‘If You Move Out Here, You Make a Deal With Nature’: Life in a Fire-Prone Canyon

Topanga Canyon in Los Angeles County, home to both fire preppers and the fire fatigued, is a scenic, isolated world that has turned the threat of catastrophe into an everyday norm.

#fires-and-firefighters, #topanga-calif, #wildfires

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What’s Going On With Illegal Fireworks in California?

Thursday: Agencies across the state are cracking down ahead of the Fourth of July.

#california, #fireworks, #wildfires

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How to Help Prepare Your Home for the Threat of Wildfires

There are measures you can take to help protect your property from wildfires, including clearing gutters, trimming brush and adding fire-resistant plants to your garden.

#cal-fire, #california, #content-type-service, #federal-emergency-management-agency, #fires-and-firefighters, #national-interagency-fire-center, #wildfires

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The Quiet Strength of an Old-Growth Forest

When you have survived for hundreds or even thousands of years, there’s a strong chance you have seen it all before.

#fires-and-firefighters, #forests-and-forestry, #land-use-policies, #travel-and-vacations, #wildfires

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Hottest Temperatures in Arizona and Nevada History Are Possible

A heat wave across the western United States, already facing a severe drought, could deliver temperatures above 125 degrees.

#arizona, #california, #nevada, #southwestern-states-us, #temperature, #texas, #weather, #wildfires

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Telegraph Fire and Mescal Fire Burn in Arizona

No deaths or injuries have been reported in the blazes east of Phoenix, and the causes are under investigation.

#arizona, #wildfires

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When Living in California Means Fearing the Outdoors

When air quality gets bad from wildfires, people are left clinging to their air purifiers.

#california, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #deaths-fatalities, #drought, #forests-and-forestry, #goats, #los-angeles-calif, #paradise-calif, #population, #rain, #san-francisco-bay-area-calif, #weather, #wildfires

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California Looks at Curbing Construction in Wild Fire-Prone Areas

The state’s insurance regulator endorsed proposals that could reshape the real estate market, the latest sign of climate shocks hitting the economy.

#building-construction, #california, #disasters-and-emergencies, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #homeowners-insurance, #insurance, #napa-calif, #real-estate-and-housing-residential, #wildfires

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OroraTech’s space-based early wildfire warnings spark $7M investment

With wildfires becoming an ever more devastating annual phenomenon, it is in the whole planet’s interest to spot them and respond as early as possible — and the best vantage point for that is space. OroraTech is a German startup building a constellation of small satellites to power a global wildfire warning system, and will be using a freshly raised €5.8M (~$7M) A round to kick things off.

Wildfires destroy tens of millions of acres of forest every year, causing immense harm to people and the planet in countless ways. Once they’ve grown to a certain size, they’re near impossible to stop, so the earlier they can be located and worked against, the better.

But these fires can start just about anywhere in a dried out forest hundreds of miles wide, and literally every minute and hour counts — watch towers, helicopter flights, and other frequently used methods may not be fast or exact enough to effectively counteract this increasingly serious threat. Not to mention they’re expensive and often dangerous jobs for those who perform them.

OroraTech’s plan is to use a constellation of about 100 satellites equipped with custom infrared cameras to watch the entire globe (or at least the parts most likely to burst into flame) at once, reporting any fire bigger than ten meters across within half an hour.

Screenshot of OroraTech wildfire monitoring software showing heat detection in a forest.

Image Credits: OroraTech

To start out with, the Bavarian company has used data from over a dozen satellites already in space, in order to prove out the service on the ground. But with this funding round they are set to put their own bird in the air, a shoebox-sized satellite with a custom infrared sensor that will be launched by Spire later this year. Onboard machine learning processing of this imagery simplifies the downstream process.

14 more satellites are planned for launch by 2023, presumably once they’ve kicked the proverbial tires on the first one and come up with the inevitable improvements.

“In order to cover even more regions in the future and to be able to give warning earlier, we aim to launch our own specialized satellite constellation into orbit,” said CEO and co-founder Thomas Grübler in a press release. “We are therefore delighted to have renowned investors on board to support us with capital and technological know-how in implementing our plans.”

Mockup of an OroraTech Earth imaging satellite in space.

Those renowned investors consist of Findus Venture and Ananda Impact Ventures, which led the round, followed by APEX Ventures, BayernKapital, Clemens Kaiser, SpaceTec Capital and Ingo Baumann. The company was spun out of research done by the founders at TUM, which maintains an interest.

