — visiting places, going on tours, meeting famous people and doing other things to engage people in something new either close to home or further afield — have had to completely rethink their approach.

Airbnb — which had moved aggressively into experiences some years ago to complement and expand its accommodation booking platform — in April launched Airbnb Online Experiences, offering virtual tours and other video-based engagements to users.

GetYourGuide, the very well-capitalised Berlin-based startup offering unique tours and other travel-based experiences, has brought in pay cuts and reassessed its business model essentially around the idea of writing off 2020 (that is, assuming no one books for this year), in hopes of a turnaround in the longer term.

Meanwhile, Klook resorted to cutting staff. And yet others like Omaze — which like IfOnly also ties in its experiences with raising money for charity — are still raising money and operating, albeit currently needing to delay some of the experiences they’re selling.

For Mastercard, the Priceless platform is part of the company’s wider efforts to expand its business beyond basic card services. (That’s something that has seen companies like Mastercard, Visa and Amex expand into services for businesses, too, such as Mastercard’s purchase of B2B payments company Nets, and Amex’s purchase of SMB loans platform Kabbage.) Services like Priceless also help Mastercard create more brand loyalty with its customers, and to potentially make better revenues per user through more direct retailing.

As with other experience purveyors like Airbnb, it seems like the Priceless offerings have moved into the completely virtual sphere, selling people a chance to meet sports celebrities online, go backstage at famous theatres, and learn how to mix drinks with well-known mixologists. These may now be powered by IfOnly, but only in part: the option to give to charities doesn’t appear to have carried over with the deal.

#ecommerce, #experiences, #ifonly, #ma, #mastercard, #tc, #travel

0

Airbnb declares all parties over indefinitely at its listings

Airbnb has been implementing measures to help limit hosting of unauthorized parties at listings booked through its platform, and today it implemented the strictest of all: A global ban on all parties and events. This includes an occupancy cap of 16 guests max at even the largest of the listings available on its platform, and the ban is “in effect indefinitely until further notice” according to the company.

The company notes that “unauthorized parties” have always been against its rules, even though it previously allowed hosts on its platform to selectively authorize small parties depending on their own assessment of whether they would be okay with that given the size of their house, and the comfort level of the surrounding neighborhood.

In its posted explanation of the rule change, Airbnb cites the global COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing as a contributing factor to updated rules around group gatherings, including removing specific flags encouraging use of listings as party venues from its search tools. Simultaneously, they also added a policy that requires both hosts and guests to follow local health agency guidelines around COVID-19 prevention measures, which the company says amounted to what was “effectively […] a form-fitting, patchwork ban on parties and events.”

Airbnb says that while that seemed to be sufficient at the time to encourage responsible and safe behavior, changing regional guidelines have meant that they’ve seen an increase in some individuals on their platform to turn listings into defect bars and clubs – hence the introduction of this new global ban, which is designed “in the best interest of public health.”

In terms of specifics, the guideline explicitly profits parties on all future bookings, and adds the 16 occupant cap. Airbnb is working on creating some kind of exception process for boutique hotels and other similar properties that make use of its platform for bookings. Meanwhile, Airbnb is working on process for informing guests of the party rules and that they open themselves up to potentially legal action if found to be in violation of the restriction.

Airbnb does not mention recent killings at rentals arranged through its platform, including one in Toronto in February in which three people were killed, and the California shooting last Halloween in which five people died. That incident in October 2019 prompted the ‘party house’ ban that Airbnb then implemented, while the incident from February prompted calls for further action.

#airbnb, #coronavirus, #covid-19, #health, #sharing-economy, #tc, #travel, #vacation-rental

0

#Brandneu – 8 neue Startups, die eure Aufmerksamkeit verdient haben


Jeden Tag entstehen überall in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz neue Startups. deutsche-startups.de präsentiert an dieser Stelle wieder einmal einige ganz junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Tagen, Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind sowie einige junge Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind und erstmals für Schlagzeilen gesorgt haben.

Taste at Home
Das Hamburger Startup Taste at Home bringt die klassische Weinprobe ins heimische Wohnzimmer. Unter Anleitung eines Sommelier können die Nutzer der Jungfirma “die besten Tropfen direkt bei sich Zuhause genießen”. Der Spaß geht ab 39 Euro pro Teilnehmer los.

URL: www.tasteathome.de
Hashtags: #Food #eCommerce
Ort: Hamburg
Gründer: Patrick Kosmala

Mentify
Hinter Mentify verbirgt sich eine E-Learning Plattform für Startups. Die Jungfirma will
“Praxiswissen aus erster Hand von Deutschlands erfolgreichsten Unternehmern, Investoren und Startup-Experten” vermitteln. Das Projekt wird von den PitchGuru-Machern aus Dortmund vorangetrieben.

URL: www.mentify.education
Hashtags:#eLearning
Ort: Dortmund
Gründer: Marius Schreiber, Jannik Müller

re:ignite
Bei re:ignite können sich Gamer plattformübergreifend vernetzen. “Wir sind dein Social Hub, in dem alles rund ums Gaming im Mittelpunkt steht”, teilt Gründer Johannes Herbig mit. Dabei ist es egal, ob es um “Clans, Gilden oder einfach Feierabend-Gaming-Gruppen” geht.

URL: www.reignite.gg
Hashtags:
Ort: Chemnitz
Gründer: Johannes Herbig

TravelTermin
Bei TravelTermin geht es um Terminvereinbarungen. Zielgruppe sind dabei Reisebüros. Das Startup, hinter dem StepMap-Macher Veit Spiegelberg steckt, verspricht seinen Kunden einen “schnellen und einfachen Weg, um Kunden Terminvereinbarungen anzubieten!”

URL: www.traveltermin.de
Hashtags: #Tool #Travel
Ort: Berlin
Gründer: Veit Spiegelberg

heyOrder
Mit der App von heyOrder kann jeder im Restaurant seiner Wahl mit seinem Smartphone Getränke und Speisen bestellen. Dazu muss man zum Start etwa einen QR-Code am Tisch scannen. Auch die Bezahlung ist über die App möglich. Und es gibt sogar einen Bewirtungsbeleg.

URL: www.heyorder.com
Hashtags:#App #Payment
Ort: Hannover
Gründer: Sean-Andre Steinke, Vincenzo Vazzano

SchulGold
SchulGold will Schülern den Umgang mit Geld beibringen. “Unsere Online-Programme sind auf die unterschiedlichen Bedürfnisse und Lernstile der Schüler zugeschnitten”, heißt es auf der Website. Hinter dem Projekt steckt unter anderem FinMarie-Macherin Karolina Decker.

URL: www.schulgold.com
Hashtags: #eLearning
Ort: Berlin
Gründer: Karolina Decker, Babett Mahnert

Juno
Mit Juno setzt das Gründerehepaar Werner Hoier und Dorothea Utzt (früher Streetspotr) auf ein digitales Erinnerungsalbum für Kinder. Die App erinnert die Eltern unter anderem daran Momente analog zum Alter des Kindes festzuhalten. Das Besondere an Juno ist die integrierte und automatisierte Druckoption.

URL: www.junoapp.co
Hashtags: #App
Ort: Nürnberg
Gründer: Werner Hoier, Dorothea Utzt

The Cylcleverse
Bei The Cylcleverse dreht sich alles um Fahhrräder. Gründer Christian Dauelsberg beschreibt die Plattform als “Fahrrad-Suchmaschine”. Auf der Website finden Onliner Produkte und Gadgets, Rad- und Sportreisen, sowie digitale Angebote aus verschiedenen Online-Shops und von vielen Marken.

URL: www.thecycleverse.com
Hashtags: #eCommerce
Ort: Hamburg
Gründer: Christian Dauelsberg

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über junge, frische und brandneue Startups, die noch nicht jeder kennt. Alle diese Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der bundesweiten Startup-Szene und im besten Fall auf die Agenda von Investoren, Unternehmen und potenziellen Kooperationspartnern. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #brandneu, #heyorder, #juno, #mentify, #reignite, #schulgold, #startup-radar, #taste-at-home, #the-cylcleverse, #traveltermin

0

#DealMonitor – Travel-Startup Omio sammelt 100 Millionen ein


Im aktuellen #DealMonitor für den 19. August werfen wir wieder einen Blick auf die wichtigsten, spannendsten und interessantesten Investments und Exits des Tages. Alle Deals der Vortage gibt es im großen und übersichtlichen #DealMonitor-Archiv.

INVESTMENTS

Omio
+++ Temasek, Kinnevik, Goldman Sachs, NEA und Kleiner Perkins investieren 100 Millionen US-Dollar in das Berliner Travel-Startup Omio. “Mit dem zusätzlichen Kapital kann sich Omio weiter auf seine Vision fokussieren, das globales Reisen für den Kunden so einfach wie möglich zu gestalten. Die Mittel sollen für das fortgesetzte organische Wachstum sowie opportunistische M&A-Aktivitäten verwendet werden, um so das einzigartige Produkt- und Dienstleistungsangebot des Unternehmens weiter zu stärken”, teilt das Startup mit. Omio gehört damit weiter zu den ganz großen Wetten in der Berliner Startup-Szene. In den vergangenen Jahren pumpten Investoren schon fast 300 Millionen Dollar in das Unternehmen, das früher als GoEuro bekannt war. Derzeit wirken 350 Mitarbeter für die Reiseplattform über die Nutzer Bahn-, Bus- sowie Flugtickets vergleichen und auch buchen können. Während der Corona-Krise dürfte die Jungfirma arg gelitten haben. Inzwischen sieht aber wieder gut aus bei Omio: “Insbesondere in Deutschland und Frankreich liegen wir trotz geringer Marketingausgaben bereits wieder bei über 50 Prozent verglichen mit unseren Buchungen vor Covid-19”.

Element 
+++ Sony Financial Ventures und der japanische Geldgeber Global Brain sowie Finleap, das Versorgungswerk der Zahnärztekammer Berlin und SBI Investment investieren 10 Millionen Euro in Element – siehe FinanceFWD. Signal Iduna, Finleap, Engel & Völkers Capital, SBI Investment und Alma Mundi Ventures investierten zuletzt 23 Millionen in Element, einen Zulieferer von digitalen Versicherungsprodukten. Zielgruppe der Jungfirma, die 2017 von Finleap angeschoben wurde, sind andere Startups, etablierte Unternehmen, Händler und auch bestehende Versicherer.

Siegfried Gin
+++ Der Spirituosenhersteller Diageo investiert über den unabhängigen Accelerator Distill Ventures in Rheinland Distillers, dem Unternehmen hinter Siegfried Rheinland Dry Gin. “Wie bei allen Unternehmen, die mit Distill Ventures zusammenarbeiten, bleiben die Gründer von Rheinland Distillers Mehrheitseigentümer, während Diageo eine Minderheitsbeteiligung hält”, teilt das Unternehmen mit. Rheinland Distillers wurde 2014 gegründet.

EXITS

BSI
Die Schweizer Beteiligungsgesellschaft Capvis übernimmt die Mehrheit an der Badener Firma BSI Business Systems Integration, einem Anbieter von Softwarelösungen für Customer Relationship Management (CRM). “Das BSI Team um Jens Thuesen, Christian Rusche und Markus Brunold bleibt investiert und setzt seine erfolgreiche Arbeit zusammen mit Capvis fort”, teilt das Unternehmen mit. BSI wurde 1996 in der Schweiz gegründet und beschäftigt über 320 Mitarbeiter an Standorten in Baar, Baden, Bern, Darmstadt, Düsseldorf, Hamburg, München und Zürich.

Achtung! Wir freuen uns über Tipps, Infos und Hinweise, was wir in unserem #DealMonitor alles so aufgreifen sollten. Schreibt uns eure Vorschläge entweder ganz klassisch per E-Mail oder nutzt unsere “Stille Post“, unseren Briefkasten für Insider-Infos.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): azrael74

#aktuell, #b2b, #berlin, #bsi, #capvis, #diageo, #distill-ventures, #element, #emasek, #finleap, #goldman-sachs, #insurtech, #kinnevik, #kleiner-perkins, #nea, #omio, #rheinland-distillers, #siegfried-gin, #travel, #venture-capital

0

Omio takes $100M to shuttle through the coronavirus crisis

Multimodal travel platform Omio (formerly GoEuro) has raised $100M in late stage funding to help see its business through the coronavirus crisis. It also says it’s eyeing potential M&A opportunities within the hard-hit sector.

New and existing investors in the Berlin -based startup participated in the late stage convertible note, although omio isn’t disclosing any new names. Among the list of returning investors are: Temasek, Kinnevik, Goldman Sachs, NEA and Kleiner Perkins. Omio’s business has now pulled in around $400M in total since being founded back in 2013 — with the prior raise being a $150M round back in 2018.

In a supporting statement on the latest raise, Georgi Ganev, CEO of Kinnevik, said: “We are very impressed how fast and effective Omio adapted to such an unprecedented crisis for the global travel industry. The management team has delivered quickly and we can see the robustness of the business model which is well diversified across markets and transport modes. We are looking forward to supporting Omio on its way to become the go-to destination for travellers across the world.”