“It is absolutely remarkable what they have built up and achieved so far despite limited financial resources and we feel very proud that we are allowed to be part of this inspiring and ambitious NewSpace project,” APEX’s Wolfgang Neubert said, and indeed it’s impressive to have a leading space-based data service with little cash (it raised an undisclosed seed about a year ago) and no satellites.

It’s not the only company doing infrared imagery of the Earth’s surface; SatelliteVu recently raised money to launch its own, much smaller constellation, though it’s focused on monitoring cities and other high-interest areas, not the vast expanse of forests. And ConstellR is aimed (literally) at the farming world, monitoring fields for precision crop management.

With money in its pocket Orora can expand and start providing its improved detection services, though sadly, it likely won’t be upgrading before wildfire season hits the northern hemisphere this year.

#aerospace, #ananda-impact-ventures, #artificial-intelligence, #earth-imaging, #findus-venture, #funding, #fundings-exits, #greentech, #ororatech, #recent-funding, #satellite-imagery, #satellites, #science, #space, #startups, #wildfire-detection, #wildfires

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A zombie-fire outbreak may be growing in the north

White smoke rising from the tundra in front of the Baird Mountains.

Enlarge / White smoke rising from the tundra in front of the Baird Mountains. (credit: Western Arctic National Parklands (CC BY 2.0))

Each winter, as snow blankets Alaska and northern Canada, the wildfires of the summer extinguish, and calm prevails—at least on the surface. Beneath all that white serenity, some of those fires actually continue smoldering underground, chewing through carbon-rich peat, biding their time. When spring arrives and the chilly landscape defrosts, these “overwintering” fires pop up from below—that’s why scientists call them zombie fires.

Now, a new analysis in the journal Nature quantifies their extent for the first time, and shows what conditions are most likely to make the fires reanimate. Using satellite data and reports from the ground, researchers developed an algorithm that could detect where over a decade’s worth of fires—dozens in total—burned in Alaska and Canada’s Northwest Territories, snowed over, and ignited again in the spring. Basically, they correlated burn scars with nearby areas where a new fire ignited later on. (They ruled out cases that could have coincided with a lightning storm, as well as ones close enough to people to have been caused by an accidental ignition.) They calculated that between 2002 and 2018, overwintering fires were responsible for 0.8 percent of the total burned area in these lands. That sounds small, but one year stood out: 2008, when a single zombie fire was actually responsible for charring 38 percent of the total burned area.

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#arctic, #climate-change, #science, #wildfires

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Facing Hurricane and Wildfire Seasons, FEMA Is Already Worn Out

Multiple missions, combined with years of record disasters, have strained the agency — and scientists predict an unusually severe disaster season ahead.

#disasters-and-emergencies, #federal-emergency-management-agency, #floods, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #hurricanes-and-tropical-storms, #wildfires

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Severe Drought, Worsened by Climate Change, Ravages the American West

Heat and shifting weather patterns have intensified wildfires and sharply reduced water supplies across the Southwest, the Pacific Coast and North Dakota.

#agriculture-and-farming, #albuquerque-nm, #california, #drought, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #lake-mead, #north-dakota, #rain, #water, #wildfires

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Blazes That Refuse to Die: ‘Zombie Fires’

With a changing climate, fires in far northern forests that smolder throughout winter and erupt again in spring could become more common, a new study suggests.

#forests-and-forestry, #global-warming, #nature-journal, #wildfires

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The Meaning and History of a Controlled Burn

Wednesday: A small prescribed burn in Modoc County provided lessons on using good fires to fight bad ones.

#california, #drought, #forests-and-forestry, #national-park-service, #wildfires

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Devin Hilton Falsely Accused by Citizen App of Starting Wildfire

Citizen, a neighborhood crime and safety app, posted a photo of a man and offered a $30,000 reward for tips leading to his arrest. It set off a hunt for the wrong man.

#citizen-app-mobile-app, #homeless-persons, #los-angeles-calif, #mobile-applications, #pacific-palisades-calif, #privacy, #social-media, #wildfires

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What to Save? Climate Change Forces Brutal Choices at National Parks.

For decades, the core mission of the Park Service was absolute conservation. Now ecologists are being forced to do triage, deciding what to safeguard — and what to let slip away.

#acadia-national-park-me, #endangered-and-extinct-species, #environment, #forests-and-forestry, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #invasive-species, #national-park-service, #national-parks-monuments-and-seashores, #wildfires

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Warning Shot for California: A Los Angeles Wildfire in May

The Palisades fire, which remained uncontained on Monday afternoon, forced the evacuation of 1,000 people and hinted at the severity of the state’s drought.

#drought, #evacuations-and-evacuees, #pacific-palisades-calif, #wildfires

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Climate Change Is Making Big Problems Bigger

New data compiled by the E.P.A. shows how global warming is making life harder for Americans in myriad ways that threaten their health, safety and homes.

#allergies, #disasters-and-emergencies, #environmental-protection-agency, #floods, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #hurricanes-and-tropical-storms, #lyme-disease, #regan-michael-s-1976, #wildfires

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Woman is Charged With Starting the 2018 Delta Fire in California

The Delta Fire burned more than 63,000 acres and forced a portion of Interstate 5 to close for days, the authorities said.

#arson, #cynthia-ann-leroux, #fires-and-firefighters, #shasta-county-calif, #wildfires

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‘Firefighters Out There in the Snow’: Wildfires Rage Early in Parched West

Firefighters in New Mexico, Arizona and California are battling springtime blazes that have been fueled by a severe drought and boosted by climate change.

#arizona, #california, #drought, #forests-and-forestry, #global-warming, #hualapai-mountains-ariz, #los-angeles-county-calif, #new-mexico, #southwestern-states-us, #wildfires

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Why Wildfires Are Raging Early in the West Due to Drought and Climate Change

Firefighters in New Mexico, Arizona and California are battling springtime blazes that have been fueled by a severe drought and boosted by climate change.

#arizona, #california, #drought, #forests-and-forestry, #global-warming, #hualapai-mountains-ariz, #los-angeles-county-calif, #new-mexico, #southwestern-states-us, #wildfires

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Nestlé threatened with cease-and-desist over alleged illegal water use

Rows and rows of water bottles.

Enlarge (credit: Daniel Orth / Flickr)

The snow hasn’t completely melted in the Sierra Nevada, but most of California is already deep into a drought. Over 96 percent of the Golden State is experiencing moderate to exceptional drought, compared with 36 percent last year, which was the worst year for wildfires since record keeping began. Meanwhile, in the San Bernardino National Forest, Nestlé continues to pump hundreds of thousands of gallons a week to sell as bottled water.

The folks at California’s State Water Resources Control Board aren’t amused. This week, they issued a cease-and-desist order, demanding that Nestlé “immediately cease all unauthorized diversions of water.”

Nestlé has been pumping water from a creek that feeds the Santa Ana River, which supplies a significant portion of Orange County’s drinking water. The company argues that it has water rights to the creek that date back to 1865, and while the water board admits that may be true, the board says that the company has grossly overdrawn its amount.

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#bottled-water, #california, #policy, #science, #water, #water-rights, #wildfires

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Hundreds Are Forced to Evacuate From Flag Fire in Western Arizona

The Flag Fire has consumed 600 acres in the Hualapai Mountains in northwestern Arizona and prompted the evacuation of about 200 households, the authorities said.

#arizona, #evacuations-and-evacuees, #fires-and-firefighters, #wildfires

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When Climate Breakdown Hits Home: ‘Our Small Town Now Has a Rush Hour’

Readers share how environmental issues are changing their lives.

#disasters-and-emergencies, #environment, #floods, #global-warming, #oil-petroleum-and-gasoline, #wildfires

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The Science of Climate Change Explained

Definitive answers to the big questions.

#agriculture-and-farming, #air-pollution, #content-type-service, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #intergovernmental-panel-on-climate-change, #national-aeronautics-and-space-administration, #oil-petroleum-and-gasoline, #regulation-and-deregulation-of-industry, #research, #science-and-technology, #sustainable-living, #united-nations-framework-convention-on-climate-change, #wildfires

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The humble shrub that’s predicting a terrible fire season

A shrub-covered hillside.

Enlarge (credit: Bryant Baker, Los Padres ForestWatch)

If you’re kind of judgmental when it comes to plants, you might describe the chamise plant as “meh.” Technically it’s a shrub, which in the hierarchy of plant types barely outranks a weed. Chamise grows up to a dozen feet tall and sprouts needle-like leaves less than a half-inch long, making it look like overgrown rosemary. Only it doesn’t really smell, even though it’s a member of the rose family.