While COVID-19 has thrown up major headwinds to global tourism and travel — with foreign trips discouraged by specific government quarantine requirements, and the overarching requirement for people to maintain social distancing meaning certain types of holidays or activities are less attractive or even feasible, Omio is nonetheless sounding upbeat — reporting a partial recovery in bookings this summer in Europe.

In Germany and France it says bookings are above 50% of the pre-COVID-19 level at this point, despite only “marginal” marketing spend over the crisis period.

Its business is likely better positioned than some in the travel space to adapt to changes in how people are moving around and holidaying, given it caters to multiple modes of transport. The travel aggregator platform spans flights, rail, buses and even ferry routes, allowing users to quickly compare different modes of transport for their planned journey.

More recently Omio has added car sharing and car rentals to its platform, including via a partnership with rentalcars.com. So as travellers in Europe have adapted to living with COVID-19 — perhaps opting to take more local trips and/or avoiding mass transit when they go on holiday — it’s in a strong position to cater to changing demand through its partnerships with ground transportation networks and providers.

“That diversification in terms of not depending on a single mode of transport has really helped the business come back much stronger, because we’re not depending on — for example — air or bus,” CEO and founder Naren Shaam tells TechCrunch. “The diversification has helped us.”

“People will travel a lot more to smaller regions, explore the countryside a little more,” he predicts, suggesting the current dilution of travel focus it’s seeing — away from usual tourist hotspot destinations in favor of a broader, more rural mix of places — augurs a wider shift to more a diversified, more sustainable type of travel being here to stay.

“It’s not longer just airport to airport travel,” he notes. “People are traveling to where they want to go — and it’s a lot more distributed across geographies, where people want to explore. A platform like ours can accelerate this behaviour because we serve, not just flights, but trains, buses, even ferries etc, you can actually reach any destination with us.”

Direct booking via Omio’s platform is possible where it has partner agreements in place (so not universally across all routes, though it may still be able to offer route planning info).

Its multimodal booking mix extends to 37 countries in Europe and North America — where it launched at the start of this year. Last year it acquired Rome2Rio, bulking out its global flight and transport planning inventory. The grand vision is “all transport, end to end, in a single product”, as Shaam puts it — although executing on that means continuing to build out partnerships and integrations across its market footprint. 

Asked whether the new funding will give Omio enough headroom to see it through the current coronavirus crisis, Shaam tells TechCrunch: “The unknown unknown is how long the crisis lasts. But as we can see if the crisis lasts a couple of years we will make it through that.”

He says the raise will help the business come out of the crisis “stronger” — by enabling Omio to spend on adapting its product to meet changing consumer demand, such as the shift to ground transportation. “All of those things we can use these capital to shape the future of how the travel industry actually interacts with consumers,” he suggests.

Another shift in the industry that’s been triggered by the coronavirus relates to consumer expectations around information. In short, people expect a lot more travel intel up front.

“We have hypotheses on what comes back [post-crisis]. I think travel will be a lot more information centric, especially coming out of COVID-19. Customers will seek clarity in the near term around basic information around what regions can I travel to, do I need to quarantine, do I need to wear a mask inside the train etc,” he says.

“But that’ll drive a type of consumer behavior where they are seeking more information and companies will need to provide this information to satisfy the consumer needs of the future. Because consumers are getting used to having relevant information at the right point in time. So it’s not a data dump of all information… it’s when I get to the train station, what do I need to do?

“Each of those is almost hyperlocal in terms of information and that’s going to drive a change in consumer behaviour.”

Omio’s initial response to this need for more information up front was the launch of a hub — called the Open Travel Index — where users can look up information on restrictions related to specific destinations to help them plan their journey.

However he admits it’s a struggle to keep up with requirements that can switch over night (in one recent example, the UK added France to a list of countries from which returning travellers must self quarantine for two weeks — leading to a mad dash by scores of holidaymakers trying to beat a 4am deadline to get back on UK soil).

“This is a product we launched about a month and a half ago that tells you, if you’re based in the UK, where you can go in Europe,” he says. “We need to update it faster because information’s changing very, very quickly — so it’s on us now to figure out how to keep up with the constant changes of information.”

Discussing other COVID-19 changes, Shaam points to the shift to apps that’s being accelerated by the public health crisis — a trend that’s being replicated in multiple industries of course, not just travel.

“More than half of the ground transport industry was booked at a kiosk at a station [before COVID-19]. So this will drive a clear change with people uncomfortable touching a kiosk button,” he adds, arguing that that shift will help create better consumer products in the sector.

“If you imagine the kind of consumer products that the app/web world has created you can imagine that should come to the consumer experiences in travel,” he suggests. “So these are the things, I think, that will come in terms of consumer behavior and it’s up to us to make sure that we lead that change as a company.”

“We’re investing quite heavily in some of the other shifts that we’re seeing — in terms of days to departure, flexibility of fares, more insurance type products so you can cancel,” he adds. “We’re also trying to help customers in terms of whether they can go.

“We’re investing heavily in routing so you can connect modes of transport, not just flights, so you can travel longer distances with just trains. And we’re also in talks with all our suppliers to say hey, how can we help you come back — because not all suppliers are state monopolies. There’s a lot of small, medium suppliers on our product and we want to bring them back as well so we’re investing there as well.”

On M&A, Shaam says growth via acquisition is “definitely on the radar for us”. Though he also says it’s not top of the priority list right now.

“We’ve actively got our ears out. More so now, going forward, than looking back — because the last four months, imagine what we went through as a travel company, I just wanted to stablize that situation and bring us to a stable position,” he says.

“We are still in COVID-19. The situation’s not yet over, so our primary goal coming out of this is very much investing in the shifts in consumer behavior in our core product… Any M&A acquisitions we’ll do is more opportunistic, based on [factors like] pricing and what’s happening in the industry.

“But more of our capital and my time and everything will go a lot more to build the future of transport. Because that’s going to change so much more for so many millions of consumers that use our product today.”

There is still plenty of work that can be done on Omio’s core proposition — aka, linking up natural travel search for consumers by knitting together a diverse mix and range of service providers in a way that shrinks the strain of travel planning, and building out support for even more multifaceted trips people might wish to take in future.

“No one brings the natural search for consumers. Consumers just want to go London to Portsmouth. They don’t say ‘London Portsmouth train’. They do that today because that’s what the industry forces them to do — so by enabling this core product to work where you can search any modes of transport, anywhere in Europe, one click to buy, everything is a simple, mobile ticket, and you use the whole product on the app — that’s the big driver for the industry,” Shaam adds.

“On top of that you’ve got shifts towards ground transport, shifts towards app, shifts towards sustainability, which is a big topic — even pre-COVID-19 — that we can actually help drive even more change coming out of this. These are the bigger opportunities for us.”