Appearances and scents aside, chamise turns out to be a fascinating plant, one critical not only to the California landscape but to the safety of its human residents. When fire scientists want to know how flammable the state’s vegetation might be, they don’t rely on some newfangled gadget. They rely on chamise. “It’s a really pretty and kind of understated shrub,” says Bryant Baker, conservation director of the Los Padres ForestWatch, which advocates for the protection of California’s habitats. “And I think because it’s so common, it’s often taken for granted.”

But Californians ignore it at their peril, because it is an excellent indicator of how dry the whole landscape is getting. Chamise dominates native chaparral ecosystems up and down the state, dense shrublands that are too arid for trees. (This is a Mediterranean climate, after all, in which rain stops in the spring and doesn’t restart until autumn.) But the chamise is beautifully adapted to ride out the baking heat: those tiny, leathery leaves have far less surface area than a broadleaf, so they don’t lose as much moisture. “These plants are adapted to go for many months without a single drop of water, which is pretty amazing,” says Baker. “You don’t usually find that outside of desert areas.”

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#california, #climate-change, #science, #wildfires

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When wildfires rage close, Perimeter wants to tell you where to go

Out the window, a fire is raging — and it’s moving ever closer. Confusion. Fear. A run for the car. Roads open and then suddenly closed by authorities. Traffic jams. A fire break that stalls the flames and then suddenly the flames jump, changing direction. Everyone has a plan for what to do — a plan that gets ripped up the second someone leaves their home to evacuate.

In the heat of the moment, everyone needs to know exactly what to do and where to go. Unfortunately, that information is rarely available in the format they need.

Bailey Farren’s family has experienced this four times living in California north of San Francisco. The wildfires are more common than ever with the aridness of climate change, yet the evacuations remain a pandemonium. While a student at Berkeley, she started investigating what was happening, and why her family constantly lacked the information they needed to get out safely and swiftly. “I thought that first responders had everything they need,” she said.

They don’t. Firefighters on the frontlines often lack the technology needed to relay accurate information to operations centers, which can then guide citizens on how to evacuate. With the pressing need to keep citizens up-to-date, most authorities rely on simple text messages to just tell everyone in, say, an entire county to evacuate, with nary more detail.

The Camp Fire in California in 2018, the worst fire in California’s history, triggered her to go beyond interviewing public safety officers to building a solution. She graduated in spring 2019, and at the same time, founded Perimeter with fellow Berkeley grad Noah Wu.

Perimeter is an emergency response platform designed to “bridge the gap between agencies and citizens” in Farren’s words by offering better two-way communication centered on geospatial data.

The company announced today that it has raised a $1 million pre-seed round led by Parade Ventures with Dustin Dolginow, social-impact organization One World, and Alchemist Accelerator participating. Alchemist was the first money into the startup.

Using Perimeter, citizens can upload geospatial-tagged information such as a new fire outbreak or a tree that has fallen and is now blocking a road. “Sometimes citizens have the most accurate and real-time information, before first responders show up — we want citizens to share that with … government officials,” Farren said. That information is not immediately disseminated to the public though. Instead, first responders can vet the information, ensuring that citizens are always using accurate information in planning their actions. “We do not want it to be a social-media platform,” she explained.

In the other direction, operations centers can use Perimeter to send citizens accurate and detailed evacuation maps with routes on where to go. Unlike with just a text message, Perimeter will send both the message and a URL, which can then display maps and real-time information on how a disaster is progressing.

Right now, the platform is distributed as a web app, so that citizens don’t need to have it pre-installed when a disaster strikes. Farren noted that the company is working on native apps as well, particularly for first responders who need robust offline capabilities due to intermittent cell signals that are typical in disaster zones.

Farren and her team have interviewed emergency management agencies extensively, and she says that her first customer is Palo Alto’s Office of Emergency Services. Over the past two fire seasons, “we had an R&D focus in that we were building hand-in-hand with agencies … and we took two fire seasons to beta test our technology,” she said.

The company has four full-time employees working remotely, but all based in California.

#alchemist-accelerator, #emergency-response, #funding, #startups, #wildfires

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PG&E Charged With Crimes in 2019 California Wildfire

A district attorney filed five felony and 28 misdemeanor counts in connection with the Kincade Fire, which ravaged Sonoma County.