Uncertainty clearly remains a constant for the travel sector now that COVID-19 has become a terrible ‘new normal’. So even with an unexpected summer travel bump in Europe it remains to be seen what will happen in the coming months as the region moves from summer to winter.

“In general the overall business outlook we’re taking is purely something of more caution,” says Shaam. “We just don’t know. Anything at all with respect to COVID-19, no one knows, basically. I’ve seen a number of reports in the industry but no one really knows. So in general our outlook is one of caution. And that’s why we were surprised in our uptick already through the summer. We didn’t even expect that kind of growth with near zero marketing spend levels.”

“We’ll adapt,” he adds. “The business is high variable costs so we can scale up and down fairly easily, so it’s asset light and these things help us adapt. And let’s see what happens in the winter.”

Over in the US — where Omio happened to launch slightly ahead of the COVID-19 crisis — he says it’s been a very different story, with no bookings bump. “No surprise, given the situation there,” he says, emphasizing the importance of government interventions to help control the spread of the virus.

“Governments play a very important role here. Europe has done a superior job compared to a lot of other regions in the world… But entire economies [in the region] depend on tourism,” he says. “Hopefully entire [European] countries shouldn’t go into shutdowns again because the systems are strong enough to identify local spike in cases and they ring fence it very quickly and can act on it. It’s the same as us as a company. If there’s a second wave we know how to react because we’ve gone through this horrible phrase one… So using those learnings and applying them quickly I think will help stabilize the industry as a whole.”

#berlin, #car-rentals, #car-sharing, #consumer-products, #coronavirus, #covid-19, #europe, #france, #fundings-exits, #germany, #goeuro, #goldman-sachs, #kinnevik, #kleiner-perkins, #london, #ma, #naren-shaam, #nea, #north-america, #omio, #rome2rio, #tc, #temasek, #transport, #transportation, #travel, #travel-industry, #united-kingdom, #united-states

0

Traveloka tops up with $250M amid the coronavirus crisis

Indonesia-based online travel portal, Traveloka, has picked up $250M in fresh funding to beef up its coronavirus-battered balance sheet.

The travel aggregator dubs the capital injection a “strong vote of confidence” in its strategy to adjust to what it couches as a ‘new normal’ for travel by retooling its focus on domestic and short hop excursions and activities. The funding round is led by an unnamed global financial institution. Traveloka also says “some” existing investors also participated (EV Growth being one it has named).

Prior to this latest raise, Traveloka had pulled in around $950M across five funding rounds since being founded back in 2012, according to Crunchbase. Back in 2017 it passed unicorn valuation after bagging $350 million from Expedia in exchange for a minority stake in the business. But, shortly afterwards, it lost one of its co-founders — who departed citing a clash of goals as the business switched to more of a commercial mindset, as he saw it.

Fast forward a few years and the pandemic is playing havoc with the travel industry as a whole. Since the pandemic landed to decimate ‘business as usual’ in the sector, Traveloka has responded by launching a number of initiatives in a bid to reassure and woo back customers — including flights that bundle COVID-19 tests; flexible open-date vouchers for hotels (aka, ‘Buy Now Stay Later’); online experiences; flash sale livestreams; and a big push around cleanliness with standardized hygiene protocols for vacation accommodation that can be booked via its platform.

Traveloka says the latest capital injection will be used not only to beef up its balance sheet but to boost efforts and deepen offerings in “select priority areas” — including building out what it describes as “a more robust and integrated Travel & Lifestyle portfolio” in key markets.

It also intends to expand financial services solutions it offers to ecosystem partners.

Commenting in a statement, Ferry Unardi, Traveloka co-founder and CEO, said: “Without a doubt, Traveloka has been profoundly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. We have experienced the lowest business rate that we have ever seen since our inception. However, we always believed that the company will prevail by rapidly adjusting our strategy, working with our industry and ecosystem partners, as well as continuing to innovate for our users, our ultimate focus.”

Per Ferry, Traveloka’s business in Vietnam is “approaching” steady pre-COVID-19 levels, while he says its Thailand business is “on its way” to surpassing 50%.

“Indonesia and Malaysia are still in the early stage, but they continue to demonstrate promising momentum with strong week-to-week improvement, especially in accommodation with the emergence of shorter distance staycation behavior,” he added. “We acknowledge that the sector may go through further turbulence as it navigates new waves, but we feel we are prepared to take on the challenge and emerge on the right side of it.”

“The travel industry is facing unprecedented times, including Traveloka,” added Willson Cuaca, managing partner of EV Growth, in another supporting statement. “The leadership team has taken difficult yet commendable measures including restructuring and optimization to minimize financial health risks. We are confident that the company will emerge even stronger after this crisis.”

#asia, #coronavirus, #covid-19, #ev-growth, #expedia, #indonesia, #malaysia, #recent-funding, #startups, #staycation, #thailand, #tourism, #travel, #travel-industry, #traveloka, #vietnam, #willson-cuaca

0

#Brandneu – 8 neue Startups, die wir ganz genau beobachten


Jeden Tag entstehen überall in Deutschland, Österreich und der Schweiz neue Startups. deutsche-startups.de präsentiert an dieser Stelle wieder einmal einige ganz junge Startups, die zuletzt, also in den vergangenen Tagen, Wochen und Monaten an den Start gegangen sind sowie einige junge Firmen, die zuletzt aus dem Stealth-Mode erwacht sind und erstmals für Schlagzeilen gesorgt haben.

Ren-One
Bei Ren-One können Hersteller ihre eigene Erzeugnisse präsentieren und den Menschen aus ihrer Region zum Kauf anbieten. Zielgruppe sind Bauernhöfe, mittelständige Unternehmen, die eigene Erzeugnisse verkaufen, Privatpersonen und Gewerbetreibende, die selbst produzieren.

URL: www.ren-one.eu
Hashtags: #eCommerce #Nachhaltigkeit
Ort:Dortmund
Gründer: Boris Rosenberg, Eugen Davidovski

pickar
Über die digitale Studienberatung pickar können Onliner “das ideale Studium” finden. Dabei fließen durch eine “psychometrische Online-Analyse” die Persönlichkeit und die Interesseren der Nutzer in die Empfehlungen ein. Anschließt hilft das Startup noch bei der Suche nach der passenden Uni.

URL: www.pickar.ai
Hashtags: #Studenten #Tool
Ort: Seefeld
Gründer: Julian Willner, Thassilo Seeboth

ryddle
Die Hamburger Jungfirma ryddle setzt auf digitale Stadtrallyes. Zum Konzept: “Bei den Rallyes geht es nicht nur darum, Rätsel zu lösen, die Spieler tauchen gleichzeitig in eine spannende Geschichte ein und bekommen interessante Hintergrundinformationen zu den HotSpots und dem jeweiligen Stadtteil”.