#accidents-and-safety, #bankruptcies, #california, #fines-penalties, #pacific-gas-and-electric-co, #patricia-k-poppe, #sonoma-county-calif, #wildfires

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Tropical Forest Destruction Accelerated in 2020

There were bright spots, but the total lost acreage increased by 12 percent over all from the year before, according to new research.

#agriculture-and-farming, #amazon-jungle, #biodiversity, #brazil, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #economic-conditions-and-trends, #forests-and-forestry, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #indonesia, #logging-industry, #pantanal-brazil, #rural-areas, #wildfires, #world-resources-institute

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South Dakota Wildfires Prompt Mount Rushmore to Close

Gov. Kristi Noem said the monument was not under threat but that gusting winds could cause conditions to change quickly.

#fires-and-firefighters, #monuments-and-memorials-structures, #mount-rushmore-national-memorial-sd, #noem-kristi, #rapid-city-sd, #south-dakota, #wildfires, #wind

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Garbage Truck Driver Is Charged in California Fire That Killed 2

The driver, Antonio Ornelas-Velazquez, is accused by the authorities of dumping a burning load of trash that sparked a deadly fire in 2019 that also destroyed more than 70 structures.

#california, #desert-hot-springs-calif, #district-attorneys, #fires-and-firefighters, #riverside-county-calif, #trucks-and-trucking, #wildfires

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A Surprise in Africa: Air Pollution Falls as Economies Rise

Air quality is improving in one of the continent’s fastest-growing regions, researchers have found. If the trend can be sustained, it would be good news for human health and climate change.

#africa, #agriculture-and-farming, #air-pollution, #alternative-and-renewable-energy, #economic-conditions-and-trends, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #pnas-journal, #research, #wildfires

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Explosion Critically Injures 3 on Movie Set Near Los Angeles

Fire crews used two helicopters to put out a brush fire, which burned an acre of a hillside in Santa Clarita, Calif., the authorities said.

#accidents-and-safety, #fires-and-firefighters, #movies, #santa-clarita-calif, #wildfires

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First Came the Lockdown. Then Came the Wildfire.

Residents on the outskirts of Perth in Western Australia fled their homes in the middle of the night, just days after being told to stay in because of the coronavirus.

#australia, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #fires-and-firefighters, #perth-australia, #wildfires

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How Climate Change May Affect Your Health

No matter where you live or how high your socioeconomic status, climate change can endanger your health, both physical and mental, now and in the future.

#air-pollution, #asthma, #center-for-environmental-health, #centers-for-disease-control-and-prevention, #content-type-service, #global-warming, #pollution, #respiratory-diseases, #water-pollution, #wildfires

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Rain and Snow Headed for Wildfire-Damaged Areas of California

The precipitation in drought-stricken Central and Northern California is welcome. But forecasters warned that flash flooding is possible in areas that burned last year.

#california, #floods, #landslides-and-mudslides, #national-weather-service, #rain, #sierra-nevada-region-us, #weather, #wildfires

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Hounded by Wildfires, Californians Rethink Their Willingness to Rebuild

In the aftermath, some people are deciding to just begin new lives elsewhere. The pandemic and longstanding housing problems haven’t made the choices any easier.

#affordable-housing, #building-construction, #coronavirus-risks-and-safety-concerns, #los-angeles-county-calif, #malibu-calif, #real-estate-and-housing-residential, #renting-and-leasing-real-estate, #riverside-county-calif, #san-bernardino-county-calif, #sierra-nevada-region-us, #wildfires

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Covid-19 Took a Bite From U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions in 2020

Emissions plunged more than 10 percent. If the trend can be sustained, it would put the United States within striking distance of one of its major goals under the Paris climate agreement.

#alternative-and-renewable-energy, #coal, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #electric-light-and-power, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #rhodium-group-llc, #transportation, #wildfires

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A Long, Lonesome Look at America

Alone on a 10,000-mile road trip across the United States, a Times journalist found an America cloaked in solitude — and a country on edge.

#arkansas, #california, #colorado, #conservation-of-resources, #forests-and-forestry, #montana, #oregon, #ozark-mountains, #quarantine-life-and-culture, #states-us, #wildfires

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2020 Ties 2016 as Hottest Yet, European Analysis Shows

The global average temperature in 2020 was about 2.25 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the average from 1850 to 1900, data from the Copernicus Climate Change Service indicates.