URL: www.ryddle.de
Hashtags: #Gaming #Travel
Ort: Hamburg
Gründer: Timo Mandler, Martha de Vries, Jan-Frederik Gräve, Verena Mathews

Talentmagnet
Das Motto von Talentmagnet lautet: “3 Top-Bewerber in 14 Tagen auf dem Silbertablett”. Das HR-Startup aus Hamburg will dies mittels “Performance-Marketing-Techniken aus dem E-Commerce in Kombination mit selbstlernenden Algorithmen und einem smarten Qualifizierungs-Quiz” stemmen.

URL: www.talentmagnet.io
Hashtags: #HR
Ort: Hamburg
Gründer: Michael Asshauer

Dynamic Video
Das Allgäuer Startup Dynamic Video bietet mit Mozaik eine App an, mit der Unternehmen “einfach, günstig und professionell Businessvideos erstellen können”. Zum Start gibt es unter anderem Vorlagen für Produktvideos, Erklärvideos, Coachingvideos und Fahrzeugpräsentation.

URL: www.dynamic-video.de
Hashtags: #App #Video #B2B
Ort: Aitrang
Gründer: David Knöbl, Neele de Vries

Living Lifestyle
Die junge Plattform Living Lifestyle will Menschen helfen, das passende Zuhause zu finden. Und damit ist nicht nur die passende Wohnung gemeint, sondern auch das passende Umfeld. Im besten Fall eine Nachbarschaft wie die, in der man vorher gelebt hat. Einige Tools wie ein Umzugshelfer runden das Angebot ab.

URL: www.livinglifestyle.de
Hashtags: #PropTech
Ort: Berlin
Gründer: Thomas Gawlitta

Moanah
Die Jungfirma Moanah bietet Reinigungsmittel in Glasflaschen – samt einem Refill-System an. Die Sprühflaschen des Startups kann jeder zu Hause befüllen und mit Wasser auffüllen. “Sobald die Konzentrate leer sind, können sie nachbestellt werden”, heißt es auf der Website.

URL: www.moanah.com
Hashtags: #eCommerce #Nachhaltigkeit
Ort: Mannheim
Gründer: Salar Armakan, Felix Kleinhenz

purapep
Hinter purapep verbergen sich “funktionale Futterergänzungen auf Molkenbasis für Hunde und Katzen”. Die Ausgründung der Professur für Lebensmittelchemie der TU Dresden, setzt dabei auf “Natürlichkeit und eine soliden wissenschaftlichen Basis für alle eingesetzten Inhaltsstoffe”.

URL: www.purapep.de
Hashtags: #Food
Ort:Dresden
Gründer: Diana Hagemann, Julia Degen

Tipp: In unserem Newsletter Startup-Radar berichten wir einmal in der Woche über junge, frische und brandneue Startups, die noch nicht jeder kennt. Alle diese Startups stellen wir in unserem kostenpflichtigen Newsletter kurz und knapp vor und bringen sie so auf den Radar der bundesweiten Startup-Szene und im besten Fall auf die Agenda von Investoren, Unternehmen und potenziellen Kooperationspartnern. Jetzt unseren Newsletter Startup-Radar sofort abonnieren!

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #brandneu, #dynamic-video, #living-lifestyle, #moanah, #purapep, #ren-one-pickar, #ryddle, #startup-radar, #talentmagnet

0

#Zahlencheck – HomeToGo wächst auf 52,7 Millionen Umsatz – Verlust: 17,8 Millionen


In den vergangenen Jahren flossen 150 Millionen US-Dollar in HomeToGo – unter anderem von Insight Venture Partners, Lakestar, Acton Capital Partners und DN Capital. Die Bewertung der Suchmaschine für Ferienunterkünfte, die 2014 von Wolfgang Heigl, Patrick Andrä und Nils Regge gegründet wurde, soll zuletzt bei 400 Millionen Euro gelegen haben (Post-Money). Der brandneue Jahresabschluss ermöglicht nun wieder einen Blick auf die Zahlen der Jungfirma. 2018 erwirtschaftete das Unternehmen einen Umsatz in Höhe von 52,7 Millionen Euro. Im Vergleich zum Vorjahr bedeutet dies ein Plus von 44 %. “Maßgeblich getrieben wird der Umsatz durch die Expansion in neue Absatzmärkte (Länder) und die Ausweitung der Werbemaßnahmen”, teilt das Unternehmen mit.

Der Jahresfehlbetrag von HomeToGo stieg gleichzeitig auf 17,8 Millionen Euro. Im Vorjahr waren es nur 13,4 Millionen. Insgesamt kostete der Aufbau von HomeToGo bereits 39,5 Millionen. Auch für das inzwischen abgelaufene Jahr 2019 rechnete das Unternehmen weitere mit Verlusten: “Die weiterhin steigende Popularität des Ferienhausurlaubs als relativ kostengünstige Urlaubsart sollte unser Geschäft zusätzlich positiv beeinflussen. Nichtsdestotrotz erwarten wir aufgrund der Investitionen auch in 2019 einen moderaten Jahresfehlbetrag auf HomeToGo Ebene und eine leichte Steigerung auf Konzernebene, der im Vergleich zu 2018 aufgrund einer angestrebten höheren Marketingeffizienz voraussichtlich unterproportional zu den Umsatzzuwächsen ansteigen wird”.

2018 wirkten durchschnittliche rund 95 Mitarbeiter für HomeToGo. Im Vorjahr waren es 91. “Der Personalaufwand ist um T€ 1.553 auf T€ 5.004 angestiegen. Grund für den gestiegenen Personalaufwand sind u. a. seit Q3/2017 kontinuierlich erfolgte Neueinstellungen von Vollzeit-Mitarbeitern (bei gleichzeitigem Rückgang der als “Werkstudenten” angestellten Mitarbeiter), die aufgrund der höheren Stundenanzahl einen höheren Personalaufwand erzeugen. Viele der neueingestellten Mitarbeiter haben aufgrund ihrer Erfahrung zudem ein höheres Gehaltsniveau. Daneben gab es übliche Gehaltserhöhungen für bestehende Mitarbeiter”, teilt das Unternehmen dazu mit.

Fakten aus dem Jahresabschluss 2018
* Im Geschäftsjahr 2018 konnte der Umsatz von T€ 36.561 im Vorjahr auf T€ 52.714 und damit um 44 % gesteigert werden. Maßgeblich getrieben wird der Umsatz durch die Expansion in neue Absatzmärkte (Länder) und die Ausweitung der Werbemaßnahmen.

  • Der Personalaufwand ist um T€ 1.553 auf T€ 5.004 angestiegen. Grund für den gestiegenen Personalaufwand sind u. a. seit Q3/2017 kontinuierlich erfolgte Neueinstellungen von Vollzeit-Mitarbeitern (bei gleichzeitigem Rückgang der als “Werkstudenten” angestellten Mitarbeiter), die aufgrund der höheren Stundenanzahl einen höheren Personalaufwand erzeugen. Viele der neueingestellten Mitarbeiter haben aufgrund ihrer Erfahrung zudem ein höheres Gehaltsniveau. Daneben gab es übliche Gehaltserhöhungen für bestehende Mitarbeiter.

* Zum 31. Dezember 2018 verfügte die Gesellschaft über liquide Mittel in Höhe von T€ 40.431 gegenüber T€ 13.826 im Vorjahr. Grund für den Anstieg ist v. a. eine in 2018 erfolgte Finanzierungsrunde der Altgesellschafter und neuer Gesellschafter.

  • Zusammenfassend ist für 2018 festzustellen, dass das Ergebnis innerhalb der Erwartung lag und die Gesamtlage des Unternehmens positiv einzustufen ist. Auch lassen bereits in 2018 eingeleitete Maßnahmen einen positiven Geschäftsverlauf für 2019 erwarten.

* Zum 31.12.2019 wird die Gesellschaft zum ersten Mal einen Konzernabschluss aufstellen. Für den Konzern gehen wir in 2019 von einem deutlichen Umsatzwachstum im zweistelligen Prozentbereich auf Konzernebene aus. Grund hierfür sind die liquiden Mittel aus der in 2018 abgeschlossenen Finanzierungsrunde, die es uns erlauben, weiterhin in unsere Technologie, in Personal und v. a. in Werbung zu investieren und damit neue Nutzer für unsere Plattform zu gewinnen und bestehende Nutzer weiter zu binden.
* Nichtsdestotrotz erwarten wir aufgrund der Investitionen auch in 2019 einen moderaten Jahresfehlbetrag auf HomeToGo Ebene und eine leichte Steigerung auf Konzernebene, der im Vergleich zu 2018 aufgrund einer angestrebten höheren Marketingeffizienz voraussichtlich unterproportional zu den Umsatzzuwächsen ansteigen wird.

HomeToGo im Zahlencheck

2018: 52,7 Millionen Euro (Umsatz); 17,8 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)
2017
: 36,6 Millionen Euro (Umsatz); 13,4 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)
2016: 11,9 Millionen Euro (Umsatz); 8,2 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)
2015: 4,2 Millionen Euro (Jahresfehlbetrag)

Im Geschäftsjahr 2018 konnte der Umsatz von T€ 36.561 im Vorjahr auf T€14 und damit um 44 % gesteigert werden. Maßgeblich getrieben wird der Umsatz durch die Expansion in neue Absatzmärkte (Länder) und die Ausweitung der Werbemaßnahmen.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): HomeToGo

#aktuell, #berlin, #hometogo, #reloaded, #travel, #zahlencheck

0

COVID-19 pivot: Travel unicorn Klook sees jump in staycations

Spring 2020 was gloomy for Klook. As countries closed their borders and went into complete or partial lockdown, the SoftBank-backed travel platform saw its revenue plummet by as much as 90% through March and April. The World Travel and Tourism Council said in April that the coronavirus could put up to 100 million jobs in the global travel and tourism at risk.

But in the dark times, opportunities were also bubbling up.

Six-year-old Klook enables travelers, primarily from Asia, to discover and book overseas experiences ranging from Napa Valley wine tastings to staying with a farming family in Cambodia — a bit like Airbnb Experiences. It then takes a cut from each transaction that happens between the customer and activity vendor.

Before COVID-19, the startup, which crossed the $1 billion valuation mark back in 2018, was seeing 30 million monthly user sessions a month; by April, the figure shrank to 5 million. The constraints on people’s movement across the world, which is the foundation of its business, forced Klook to quickly rethink product offerings.

“At the end of the day, we are in the business of fun things to do. There are things to do at home, as well as local things to do when people could travel,” co-founder and chief operating officer Eric Gnock Fah told TechCrunch over a phone interview. “Now [the pandemic] is giving us an opportunity to add a new aspect to it.”

Staycation

Cooped up at home, people around the world turned to cooking, handcraft and other domestic projects as an outlet for entertainment and creativity. Klook responded to the demand by offering do-it-yourself kits for making bubble tea, macarons, candles and more — and delivering the material to people’s doorsteps. For people who were still eager to see the world, Klook partnered with landmark sites worldwide on online virtual tours, amassing close to 660,000 views in its first two livestreamed experiences.

#asia, #china, #coronavirus, #covid-19, #ecommerce, #extra-crunch, #klook, #market-analysis, #pandemic, #social, #startups, #tourism, #travel

0

Even amid the pandemic, this newly funded travel startup is tackling the stodgy timeshare market

The world is rife with me-too startups, which makes it all the more refreshing when a founder comes along that manages to find a broken market that’s hiding in plain sight.

That’s what Mike Kennedy appears to be doing with Koala, a young outfit determined to update the stodgy world of property time-share management, wherein people acquire points or otherwise pay for a unit at a timeshare resort that they intend to regularly use or swap or rent out (or all three).

It’s a big and growing market. According to data published last year by EY, the U.S. timeshare industry grew nearly 7% between 2017 and 2018 to hit $10.2 billion in sales volume.

It’s a market that Kennedy became acquainted with first-hand as a sales executive at the Hilton Club in New York, which, at least in 2018, was among 1,580 timeshare resorts up and running, representing approximately 204,100 units, most of them with two bedrooms or more.

Despite this growth, timeshares don’t jump to travelers’ minds as readily as hotel rooms or Airbnb stays, and therein lies the opportunity.

Part of the problem, as Kennedy see it, is that timeshares are harder to rent out than they should be. If a timeshare owner wants to reserve a week outside of the week that he or she purchased, for example, that person has to go through an antiquated exchange system like RCI (owned by Wyndam) or Interval International (owned by Marriott). Kennedy, who spent 10 years with Hilton, says he saw a number of his customers grow frustrated over time with their inability to better control their units’ usage.

#coronavirus, #covid-19, #extra-crunch, #market-analysis, #startups, #tc, #travel

0

#DealMonitor – #EXKLUSIV Tar Heel Capital Pathfinder investiert in Sentryc


Im aktuellen #DealMonitor für den 19. Juni werfen wir wieder einen Blick auf die wichtigsten, spannendsten und interessantesten Investments und Exits des Tages. Alle Deals der Vortage gibt es im großen und übersichtlichen #DealMonitor-Archiv.