#drought, #el-nino-southern-oscillation, #environment, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #temperature, #wildfires

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2020 is Tied With 2016 as Hottest Year Ever on Record

The global average temperature in 2020 was about 2.25 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the average from 1850 to 1900, data from the Copernicus Climate Change Service indicates.

#drought, #el-nino-southern-oscillation, #environment, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #temperature, #wildfires

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U.S. Disaster Costs Doubled in 2020, Reflecting Costs of Climate Change

The $95 billion in damage came in a year marked by a record number of named Atlantic storms, as well as the largest wildfires recorded in California.

#disasters-and-emergencies, #environment, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #hurricanes-and-tropical-storms, #insurance, #munich-re, #wildfires

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The Climate Desk Looks Ahead to 2021

After a year when climate-related disasters seemed to become the norm, the team will be monitoring a 2021 that is pivotal for the world.

#air-pollution, #australia, #california, #content-type-service, #disasters-and-emergencies, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #hurricanes-and-tropical-storms, #methane, #natural-gas, #oil-petroleum-and-gasoline, #presidential-transition-us, #solar-energy, #united-nations-framework-convention-on-climate-change, #united-states-politics-and-government, #weather, #wildfires, #wind-power

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A Year of Watching Earthly Beauty Burn

From orbit, satellites send tragic evidence of climate change’s destructive power. This film covers 10 days, Sept. 7-16, 2020, a period of intense fires activity in North and South America.

#air-pollution, #amazon-jungle, #anxiety-and-stress, #australia, #brazil, #california, #canada, #carbon-capture-and-sequestration, #china, #colombia, #colorado-state-university, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #deaths-fatalities, #earth, #endangered-and-extinct-species, #european-union, #fires-and-firefighters, #floods, #forests-and-forestry, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #gulf-coast-us, #hurricane-laura-2020, #international-space-station, #marshall-tex, #new-zealand, #north-america, #oregon, #pantanal-brazil, #politics-and-government, #sacramento-calif, #seasons-and-months, #stanford-university, #texas, #united-states, #washington-state, #weather, #western-states-us, #wildfires

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Wealthier, Whiter Areas Are More Likely to Get Help After Fires, Data Show

New research offers further signs that racial and economic inequality leave some Americans more exposed to the worsening effects of climate change.

#bureau-of-land-management, #environment, #forest-service, #global-warming, #greenhouse-gas-emissions, #income-inequality, #minorities, #national-park-service, #race-and-ethnicity, #wildfires

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After Wildfires, Mourning the Loss of California’s Giants

For one reporter, documenting the destruction of redwoods and sequoias was a heartbreaking assignment.

#fires-and-firefighters, #global-warming, #mojave-national-preserve, #national-parks-monuments-and-seashores, #sierra-nevada-region-us, #trees-and-shrubs, #wildfires, #yosemite-national-park-calif

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Thousands of Photographs, and a Year Like No Other

The Year in Pictures project is an annual celebration of photojournalism. In 2020, photographers were living what they captured.

#black-lives-matter-movement, #black-people, #coronavirus-2019-ncov, #mills-doug, #new-year, #new-york-times, #photography, #presidential-election-of-2020, #times-square-and-42nd-street-manhattan-ny, #united-states-politics-and-government, #wildfires

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Climate Change and California’s Favorite Trees

Friday: How wildfires could threaten the coast redwood, the Joshua tree and the giant sequoia. Also: What to know about California’s contact tracing app.

#big-basin-redwoods-state-park-california, #california, #mojave-national-preserve, #wildfires

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It’s Australia’s First Big Blaze of the Fire Season. How Bad Will the Summer Get?

Last year, the country suffered catastrophic wildfires. Now, it is watching as a scenic getaway burns. What the rest of the season brings may depend on heat waves, winds and dried-out grass.

#australia, #global-warming, #queensland-australia, #weather, #wildfires

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Arctic’s Shift to a Warmer Climate Is ‘Well Underway, Scientists Warn

This year’s Arctic Report Card, an annual assessment by an international panel of scientists, warned that the effects of global warming are surging across the region.

#american-geophysical-union, #arctic-regions, #environment, #global-warming, #national-oceanic-and-atmospheric-administration, #permafrost, #wildfires

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