INVESTMENTS

Sentryc
+++ Der polnische Kapitalgeber Tar Heel Capital Pathfinder investiert eine unbekannte Summe in Sentryc. Beim Startup aus Berlin, das von Nicole Jasmin Hofmann gegründet wurde, dreht sich alles um automatisierten Produkt- und Markenschutz. “Dazu durchsucht die Software Online-Marktplätze und das Social Web nach potentiellen Fälschungen, meldet Vorfälle und unterstützt IT-basiert beim Entfernen aus dem Netz”, heißt es zum Konzept der Jungfirma. #EXKLUSIV – entdeckt über Startupdetector

Deutsche Konsum REIT
+++ Der Berliner Internet-Investor Rocket Internet hält inzwischen rund 1,18 Millionen Aktien an Deutsche Konsum REIT, einem  börsennotierten deutschen Immobilienunternehmen mit Sitz in Potsdam. Das Aktienpaket hat einen Wert von rund 20,5 Millionen Euro. Rocket Internet investiert seine Milliarden seit längerer Zeit nicht mehr nur in Startups und Grownups, sondern auch in Immobilien und größere Unternehmen. Zuletzt etwa in den Kabelanbieter Tele Columbus.

Midnightdeal
+++ Ein “renommierter Tourismus-VC aus dem DACH-Bereich” und die bisherigen Business Angel investieren eine sechsstellige Summe in das Das Wiener Travel-Startup Midnightdeal – siehe der brutkasten. Das junge Unternehmen ermöglichst seinen Nutzern Hotelaufenthalte zum Wunschpreis zu buchen. Das frische Kapital soll unter anderem in den Aufbau der Aktivitäten in Deutschland fließen.

OE Service
+++ Die Diamir Holding, also Lorenz Edtmayer und Maximilian Nimmervoll, investieren eine sechsstellige Summe in das Startup OE Service, eine noch junge Online-Plattform, die Werkstätten beim Zugang zum digitalen Servicebuch unterstützt. Das Startup aus Klagenfurt, das im März 2019 an den Start ging, wird von Janos Juvan geführt.

Achtung! Wir freuen uns über Tipps, Infos und Hinweise, was wir in unserem #DealMonitor alles so aufgreifen sollten. Schreibt uns eure Vorschläge entweder ganz klassisch per E-Mail oder nutzt unsere “Stille Post“, unseren Briefkasten für Insider-Infos.

Startup-Jobs: Auf der Suche nach einer neuen Herausforderung? In der unserer Jobbörse findet Ihr Stellenanzeigen von Startups und Unternehmen.

Foto (oben): Shutterstock

#aktuell, #deutsche-konsum-reit, #midnightdeal, #oe-service, #rocket-internet, #sentryc, #tar-heel-capital-pathfinder, #travel, #venture-capital

0

#Interview – Ein Travel-Startup, das seine Kunden jetzt mit Koch-Shows begeistert


Vor drei Jahren starteten Andrea Babilon und Joanna Krupa das Travel-Startup Querido Mundo, eine Plattform, die sich zum Gruppenreisen für Alleinreisende kümmert. Die Corona-Krise traf die Jungunternehmerinnen hart. “Die Auswirkungen spüren wir zu 100 %. Aktuell weiß keiner, inwiefern Reisen 2020 noch stattfinden können, weil wir von den täglichen Nachrichten und Entscheidungen der Politiker abhängig sind. Aber vor allem auch von der Lage vor Ort in jedem einzelnen lateinamerikanischen Land”, sagt Gründerin Krupa.

Die Kölnerinnen haben eine Möglichkeit gefunden gut mit der Krise umzugehen: “Als es mit Corona losging, haben wir sofort überlegt, wie wir Menschen in dieser komischen Zeit träumen lassen und Vorfreude auf die nächste Reise machen können. Und gleichzeitig lateinamerikanisches Flair ins Wohnzimmer bringen können! Daraus ist unser erfolgreiches Querido Live Cooking entstanden”, erzählt Krupa.

Im Interview mit deutsche-startups.de spricht die Querido Mundo-Macherin außerdem über Weltenbummler, Influencer und den Gründer-Standort Köln.

Wie würdest Du Deiner Großmutter Querido Mundo erklären?
Querido Omi… also, liebe Omi, du möchtest nach Lateinamerika reisen und all das erleben, was ein Backpacker erlebt: Du möchtest ins Leben vor Ort eintauchen und Einheimische kennenlernen, auch abseits der ausgetretenen Touripfade. Du möchtest unbeschwert unterwegs sein mit viel Freizeit und einfach eine gute Zeit haben. Und das ein oder andere Abenteuer erleben… Auf der anderen Seite hast du keinen blassen Schimmer, wie du so eine Reise planst und organisierst. Du sprichst kein Wort Spanisch. Dann kennst du niemanden, der zum gleichen Zeitpunkt Urlaub bekommt wie du und mit dir reisen würde. Und du hast Angst, dich allein nach Lateinamerika aufzumachen. Warum kommst du nicht einfach mit uns mit und kostest in deinem nächsten Urlaub so vom Leben in Lateinamerika? Zusammen mit neuen Freunden, die du noch nicht kennst! Querido Mundo organisiert alles für dich und du musst dich um nichts kümmern. Ach, Omi… da du ja kein Spanisch sprichst: Querido Mundo heißt übersetzt “Geliebte Welt”.

Hat sich das Konzept seit dem Start irgendwie verändert?
Bevor Andrea und ich Querido Mundo gründeten, haben wir bereits als Reiseleiterinnen Gruppenreisen geleitet. In der Zeit haben wir unseren Teilnehmern ganz genau zugehört und uns ihre Verbesserungswünsche zu Herzen genommen. Diese haben wir dann bei Gründung als allererstes umgesetzt. Da die meisten Teilnehmer berufstätige Singles zwischen 30 und 50 sind, wollten sie – trotz Backpacking-Charakter der Reise – auf einen gewissen Komfort nicht verzichten. Schließlich handelt es sich um ihren Jahresurlaub. Das heißt im Klartext: Sie wollten sich lieber ein Doppelzimmer mit eigenem Bad teilen statt ein 10er-Zimmer mit Hochbetten und ausgelagertem Großraumbad. Auch bevorzugen sie lieber die liebevoll eingerichtete, einheimische Unterkunft mit Flair, die zum Verweilen einlädt statt das laute Partyhostel. Und bei den Transporten bieten wir einen Mix aus einheimischen Transporten – fürs Flair – und komfortablen Transporten – bei anstrengenderen Strecken – an. Außerdem hat sich unsere Vision im Laufe der Zeit verändert. Wir haben uns auf die Fahne geschrieben, drei gesellschaftliche Probleme in Deutschland aktiv anzugehen: Einsamkeit, Depression und Fremdenhass. Das machen wir, indem wir während einer Querido Reise den Raum schaffen, dass zwischen den Teilnehmern Freundschaften für’s Leben entstehen können. Dann ist die Lebensfreude Lateinamerikas und die unseres begeisterten Teams hochgradig ansteckend. Und unsere Querido Guides erzählen während jeder Reise nicht nur von der fremden Kultur, sondern machen sie verständlich.

Wie ist überhaupt die Idee zu Querido Mundo entstanden?
Andrea und ich haben viele Jahre lang als Reiseleiterinnen in Lateinamerika gearbeitet. Wir waren immer mit kleinen Gruppen unterwegs, zwischen 5 und 14 Leuten. Die Teilnehmer liebten die Art, wie wir die Reisen durchführten und wünschten sich irgendwann ein neues Reiseziel. Anstatt aber nur eine neue Reise auszuarbeiten, machten wir direkt Nägel mit Köpfen und gründeten einen neuen Reiseveranstalter gleich mit. Das war die Geburtsstunde von “Querido Mundo Reisen” mit Kolumbien als allererstem Reiseziel. Übrigens: Herzlichkeit wird bei uns ganz groß geschrieben. Unsere Teilnehmer nennen wie Queridos – liebe Menschen -, und unsere Reiseziele werden auch mir einem “Querido” versehen, zum Beispiel  Querido Mexiko – geliebtes Mexiko.

Die Corona-Krise trifft die Startup-Szene – insbesondere die Travel-Firmen – derzeit hart. Wie und in welcher Form spürt ihr die Auswirkungen?
Die Auswirkungen spüren wir zu 100 %. Wir gehören laut der NRW-Soforthilfe zu den Unternehmen, denen “die Möglichkeiten Umsatz zu erzielen durch eine behördliche Auflage im Zusammenhang mit der COVID-19 Pandemie massiv eingeschränkt wurden”. Im März wurde eine weltweite Reisewarnung ausgerufen, die aktuell bis zum 14. Juni 2020 gilt. Somit wird von allen nicht notwendigen, touristischen Reisen ins Ausland gewarnt. Aktuell führen unsere Reisen ausschließlich in lateinamerikanische Länder. Unsere Querido Kuba Reise im April mussten wir bereits absagen. Und aktuell weiß keiner, inwiefern Reisen 2020 noch stattfinden können, weil wir von den täglichen Nachrichten und Entscheidungen der Politiker abhängig sind. Aber vor allem auch von der Lage vor Ort in jedem einzelnen lateinamerikanischen Land!

Welche langfristigen Auswirkungen erwartest du für Querido Mundo?
Kein Reiseveranstalter kann momentan mit Sicherheit sagen, ob dieses Jahr Fernreisen noch möglich sind. Wir sind allerdings hoffnungsvoll und optimistisch, dass wir spätestens 2021 wieder reisen können. Gerade bekommen wir viele Nachrichten von Reiselustigen, die sehr unter Fernweh leiden. Wir glauben, dass der Trend “Erlebnisse statt Gegenstände sammeln” auch nach der Coronazeit weiter zunehmen wird. Auf jeden Fall ist Aufklärung in punkto “Sicher reisen” wichtig. Corona hat viele Reisende in eine Stockstarre versetzt. Deshalb haben wir uns dazu entschieden, regelmäßig klar zu kommunizieren, wie die aktuelle Lage sowohl in Deutschland als auch in den lateinamerikanischen Ländern ist.

Macht ihr seit dem Ausbruch der Corona-Pandemie etwas anders?
Als es mit Corona losging, haben wir sofort überlegt, wie wir Menschen in dieser komischen Zeit träumen lassen und Vorfreude auf die nächste Reise machen können. Und gleichzeitig lateinamerikanisches Flair ins Wohnzimmer bringen können! Daraus ist unser erfolgreiches Querido Live Cooking entstanden. Jeden Monat kochen wir mit der Community zusammen leckere Gerichte aus Lateinamerika via Zoom. Bisher gab’s mexikanische Quesadillas, Quinoa-Champignon-Risotto aus den Anden und argentinische Empanadas. Außerdem haben wir ganz frisch auf unserer Webseite eine Live-Streaming-Plattform gelauncht, das Reisecafé. Hier bieten wir passionierten Weltenbummlern die Möglichkeit, spannende Vorträge zu halten. Und die Zuschauer haben die Möglichkeit zu spenden.

Wie genau bereitet ihr euch auf die Zeit nach der Corona-Pandemie vor?
Dieses Jahr haben wir uns besonders früh um die Reisedaten für 2021 gekümmert. Außerdem nutzen wir die Zeit jetzt, in der wir nicht reisen können, um bekannter zu werden. Wir sind täglich präsent auf Social Media mit wertvollem Content rund um’s Thema Reisen und Lateinamerika und drehen jede Woche Instagram Stories, um unserer Community einen Einblick hinter die Kulissen von Querido Mundo zu geben. Und wir informieren uns täglich über die Lage in den Querido Ländern und setzen uns mit Sicherheitsmaßnahmen auseinander, die “nach Corona” ein sicheres Zusammensein während einer Gruppenreise gewährleisten.

Wie hat sich Querido Mundo seit der Gründung entwickelt?
Im Gründungsjahr hatten wir ein Reiseziel im Programm: 23 Tage Kolumbien. Im zweiten Jahr waren’s dann schon vier Reiseziele. Mexiko, Kuba und die Anden – Peru, Chile & Bolivien – sind noch hinzugekommen. Während wir im ersten Jahr alle Reisen noch selbst leiteten, arbeiten seit dem zweiten Jahr zwei wundervolle Querido Guides mit uns zusammen, Hannah und Sonja. Übrigens: Alle Pilotreisen leiten wir immernoch selbst, um die Qualität der Reise auf Herz und Nieren zu prüfen.

Nun aber einmal Butter bei die Fische: Wie groß ist Querido Mundo inzwischen?
Alles klar. Da wären einmal Andrea und ich als Gründerinnen. Nächste Woche fängt die dritte Praktikantin bei uns an. Und wie schon erwähnt, Sonja und Hannah als Querido Guides. Dann wäre da noch unsere starke Querido Community, die uns immer tatkräftig mit Tipps und Ideen unterstützt. Unser Umsatz betrug im ersten Jahr 40.000 Euro und im zweiten Jahr 70.000 Euro. In den sozialen Netzwerken kommen wir zusammengenommen auf über 4.000 Follower.

Wo steht Querido Mundo in einem Jahr?
In einem Jahr sind wir deutlich bekannter in Deutschland und h